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MARS modules 2019-20

The Medieval and Renaissance Studies MA is a flexible degree that permits you either to specialise or to take a broad interdisciplinary range of modules.

Students should refer to the degree structure when selecting modules. Please ensure that you discuss your module selections with the MARS Degree Tutor (Professor David d'Avray).

The modules below are due to run in 2019/20. Please note that modules running in 2019/20 are dependent on student demand. If there is no or low demand from students, modules may be cancelled.

Skills and Sources Module

Skills and Sources

The Skills and Sources module is available only to MARS students.

The Skills and Sources module is worth 15 credits. This module MUST be taken in conjunction with the matching parent module (see full list of available parent modules below). 

The Skills and Sources module is an optional extra in that the parent 15 or 30-credit units with which it is associated can stand alone. Nonetheless, it is worth emphasizing that the MARS MA is distinguished from other similar MAs by its special emphasis on the skills medievalists needs for advanced research. The intensive Latin, Medieval English Book and Manuscripts modules are salient examples but even selected modules that are not explicitly skills orientated can be enhanced by a 15-credit 'Skills and Sources' component designed further to develop research techniques with special reference to the content of the module.

Assessment: 

  • MDVL0007 - Skills and Sources: Manuscripts and Documents - 1 X 4,000-word essay (100%)
  • MDVL0016 - Skills and Sources: The Medieval English Book - Written transcript and 1-hour oral examination
  • MDVL0020 - Skills and Sources: Anglo-Saxon Court Culture - 1 X 5,000-word essay (100%)
  • MDVL0058 - Skills and Sources: Magic in the Middle Ages - Unseen 2-hour written examination (100%)

Latin Modules

Beginner's Latin for Research

DR MARIE-PIERRE GELIN & DR LUCIA PATRIZIO GUNNING

Note: MARS students taking this module usually take this together with the 'Reading Medieval and Renaissance Latin' module (15 credits).

This module attracts students from many disciplines, including Classics, Ancient History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Theology and English. Students taking this module do not need to have any previous experience of learning Latin, although it may be useful to have some knowledge of a modern language.In addition, a basic knowledge of Greek and Roman mythology will be useful to the students in their preparation for the tests and exam.

Level: 7

Module code: MDVL0061

Credits: 30

Timetable: Full year

Assessment: In class test (25%); three-hour unseen examination (75%)

Preparatory reading: Students taking the module should obtain a copy of: Susan Shelmerdine, Introduction to Latin, Focus Publishing, 2013, which consists of one single volume. Copies can be purchased from Waterstones in Gower Street. Additionally, students will need to obtain a dictionary - Chambers-Murray Latin-English Dictionary is a good option.

Reading Medieval and Renaissance Latin

DR MARIE-PIERRE GELIN

This module is available only to MARS students.

Note: This module is usually taken together with the 'Beginner's Latin for Research' module. It can also be taken together with Intermediate Latin at King's College London.

Each week these additional classes illustrate a specific genre of source and students are required to translate passages prepared in advance. This part of the module teaches students how to translate medieval sources, with an emphasis on the basic skills: using a standard classical Latin dictionary; using medieval or Renaissance Latin dictionaries; individuating the first things to look for when translating a sentence; the importance of knowing how to tune the effort to the needs (sometimes understanding the sense is enough, at other times a carefully articulated translation is essential).

Level: 7

Module code: MDVL0063

Credits: 15

Timetable: Full year

Assessment: 1 X 1-hour unseen examination

Intermediate and Advanced Latin

For intermediate and advanced Latin courses students are sent to Dr Daniel Hadas at King's College London. 

Medieval Manuscripts Modules

Medieval Manuscripts and Documents

DR EMILY CORRAN & DR MARIGOLD NORBYE

Note: This module can be taken in conjunction with the 15-credit 'Skills and Sources: Manuscripts and Documents' module (MARS students only)

This module may be taken in conjunction with the 15 credit 'Skills and Sources: Manuscripts and Documents' module (MARS students only)
The majority of literary, historical and archival sources from the medieval period have not been published in a modern edition: it is therefore essential for medievalist researchers to learn how to deal with unpublished materials. The first aim of the course is to teach students how to read manuscript books and documents. It also provides introductory training in the description and dating of manuscript books, in textual criticism, and in the methods and concepts of 'diplomatic', the study of how medieval documents were composed and used. Students will be encouraged to use the collections of medieval manuscripts and documents in London, which has a concentration unrivalled in the English-speaking world. In particular, students will be required to study manuscripts in the British Library directly and in detail. These manuscripts will be tailored to the personal research interests of individual students. Students capable of more advanced work in any of these areas will be given the opportunity to do so. Technical training will be set in the context of the cultural history of writing in the medieval West. In addition to the compulsory classes taught in the history department, optional palaeography lectures and workshops will be available elsewhere in the university, which feed into the core syllabus of this programme.
The course encourages students to realize that the methods and concepts of literary and social theory are not alien to the study of medieval manuscripts. The emphasis will be on Latin manuscripts and documents, but students with a special interest in Middle English or another vernacular can be given extra training if required. Any student having no prior knowledge of Latin is required to attend the Latin for Beginners course.
Students are required to complete written course work that does not constitute part of the course assessment.

Preparatory reading: If at all possible, students should prepare for this course before the beginning of the academic year. To begin to practise transcribing medieval manuscripts and documents, try:

•    Theleme. Techniques pour l'Historien en Ligne : Études, Manuels, Exercices
•    Lyon's new Interactive Album of Mediaeval Palaeography (in English).
•    A CD of the Ductus palaeography course is held in Senate House Library's Special Collections Reading Room

Books which will help students prepare for the Manuscripts and Documents Course are:

•    R. Clemens and T. Graham, Introduction to Manuscript Studies (Cornell U.P., Ithaca etc. 2007)
•    M. P. Brown, A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from Antiquity to 1600 (British Library, 1992)
•    C. de Hamel, History of Illuminated Manuscripts (Phaidon, Oxford 1986).

An invaluable tool for deciphering medieval manuscripts is Adriano Cappelli, Dizionario di abbreviature latine et italiane (Ulrico Hoepli, Milan, many editions). This is available online; you will probably find, however, that it is easier to use a printed copy (try Unsworths off Charing Cross Road, also excellent for Loebs). What you will find far harder to locate is an English translation of Cappelli's introduction.

Credits: 30
Module code: MDVL0006
Timetable: Full year
Assessment:  A manuscript description of 1,500 words, to be completed in the first term (15%), an essay on a manuscript in the British Library, 3000 words, due in the second term (35%) and a 3 hour exam (50%). 

Note: If taking the 'Skills and Sources: Medieval Manuscripts and Documents' module in conjunction with this module, the 'Skills and Sources' module is assessed by one 4,000-word essay, which is to be written as a single piece of work in addition to and separate from the coursework component of the 30-credit 'Medieval Manuscripts and Documents'.

The Medieval English Book

DR MARILYN CORRIEPROFESSOR SUSAN IRVINE; DR NATALIE JONESPROFESSOR RICHARD NORTH

Note: May also be taken in conjunction with the 15 credit 'Skills and Sources: Medieval English Book' module (MARS students only)

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the variety of skills required to read and interpret medieval manuscripts from the Anglo-Saxon period to the fifteenth century. Using important examples of books containing poetry and prose, students will be taught to read medieval handwriting, and how books were constructed and produced. The second strand of the module will include broader social and literary issues concerning medieval books such as patronage and ownership; readership, both male and female; the changing role of scribes and illuminators both in making books and helping to fashion assumptions about reading and interpretation; genre; and locality. By providing a range of material from the Anglo-Saxon period to the later Middle Ages, students will have the opportunity to compare books across both periods while still receiving specialised tuition on each. Old English will usually be studied in one term and Middle English in the other.

NB: Some prior knowledge of Old English or Middle English literature, but not both, is required for the module.

Credits: 30

Module code: MDVL0001

Timetable: Full year

Assessment: 2 x 5,000-word essays

Scandinavian History and Old Norse Modules

Introduction to Old Norse

DR ERIN GOERES

Credits: 30

Module code: SCAN0051

Term: Full year

Department: SELCS

Old Norse, the medieval precursor to the modern Scandinavian languages, was once heard throughout Europe and beyond. During the Middle Ages Scandinavian ships travelled west to North America and east to Istanbul. The scope and variety of the Old Norse literary corpus matches the remarkable span of these journeys: myths and legends, love- and battle-poetry, prose narratives about kings, adventurers, poets and saints are all found in Old Norse. This module will introduce students to a wide range of Old Norse language and literature, situated within the broader context of the history and culture of Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Students will develop a good understanding of the basics of Old Norse grammar and by the end of the module will be able to translate medieval Icelandic prose and some forms of poetry. They will become familiar with key texts in the Eddic, skaldic and saga traditions, and will begin to explore ways in which contemporary scholarship can shed light on the complex but rewarding world of medieval literature.

This module is taught concurrently with the undergraduate module Introduction to Old Norse. Postgraduate students will receive four extra hours of seminar-style teaching.

Advanced Old Norse

DR ERIN GOERES

Credits: 30

Module code: SCAN0061

Term: Full year

Department: SELCS

This module forms the logical continuation of Intermediate Old Norse and will combine advanced translation with the in-depth analysis of four set texts. The first term will focus on Egils saga and its place within the wider context of the Íslendingasögur, konungasögur and skáldasögur. The second term will focus on the poems Eiríksmál, Hákonarmál and Lokasenna.

This module is taught concurrently with the undergraduate module Advanced Old Norse. Postgraduate students will receive four extra hours of seminar-style teaching.

Other Medieval and Renaissance Vernacular Modules

Old and/or Middle English

PROFESSOR RICHARD NORTH

This module aims to provide a reading knowledge of texts in Old and Middle English with the aid of a dictionary through a comprehensive study of basic Old and Middle English grammar, the reading of Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf and the reading in the original of The Wanderer, the first fitt of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the last two books of Malory's Morte Arthur, and The Wakefield Second Shepherds' Pageant.This module involves attendance at an undergraduate module.

Credits:

  • Old and Middle English (MDVL0013) - 30 credits (full year)  OR
  • Middle English (MDVL0010) - 15 credits, term 1  OR
  • Old English (MDVL0014) - 15 credits, term 2

Assessment

  • Old and Middle English (MDVL0013): Unseen three-hour written examination
  • Middle English (MDVL0010): Unseen one and a half hour written examination
  • Old English (MDVL0014): Unseen one and a half hour written examination
Anglo-Saxon Court Culture

PROFESSOR RICHARD NORTH; PROFESSOR SUSAN IRVINE

This module focuses on Old English literature and court culture, considering both works which were produced in connection with a particular court and works whose contents include representation of a court or courts. The module includes a study of some writings associated with Alfred's court at the end of the ninth century and also of poetry such as Beowulf (focusing on, for example, the courtly speeches and their ornate syntax and layers of meaning, and comparison and contrast of Hrothgar’s, Hygelac’s and Beowulf’s courts). Its approach allows students to engage closely with texts from a literary point of view and also to consider how historical, linguistic, and cultural issues bear in significant ways on the interpretation of Old English writings.

NB: Some prior knowledge of Old English is required for the module.

Credits: 30

Module code: MDVL0002

Timetable: Full year

Assessment: 2 X 5,000-word essays

Dante: Divina Commedia

DR CATHERINE KEEN

Credits: 30

Module code: ITAL0035

Term: Term 2

Department: SELCS

This module offers the opportunity to study Dante’s Commedia, one of the most famous works of European literature. It is a poem that broke the mould in its own time, and has continued to fascinate readers ever since. At a time when serious literature was supposed to be written in Latin, Dante used everyday Italian, which caused scandal by giving open access to his opinions of popes and political leaders, bankers and warriors, poets and artists. The poem plunges its readers into a vividly imagined journey through the afterlife, raising all sorts of questions along the way about what Dante wanted to say, and how he chose to say it. What did he mean by calling his poem about death and judgement a ‘comedy’? Why did he make the pagan poet Virgil his major guide to a Christian afterworld? Where did he imagine heaven, hell and purgatory to be located, and how did he claim to have gone there?

This module aims to address questions like these, via thematically as well as sequentially ordered study of the Commedia. It provides students with an overview of the structure and main themes of the poem as a whole, and introduces some of the debates and emphases in the long tradition of its reception. The module necessarily focuses on selections from the 100 canti that make up Dante’s narrative, but will cover key episodes such as the dramatic entry through the hell-gate that warns ‘Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch’intrate’ (Abandon all hope, you who enter here); the surreally compelling dreams of purgatory; and the final vision of paradise in the form of a rose. We will explore some of the book layouts and visual interpretations that have been used over the generations to help readers understand Dante, including works with special UCL connections, like the ‘incunable’ (pre-1500) print copies in the Library’s Special Collections, and the illustrations by Flaxman whose originals are held in the Art Museum.

Metamorphosis: The Limits of the Human

DR JANE GILBERT

Credits: 30

Module code: ELCS0051

Term: 1

Department: SELCS

Metamorphosis, or the self’s radical transformation, is the subject of one of Ovid’s most famous poems, of numerous folk tales (werewolves, especially), and thus of the many medieval works that combine classical antique influences with folklore. People turning into animals or trees and vice versa figure the relations between colonisers and colonised, ‘civilised’ and ‘savage’, in Europe’s marginal areas. They may also stand for the terrible deformations that sin performs on the sinner; or for passion’s devastating or transcendental effects on the lover. Metamorphosis tests and defines the boundaries of the Western human ‘self’ as subject and as object.

In this module we shall look at some medieval instances of metamorphosis in narrative and lyric from a range of European languages, countries and traditions. We shall also investigate modern attitudes to the 'limits of the human', in particular via 'post-human' and 'post-humanist' theoretical approaches (drawing on, for example, animal studies and cyborg studies), with a view to seeing what they can bring to our study of 'pre-humanist' medieval literature - and vice versa.

The module will include four segments, each providing a different perspective on metamorphosis: translation, translatio and metaphor; transforming love; devilry; canines, kings and conquests. Although the list of set texts is long, all the works or extracts are short; many are available free online (and please talk to the module tutor before buying anything). Students have the opportunity to focus on particular works or themes.

Thematic Modules

A Global History of the Middle Ages?

DR PATRICK LANTSCHNER

Globalisation is often understood as a modern phenomenon, but medieval historians are currently debating the extent to which it is desirable and feasible to write a history of global connections and comparisons for the period between 500 and 1500 – an era during which, in many parts of Eurasia, new states emerged, religious systems expanded and mercantile networks were consolidated. The purpose of this module is to think conceptually and methodologically about the challenges of writing a global history of the Middle Ages,  and to question conventional understandings of periodisation, geographical areas, and meanings of the ‘global’. Students can make original and thought-provoking contributions to what is an evolving debate and are encouraged to think about their own research interests within a global context.

Prerequisites: Students on this course must be students on the MA in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, or have studied at least one module in medieval history at undergraduate or graduate level.

Credits: 15

Module code: MDVL0053

Assessment: 1 X 4,000-word essay

Timetable: Term 2

Magic in the Middle Ages

DR SOPHIE PAGE

Magic existed in diverse forms in the middle ages: from simple charms to complex and subversive demonic magic. Its negative characteristics were defined by theologians who sought to isolate undesirable rituals and beliefs, but there were also many who believed that the condemned texts and practices were valuable and compatible with orthodox piety. This course will explore the place of magic in the medieval world and the contradictory responses it evoked, with a particular emphasis on manuscript sources. We will use translations of medieval magical works and scans of manuscript images and texts. The aim of the course is not only to deepen students' historical understanding and further their analytical skills but also to give students interested in planning their own research projects experience in the techniques of reading medieval manuscripts.

Prerequisites: Students on this course must be studying, or have already taken a course in, Latin or a medieval vernacular language. Please contact the course tutor with any queries.

Credits: 15

Module code: MDVL0047

Timetable: Term 2

Assessment: 1 X 4,000-word essay

The Invention of the Question: A History of European Thinking, 1100-1400

DR JOHN SABAPATHY

This module investigates the contexts and contents of European intellectual thinking roughly from the cathedral schools of the early twelfth century to the Florentine ‘renaissance’ of the early fifteenth. The subject is not primarily specific ‘fields’ in this thinking (politics, theology, law, metaphysics, etc), but rather the styles or traditions of thinking that developed over this period, their internal rationales, and their social dynamics. Narrowly speaking the quaestio (question) as an academic analytical exercise was indeed invented in this period. More broadly the period is however also characterised by its development of a wide range of epistemologies and techniques for questioning, investigating, and – ostensibly – resolving exceptionally diverse problems across extraordinarily different fields. Each week we will debate and determine a proposition in relation to these intellectual traditions. Many specific fields will come into this; the module is not an ‘abstract’ one. The aim is both to critique received ideas regarding this thinking (perhaps especially for those new to medieval history) but also to characterise it on its own terms and ambitions. ‘Scholasticism’ was only invented by its detractors at the end of this period, which while rich in philosophy lacked philosophers. How then to make sense of this thinking? 

Credits: 15

Module code: MDVL0054

Timetable: Term 1

Assessment: 1 X 4,000 word essay

Introduction to Latin Epigraphy

DR BENET SALWAY

This is a dedicated 15-credit MA module, offering a succinct and practical introduction to the Latin inscriptions of Roman antiquity. The module introduces students to both the practical study and the interpretation of a broad spectrum of Latin inscriptions, ranging in date from the archaic to the late Roman periods. This module is designed for those taking UCL MA/MSc degrees in the Institute of Archaeology, History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the School of Languages and Cultures.

The module gives an overview of important skills for the use of inscriptions in historical, philological, and archaeological research and offers an introduction to both the practical techniques of recording, deciphering, and interpreting inscribed Latin texts and the techniques of editing and preparing epigraphic texts for publication. The main guides and resources for the practice of the discipline are introduced, and students learn how to use them. This module exploits the material in various collections in central London (the British Museum, University College London, and the Museum of London) to introduce students to a wide variety of examples of different types of inscriptions from various regions of the Roman world, drawn from an extensive chronological range, from the earliest inscriptions of the 8th century BC to the last phases of the significant use of inscriptions in civic life, in the 6th century AD.

Please note: There are no formal pre-requisites but students entering this module should usually have a good pass in Beginners' Latin or the equivalent (as a minimum).

Credits: 15

Module code: HIST0656

Timetable: Taught across terms 1 and 2 (long, thin module)

Assessment: 2 X 2,000-word essays

The Making of the Christian Empire, AD 284-425

DR BENET SALWAY

This module aims to provide students with a thorough grounding in the sources and scholarship relating to the study of the government, religion, and society of the Roman empire during late antiquity, a period which saw a series of radical transformations in the shape and identity of the Roman state: conversion to Christianity, establishment of a new permanent centre at Constantinople, theological dispute and schism, division into western and eastern halves, and barbarian invasion and settlement. By the end of the module students should have acquired a good knowledge of the transformation of the Roman world between the third and fifth centuries AD, the nature and range of relevant ancient sources, modern handbooks, works of reference, and the arguments of scholars, and should have gained an understanding of the potential and limits of these materials so as to be equipped to formulate sensible questions about developments in Roman government, society, and religious affairs, over this period.

Level: 7

Credits: 15

Module code: HIST0423

Timetable: Term 1

Assessment: 1 X 4,000-word essay

Political Thought in Renaissance Europe

DR ANGUS GOWLAND

This course explores the contribution of Florentine republicanism to the political thought of the European Renaissance. It focuses on Leonardo Bruni's  orations and History of the Florentine People; on Niccolò Machiavelli's Prince, Discourses on Livy, and Florentine Histories; and Francesco Guicciardini's Dialogue on the Government of Florence.  Students are encouraged to read these texts closely, to connect the ideas in them to their authors' political and intellectual contexts, and to relate their understanding to the main interpretations of Renaissance republicanism, and early modern political thought more generally, in modern scholarship. There are no formal prerequisites for the course, but some familiarity with early modern intellectual history, particularly political thought, is strongly advised.

Level: 7

Credits: 15

Module code: HIST0626

Timetable: Term 1

Assessment: 1 X 4,000-word essay

Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage

DR CORISANDE FENWICK

Credits: 15 

For more information on this module, please visit the UCL Archaeology webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/study/graduate-taught/courses/themes-debates-islamic-archaeology-heritage

Ink: Material Encounters with Medieval Texts

DR CATHERINE KEEN

Credits: 30

Module code: ELCS0054

Term: 1

Department: SELCS

Modern readers usually encounter medieval texts in standard printed formats, but what about their original audiences? On this course we will think about what medieval texts could look, sound or even feel or smell like before the invention of printing, and about the impact that print and digital technologies have had on the presentation and consumption of such texts. The module includes hands-on sessions where students can examine manuscript and early printed books from UCL’s Special Collections, and gain first-hand experience of the materiality of books hand-written on animal skins (parchment), inked onto rag-paper, and marked by anything from readers’ notes to flood-water or the munching of bookworms. We will examine how texts are transmitted in other visual media such as graffiti, textiles, wall-paintings, tableware, clothing and jewellery, where they can be viewed and read in unexpected ways. We will explore the roles of performance, oral transmission and memory in shaping ideas about authorship, audience and textuality, especially in works composed in Europe's emerging modern languages. The module also looks towards the future in considering the impact today of digitisation of medieval texts, books and manuscripts, and the new forms of reading and text consumption and circulation developing in the twenty-first century.

Four seminars offer focused analysis of text relating to specific topics within the scope of the main module, on topics selected in discussion with students (recent examples include discussions of medieval translation/translatio, multilingual poetry, marginalia and hypertext). The seminars also cover preparation for the final assessed essay.

Modern Medieval: Reception, Revival, Replication

DR ROBERT MILLS

Credits: 30

For more information on this module, please visit the History of Art webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/art-history/prospective-students/ma-special-subjects

Transformations of the Body in Early Modern Cabinets of Display

PROFESSOR ROSE MARIE SAN JUAN

Credits: 30

For more information on this module, please visit the History of Art webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/art-history/prospective-students/ma-special-subjects

Pre-Modern Poetics of Place

DR CATHERINE KEEN

Credits: 30

Module code: ITAL0042

Term: 2

Department: SELCS

The module is designed to explore how medieval, renaissance and early modern writers explore the specifics of place and position in literary production.  It invites students to explore multiple authors, and different literary and historical genres – such as prose, lyric and narrative poetry, drama, epistolography, travel writing, testimonial, as well as the developing techniques of cartography and topographic or ethnographic representation. The module investigates the ways in which different literary forms lend themselves to the exploration of place (both social and topographic) and identity. The focus on space allows exploration of the relationships between centres and margins, and the secular and the religious worlds, as well as of issues of identity, citizenship, and belonging in pre-nation-state Europe and the New World. The authors covered in this module include figures such as Petrarch, Tasso, Santa Teresa de Avila, Santa Rosa de Lima and Shakespeare, whose diverse writings will enable students to explore different aspects of the ‘poetics of place’.

Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917

DR SERGEI BOGATYREV

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the SSEES webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/masters-courses/current-course-outlines/hs_seesgh72

Reframing the Renaissance

DR ROBYN ADAMS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/reframing-renaissance

Forging the Early Modern

DR MATTHEW SYMONDS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/forging-early-modern

Unstitching the Early Modern: Archival and Book Skills

DR ROBYN ADAMS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/unstitching-early-modern-archival-and-book-skills

From Archive to Hard Drive: Technology for Early Modern Research

DR MATTHEW SYMONDS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/archive-hard-drive-technology-early-modern-research

Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture, c.1450-c.1750

DR MATTHEW SYMONDS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/web-01-early-modern-information-culture-c1450-c1750

Shakespeare in His Time

DR CHRIS STAMATAKIS

Credits: 15

For more information on this module, please visit the Early Modern Exchanges webpage below:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/early-modern/study/modules/shakespeare-his-time

Information for non-MARS students taking MARS modules

If you wish to take a MDVL**** module please contact the MARS administration team to enquire about availability and to reserve a space. You should note that places for intercollegiate and interdepartmental students are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Priority is given to MARS students and to students on degrees affiliated with MARS. Please note that your place will not be confirmed until the first week of teaching.

Intercollegiate Options

It may also be possible for students to take intercollegiate modules offered on King's College London's MA in Medieval History, however this is subject to availability and the approval of the MARS Degree Tutor and the module tutor(s) at King's. Students should contact the MARS Administration team to apply for intercollegiate modules.