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MSc Clinical and Public Health Nutrition

MSc Clinical and Public Health Nutrition provides a comprehensive overview of nutrition in modern clinical practice and the application of evidence based nutritional support across the community. This course focuses on the problems of over- and under-nutrition, which apply to most developed nations as well as those undergoing rapid transformation. The programme offers specialised training in the clinical and scientific basis of malnutrition and obesity, and therapeutic approaches to correcting this in the hospital, community and educational setting.

Page Contents
1. What will I learn?
    a) MSc
    b) Postgraduate Diploma
    c) Postgraduate Certificate
2. Who is this course for?
3. What are you looking for in prospective students?
4. Where can this course lead me in terms of careers and employability?
5. Where does the course take place?
6. When does the course run?
7. How much does it cost?
8. How do I apply?

 

What will I learn?

This course is avaliable as a full MSc, a Postgraduate Diploma and a Postgraduate Certificate.

MSc

This is a full-time programme and students must take modules to the value of 180 credits: eight core modules (120 credits) and a research project (60 credits). 

Module TitleCredit ValueTermDay
MEDC0033 Disease-related Malnutrition151Weds
MEDC0034 Fundamentals of Nutrition and Metabolism151Weds
MEDC0035 Disease and Disordered Eating152Fri
MEDC0036 Therapeutic Aspects of Clinical Nutrition152Weds
MEDC0037 Practical Nutrition Assessment151Fri
MEDC0038 Malnutrition in the Community152Fri
MEDC0039 Experimental Design and Research Methods151Fri
MEDC0040 Nutrition and Public Health152Weds
MEDC0044 Research Project603N/A
*Module Availability - Modules offered on the programme may not run in every academic year. If there are any modules which are integral to your study you should check whether they are running in the relevant academic year.
 

As above, modules run on Wednesdays and Fridays in term time. We teach for full days, usually from 9-6pm, so please be prepared to work long hours. A research project schedule will be organised with your supervisor nearer the time.

All students must complete an independent research project, normally with a supervisor from the Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre at UCLH or a NHS-funded research initiative run with conjunction with UCL. Some projects will be subject to ethical approval and CRB clearance, which should be discussed with your supervisor. Students should explore a research areas that interest them and make contact with the relevant departments to see if they can offer  an MSc project. Alternatively, students can explore research activities taking place across UCL via IRIS (http://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/) by using the search engine.

Recent Student Research Projects
Project titleSupervisor
Measuring pinch strength of dialysis patients to determine correlation between muscle strength measured by DXA, bioimpedance and pinch strengthAndrew Davenport
Pilot study to assess the effects of exercise during dialysisAndrew Davenport
Dietary assessment of sodium in patients with renal failureAndrew Davenport
Differences in diet, physical activity and smoking between early and late stage endometrial cancer survivors up to one year post-treatmentAnne Lanceley
Diet quality and cardiovascular risk in uterine cancer survivors: Diet and Exercise in Uterine Cancer Survivors (DEUS) studyAnne Lanceley
Intestinal Motility of Parkinson’s disease patients with Wireless capsuleAnton Emmanuel
Nutrition and Turner syndrome – myfitnesspal apps and physical activityClementina LaRosa
Systematic literature review of nutritional factors that influence the progression and severity of NAFLD-Development of food frequency questionnaire for NAFLD patientsEmmanouil Tsochatzis
Refeeding syndrome on TPN adult inpatients Farooq Rahman
The Impact of 10-weeks supplementation of fruit and vegetable, a (FV) voucher on well-being and changes in BMI of foodbank clientGeorge Grimble
An Audit of the Hospital Food ServiceGeorge Grimble
The Effect of Diet and Lifestyle on Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Yemeni Women.George Grimble
Beetroot and blood pressureGeorge Grimble
Height predictions for Chinese adults and stature differences among populations from different regions of ChinaGeorge Grimble
Fruit and vegetable consumption in people attending FoodbanksGeorge Grimble
 Fenugreek (methi) and blood lipids and blood pressureGeorge Grimble
Weight change in international students studying for examination/Chinese students to determine lifestyle and dietary issues through use of questionnaires.George Grimble
Fruit and vegetable consumption in people attending FoodbanksGeorge Grimble
Revalidation of a nutrition screening tool for use with hospital patients (with UCLH dietetics)George Grimble
Angiogenesis in Adipose TissueIan Evans
Preoperative nutritional factors in enterocutaneous fistula patients as a predictor of morbidityJames Crosbie
Efficacy of the Intra-gastric balloon as a treatment of fatty liver diseaseJude Oben
Investigating dietary patterns in children and relationships with measures of obesity riskJulie Lanigan
Dietary Patterns in Parents of Preschool Children Participating in the Trim Tots Health Lifestyle ProgrammeJulie Lanigan/Atul Singhal
Autocrine signalling by a novel mitogen in a pancreatic tumourJustin Hsuan
An investigation into the relationship between maternal nutritional knowledge,  parental feeding practices and children’s eating behaviour and fruit and vegetable intake            Lucy Cooke
The effect of a 5-day fast on inflammation in stellate cells.Manlio Vinciguerra
Vegetarianism and veganism - motivations for dietary changeMarcus Richards
Assessment of infant and youngchild feeding practices among teenaged and young adult mothers in coastal dwelling communities in Ghana.Marko Kerac
Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) in Infant PopulationMarko Kerac
A comparison of body composition pre and post paracenthesis in patients with liver cirrhosisMarsha Morgan
Body composition of adolescents born at term with a lower birth weight: does catch-up growth affect body composition?Mary Fewtrell
Estimated iron intake and iron status during different stages of complementary feeding in infants in Bogota, ColombiaMary Fewtrell
Evaluation of the use of bioimpedance vector analysis to assess nutritional and fluid status in paediatric patientsMary Fewtrell
Eating disorder symptomology in relation to self-objectification and gender-role identification in athletes in appearance based and non-appearance based sports.Nadia Micali
Low Birth Weight in South Asia TrialNaomi Saville
Nutrition status in patients with gastroparesis and chronic functional vomitingNatalia Zarate-Lopez
Will 'Dry January' make a difference to health ?Nathan Davies
Investigating pathways of energy metabolism in liver cellsNathan Davies
Observational study to describe and measure changes in taste acuity for salt and sweet tastes before and after two modalities of weight loss and the interrelationship with urinary ketones. Nick Finer
Quality of glycaemic control in T2DM patients at presentation for surgeryNick Finer
Taste changes following bariatric surgery/obesity and women's health/BUPANick Finer
Sweet taste changes following bariatric surgery or VLCDNick Finer
Liver dysfunction in Anorexia Nervosa: is there a relationship to increased intestinal permeability?Paul Robinson
Pancreatic insufficiencyPinal Patel
Obesity post-operative advice regarding diet and exercise to non-vulnerable adults attending obesity service clinicsRachel Batterham
Investigation of the effect of Roux-en-Y gastrectomy and sleeve gastrectomy on taste, smell and food reward and relationship with post-operative weight-lossRachel Batterham
Evaluation of Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal for weight loss in comparison to Roux-en-Y bypass surgery on gut hormones, insulin sensitivity and cardiometabolic risk factorsRosaire Gray
Effect of markers of intestinal damage and function on growth in infantsSimon Eaton
Energy expenditure in cultured cellsSimon Eaton
Vitamin and micronutrients deficiency in intestinal failure patientsSimona DiCaro
Inflammatory Stress Mediated Dysfunction of Cholesterol Sensor SCAP Accelerates Foam Cell Formation: a potential new mechanism of atherosclerosis.Xiong-Zhong Ruan

 

Postgraduate Diploma

The Postgraduate Diploma comprises all of the taught modules from the MSc programme (120 credits), without the Research Project. This course is designed to allow students to complete it within 9 months.

Module TitleCredit ValueTermDay
MEDC0033 Disease-related Malnutrition151Weds
MEDC0034 Fundamentals of Nutrition and Metabolism151Weds
MEDC0035 Disease and Disordered Eating152Fri
MEDC0036 Therapeutic Aspects of Clinical Nutrition152Weds
MEDC0037 Practical Nutrition Assessment151Fri
MEDC0038 Malnutrition in the Community152Fri
MEDC0039 Experimental Design and Research Methods151Fri
MEDC0040 Nutrition and Public Health152Weds
*Module Availability - Modules offered on the programme may not run in every academic year. If there are any modules which are integral to your study you should check whether they are running in the relevant academic year.
 

As above, modules run on Wednesdays and Fridays in term time. We teach for full days, usually from 9-6pm, so please be prepared to work long hours.

Postgraduate Certificate

The Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is designed to allow students to complete it within 9 months by attendance on one day only.

Students must take the following modules: 

Module TitleCredit ValueTermDay
MEDC0033 Disease-related Malnutrition151Weds
MEDC0034 Fundamentals of Nutrition and Metabolism151Weds
MEDC0040 Nutrition and Public Health152Weds
MEDC0036 Therapeutic Aspects of Clinical Nutrition152Weds
*Module Availability - Modules offered on the programme may not run in every academic year. If there are any modules which are integral to your study you should check whether they are running in the relevant academic year.
 

As above, modules run on Wednesdays in term time. We teach for full days, usually from 9-6pm, so please be prepared to work long hours.

Who is this course for?

This course is ideal for doctors, health professionals or graduates in nutrition or biomedical science with a keen interest in this disease/malnutrition axis and in effective nutritional therapies. 

Have a look at the following video featuring Shahana, a UK student who studied the MSc in Clinical and Public Health Nutrition in 2016/17.

 

What are you looking for in prospective students?

This course requires a medical degree or a UK bachelor’s degree in an appropriate subject (biological science, biomedicine, biophysics, nutrition, chemistry, medicine), awarded with first or upper second-class honours. 

If you studied a science subject that is not strongly biological or chemical, you are advised to do some preparatory reading and study before you arrive. See our Basic Science for Non-Basic Scientists page for some advice on this.

If you did not study your degree in the UK, please see our International Equivalences page.

If English is not your first language, you'll also have to provide evidence of your language ability, see more on our English Language Requirements page. This course requires "Standard".  You may also wish to consider the UCL Pre-Master's in Biomedical and Medical Sciences, a preparation course for applicants with a conditional offer (based on English language) for this degree. 

 

Where can this course lead me in terms of careers and employability?

This MSc is suitable for candidates who wish to pursue a career in cutting-edge research, the practice of nutrition therapy in the health services of the UK or other countries, or in the clinical nutrition industry. We also aim to provide an ideal foundation for graduates who wish to undertake a PhD.

All UCL students are supported by the UCL Careers Service, as well as the department's own specialist Careers Tutor. Find out how UCL students have benefited from London’s wealth of resources, networking potential, placements, internships and employment opportunities on our Graduate page

AfN Logo

This MSc is registered with the Association for Nutrition, a professional body that holds the UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists (UKVRN), a competency-based register of nutritionists. Graduates of this programme will be eligible to apply for direct entry to the UKVRN as Registered Associate Nutritionists. As part of this accreditation, students must pass all core-competency modules. If a student fails a module, they will be able to graduate (in compliance with UCL policy) with an alternative MSc degree title, however this will not be accredited.

 

Destinations and job roles of recent graduates include:

  • Nutritionist
  • Nutrition Support and Research Dietitian
  • Paediatric Dietitian
  • Lecturer in Dietetics
  • Health Programmes Manager at Trekstock
  • PhD student
  • SpR in Paediatric Gastroenterology
  • Health Columnist 
  • Clinical Researcher 
  • World Cancer Research Fund
  • Ministry of Health Advisor

The following students are alumni of this course:

"I signed up for this MSc at a turning point in my life when I was not quite sure what direction I was heading. I had a strong passion for Clinical Nutrition but what I did not know is that this course would inspire me and open up doors beyond belief into the Public Health realm. It is thanks to this course that I fell in love with Global Health, got to spend two months working in West Africa at the Medical Research Council for my dissertation and am now doing a PhD in pediatric malnutrition on a global health scale - something I never dreamed of doing or thought I would be qualified to do before starting this MSc. The professors, mentors and supervisors I was introduced to through this course are undeniably the reason I am where I am today and I could not be more grateful to UCL for this.'' 
Isabella Stelle, 2017-18

"I made a very sudden decision to study nutrition instead of medicine, partly due to the huge amount of misinformation I was seeing online around nutrition and health. I chose UCL because of it's academic reputation, and thoroughly enjoyed the course. Without the MSc I would not be working as a nutritionist now, with my own private practice. All the presentation skills also paid off as I now do more and more media work, both television and radio, as a nutrition expert, as well as science communication through social media and publishing a book."  
Pixie Turner, 2015-16 
Registered Associate Nutritionist and food blogger  
www.plantbased-pixie.com & www.pixieturnernutrition.com

"This MSc really helped to develop my knowledge and deepen my understanding of a broad range of topics, from physiology and the biochemistry of nutrition, to applying therapeutic techniques using evidence-based nutritional support in hospital, community and educational settings. The course lecturers were incredibly knowledgeable and enthusiastic. As were the guest lecturers, including many world leaders in their fields who shared their passions proudly and provided important insights into a number of nutrition topics. Importantly, several lifelong skills are developed on the course - delivering quality presentations, improving the ability to critically analyse research, and helping to write summaries that carefully consider all the evidence and communicate the outcomes clearly. These are tools that I use daily in my career as a private nutritionist, running nutrition workshops, delivering presentations, providing expert opinion to the media, and communicating nutritional science through my website and social media platforms.''
TJ Waterfall, 2015-16
Registered Associate Nutritionist
www.meatfreefitness.co.uk 

 “After practising as a clinical dietitian for five years, I developed a strong interest in the field of obesity and weight management. This has prompted me to undertake this MSc, not only to enhance my knowledge in the field but also to develop my research skills which I was lacking. What I like the most about this taught programme was the exciting lectures delivered mostly by invited speakers who are an expert in the subject matter. Furthermore, for the research project, students were free to choose the field of nutrition they are interested in. I then took this opportunity to undertake a pilot project under the supervision of Professor Rachel Batterham at the Centre for Obesity Research by which I achieved a first author publication. My passion for obesity research has grown tremendously ever since. As a result of the successful pilot project, I now lead a large multi-centre clinical trial, the BARI-LIFESTYLE trial as part of my PhD candidature. All in all, this MSc has paved the way for achieving my long term career goal as an academic researcher in nutrition and dietetics.” 
Friedrich Jassil, 2013-2014

Where does the course take place?

practical1…

The course is taught on campus in Bloomsbury, the heart of London. We do not offer any online or distance courses at this time.

As well as lectures and tutorials, teaching also takes place in the form of practical lab sessions and site visits to health-care facilities and the wider community. For example: 

 

When does the course run?

The term dates shown below are for 2020/21:

TermDates
First TermMonday 28 September 2020 to Friday 18 December 2020
Second TermMonday 11 January 2021 to Friday 26 March 2021
Third TermMonday 26 April 2021 to Friday 11 June 2021

Students on full-time Masters programmes study for a full calendar year and students are expected to study beyond the end of the third term to prepare their dissertation in time for submission at the end of August.

​​​​​

How much does it cost?

The tuition fees shown below are for 2020/21*:

CourseUK/EUOverseas
MSc£13,850£26,380
Postgraduate Diploma£8,940£17,980
Postgraduate Certificate£4,605£8,940
* Fees for subsequent years may increase or otherwise vary.

 

Wondering how to fund your Master's at UCL? Watch a video on YouTube to learn about available funding options: How to fund your Master’s at UCL

Further information on fees can be viewed on the UCL Fees page. If you're unsure of your fee status, please see our Student Fee Status page and for funding opportunities visit our Scholarships and Funding page. Practical advice for prospective EU students concerning Brexit, as well as links to further information on the topic can be found here.

 

    How do I apply?

    Applications for 2020/21 are now closed. Applications for 2021/22 will open in the Autumn, exact date TBA.

    Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places and those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines. We also recommend students who would require a Tier 4 visa to apply early to avoid delay.

    Apply Now