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Picture of the Week

LUX dark matter detector

Detecting dark matter

The kind of matter and energy we can see and touch – whether it is in the form of atoms and molecules, or heat and light, only forms a tiny proportion of the content of the Universe, only about 5%. Over a quarter is dark matter, which is totally invisible but whose gravitational attraction can be detected; while over two thirds is dark energy, a force that pushes the Universe to expand ever faster.
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Mathematical and Physical Sciences Picture of the Week

Detecting dark matter

The kind of matter and energy we can see and touch – whether it is in the form of atoms and molecules, or heat and light, only forms a tiny proportion of the content of the Universe, only about 5%. Over a quarter is dark matter, which is totally invisible but whose gravitational attraction can be detected; while over two thirds is dark energy, a force that pushes the Universe to expand ever faster.
More...

Kills germs fast

Researchers in UCL's Chemistry department have developed an antibacterial surface that could help cut down on hospital–acquired infections. Scientists have known for some time that certain dyes, when illuminated with strong light, have an antibacterial effect. This is a promising technology as, unlike antibacterial fluids that sit on a surface and can be easily wiped away, the germ–killing properties are part of the surface itself. More...

Seeing in 4D

Jason Lotay (UCL Maths) and Lilah Fowler (UCL Slade School of Fine Art) recently held a public workshop on maths and art, exploring the geometry of 4 dimensions through drawing, folding and making shapes. More...

X-ray vision

UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory is often in the news thanks to its involvement in high-profile space missions. The lab has built and tested much of the instrumentation aboard missions such as the Herschel Space Observatory, Gaia and the forthcoming ExoMars rover. More...

World's biggest telescope

Last week, the UK government pledged £119 million towards the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). This go-ahead means that work on the world's biggest radio telescope can begin in earnest. More...

The changing Arctic

Brimstone

Solar storm

A far flung outpost of UCL

Native copper

UCL's stars

SN 2014J in colour

Physical history

Ashes of a dead star

Control panel

Cold dust in the Crab Nebula

A single atom magnet

The Horse head nebula

The Moon

Labradorite

Chemistry in colour

Fault scarp

Next stop: Mars

Comet ISON

Mixing things up

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