Module Database

Please use the form below to search for information about a module within the Division of Biosciences and Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.

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Module CodeTitleLevelCredit ValueDivisionoutline
PSYCGI20Accessibility and Assistive TechnologiesPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOL3025AdaptationUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will introduce students to the ways that organisms adapt to their environment as well as the approaches that scientists use to study these adaptations. Topics to be covered span morphological and phenotypic adaptations, the selective forces that enact adaptive change, and the genetic basis of adaptation. Each lecture will cover a distinct topic related to adaptation, and students will be introduced to numerous case studies from the current literature.
BIOLG025AdaptationPG15Division of BiosciencesThe course will introduce students to the ways that organisms adapt to their environment as well as the approaches that scientists use to study these adaptations. Topics to be covered span morphological and phenotypic adaptations, the selective forces that enact adaptive change, and the genetic basis of adaptation. Each lecture will cover a distinct topic related to adaptation, and students will be introduced to numerous case studies from the current literature.
BIOLM025Adaptation (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will introduce students to the ways that organisms adapt to their environment as well as the approaches that scientists use to study these adaptations. Topics to be covered span morphological and phenotypic adaptations, the selective forces that enact adaptive change, and the genetic basis of adaptation. Each lecture will cover a distinct topic related to adaptation, and students will be introduced to numerous case studies from the current literature.
ANAT3038Advanced AnatomyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course offers students the opportunity to continue their studies of human anatomy through dissection, anatomical comparison and reading related literature. Each student will focus on one specific dissection project chosen by them in consultation with the course tutors, this year we will focus on limbs. The dissection will be complemented by a coursework portfolio.
BIOS3900Advanced Experimental Skills Projects in Biomedical SciencesUG1Division of BiosciencesStudents undertaking this module will chose 2 sets of experiments from within the suite offered, covering essential techniques across the over-arching department of physiology, pharmacology, and neuroscience. Broadly, these banks of experiments will give students the opportunity to explore a variety of electrophysiolgical data, pharmacological preparations, and human physiology. Each set of experiments will give the students practical experience in designing experiments to answer specific research questions. Students will be obtaining and processing data, and be given instruction in appropriate data analysis and statistical analysis. Finally, the students will provide written and oral accounts of their work, developing their communication skills in these areas.
NEUR3025Advanced Functional NeuroanatomyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module explores the structural organisation and connectivity of the mammalian central nervous system at levels ranging from global behavioural systems to local circuits and synaptic complexes, with a focus on experimental evidence, structure/function relationships and clinical significance, and a particular emphasis on reading original research papers.

Groups of themed lectures will be complemented by Journal Club sessions in which published research papers will be presented and analysed by class members, and for which careful prior reading will be expected. A mid-course formative assessment will focus on the skills involved in critical analysis of research data, and provide valuable practice and feedback relevant to a compulsory question in the end-of-year examination.
NEURG025Advanced Functional NeuroanatomyPG15Division of BiosciencesThis module explores the structural organisation and connectivity of the mammalian central nervous system at levels ranging from global behavioural systems to local circuits and synaptic complexes, with a focus on experimental evidence, structure/function relationships and clinical significance, and a particular emphasis on reading original research papers.

Groups of themed lectures will be complemented by Journal Club sessions in which published research papers will be presented and analysed by class members, and for which careful prior reading will be expected. A mid-course formative assessment will focus on the skills involved in critical analysis of research data, and provide valuable practice and feedback relevant to a compulsory question in the end-of-year examination.
NEURM025Advanced Functional Neuroanatomy (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module explores the structural organisation and connectivity of the mammalian central nervous system at levels ranging from global behavioural systems to local circuits and synaptic complexes, with a focus on experimental evidence, structure/function relationships and clinical significance, and a particular emphasis on reading original research papers.

Groups of themed lectures will be complemented by Journal Club sessions in which published research papers will be presented and analysed by class members, and for which careful prior reading will be expected. A mid-course formative assessment will focus on the skills involved in critical analysis of research data, and provide valuable practice and feedback relevant to a compulsory question in the end-of-year examination.
NEUR3025AAdvanced Functional Neuroanatomy AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOL3013Advanced Human Genetics: Research PrinciplesUG.5Division of BiosciencesHuman Genetics has undergone a tremendous expansion in recent years, in no small measure due to a wide-ranging technological revolution. Results from this research are having a growing impact across a range of disciplines, including medicine, biology, anthropology and forensics. This module introduces the basic principles underlying modern human genetics research. A combination of lectures presenting the theoretical principles, practical exercises allowing you to apply these principles, and research-focused lectures providing illustrative case-studies.
BIOLG013Advanced Human Genetics: Research PrinciplesPG15Division of BiosciencesHuman Genetics has undergone a tremendous expansion in recent years, in no small measure due to a wide-ranging technological revolution. Results from this research are having a growing impact across a range of disciplines, including medicine, biology, anthropology and forensics. This module introduces the basic principles underlying modern human genetics research. A combination of lectures presenting the theoretical principles, practical exercises allowing you to apply these principles, and research-focused lectures providing illustrative case-studies.
BIOLG014Advanced Human Genetics: Research PrinciplesPG15Division of BiosciencesHuman Genetics has undergone a tremendous expansion in recent years, in no small measure due to a wide-ranging technological revolution. Results from this research are having a growing impact across a range of disciplines, including medicine, biology, anthropology and forensics. This module introduces the basic principles underlying modern human genetics research. A combination of lectures presenting the theoretical principles, practical exercises allowing you to apply these principles, and research-focused lectures providing illustrative case-studies.
BIOL3013AAdvanced Human Genetics: Research Principles AUG.5Division of Biosciences
CELL3904Advanced Library ProjectUG1Division of BiosciencesCELL3904 is a library based research project for students who wish to write an in-depth dissertation in the areas of anatomy, cellular and developmental biology, or neuroscience.
NEUR3904Advanced Library ProjectUG1Division of BiosciencesNot applicable
BIOC3014Advanced Molecular Biology of Protein Regulatory NetworksUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOCG014Advanced Molecular Biology of Protein Regulatory NetworksPG15Division of Biosciences
BIOC3014AAdvanced Molecular Biology of Protein Regulatory Networks AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOL3024Advanced Molecular Biology: Genomics and EvolutionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will be divided into two major parts: 1) an initial part where key concepts of gene regulation and essential molecular biology and genomic approaches will be taught via lectures and practicals 2) a second part where specific topics will be addressed and case studies analyzed via interactive seminars complemented with activities (tutorials, problem based learning, workshops), in which the students will be learning critical analysis of data and how to use genomic databases and bio-computational tools.
CELL3050Advanced Molecular Cell BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module concentrates on the key questions and state-of-the-art techniques in modern cell biology. There will be a particular emphasis on modern imaging approaches and techniques allowing the monitoring of the dynamics of cellular processes. The course has been recently modernised to include experts in the rapidly growing disciplines of super-resolution microscopy, cytoskeletal dynamics and imaging of gene expression in living cells.
CELL3050AAdvanced Molecular Cell BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module concentrates on the key questions and state-of-the-art techniques in modern cell biology. There will be a particular emphasis on modern imaging approaches and techniques allowing the monitoring of the dynamics of cellular processes. The course has been recently modernised to include experts in the rapidly growing disciplines of super-resolution microscopy, cytoskeletal dynamics and imaging of gene expression in living cells.
CELLG050Advanced Molecular Cell BiologyPG15Division of Biosciences This module concentrates on the key questions and state-of-the-art techniques in modern cell biology. There will be a particular emphasis on modern imaging approaches and techniques allowing the monitoring of the dynamics of cellular processes. The course has been recently modernised to include experts in the rapidly growing disciplines of super-resolution microscopy, cytoskeletal dynamics and imaging of gene expression in living cells.
CELLM050Advanced Molecular Cell Biology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module concentrates on the key questions and state-of-the-art techniques in modern cell biology. There will be a particular emphasis on modern imaging approaches and techniques allowing the monitoring of the dynamics of cellular processes. The course has been recently modernised to include experts in the rapidly growing disciplines of super-resolution microscopy, cytoskeletal dynamics and imaging of gene expression in living cells.
PSYC3301Advanced Multivariate Statistical Methods in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesMost psychological datasets are inherently multivariate, and proper analysis requires that the subtleties of the interrelationships between multiple measures are taken into account. The advent of cheap computing power and sophisticated computer packages in the past couple of decades has transformed psychological statistics, and this module introduces a range of techniques which once were only for specialists and now are increasingly expected of all psychologists. The first half of the module concentrates on multiple regression, and the problems that can arise in what is effectively a paradigmatic case for all multivariate analysis, and the second half extends the analysis into properly multivariate techniques such as factor analysis, MANOVA, canonical correlation and path analysis. The examples classes are an integral part of the course, not only providing practical experience, but also supporting the lecture material.
PLIN3103Advanced Phonological Theory AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesA discussion of recent developments in phonological theory
PLING211Advanced Phonological Theory APG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesEach year the course selects a topic of current interest in the phonological literature. Topics covered in recent years include: - OT versus rule-based theories of phonology - markedness theory - reduplication; - derivational opacity - first language acquisition - loanword phonology
PLIN3104Advanced Phonological Theory BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn exploration of current developments in phonological theory.
PLING213Advanced Phonological Theory BPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesEach year the course selects a topic of current interest in the phonological literature. Topics covered in recent years include: prosodic structure and segmental phonology in English, information in phonology and the speech signal, vowel reduction, consonant lenition, segment deletion. This year’s course will focus on accounting for variation and gradience in phonological theory.
ANAT3039Advanced Practical AnatomyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis is a Year 3 course for BSc students based around 10x3 hr practical sessions in the Anatomy Laboratory during which students will dissect (in small groups), observe, collect data, and discuss under the guidance of a demonstrator/course tutor. The course covers the practical anatomy of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis, supplemented by a) an individual poster presentation on a relevant recent research paper and b) the recording and interpretation of clinically related observations and the preparation/presentation of a team report.
BIOC3201Advanced Practical in Cell Biology and Signalling IUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn extended laboratory practical designed for Year 3 MSci Biochemistry students in the Faculty of Life Sciences. Under supervision, students will design and carry out original experimental work, analyse data, compare results of their specific experiments with the group and write a report on the findings. A test of the theoretical aspects of the experimental techniques will be taken.
BIOC3101Advanced Practical in Molecular Biology IUG.5Division of BiosciencesUnder supervision, students will design and carry out original experimental work, analyse data, compare results of their specific experiments with the group and write a report on the findings. A test of the theoretical aspects of the experimental techniques will be taken.
BIOC3301Advanced Practical in Molecular Biology IUG1Division of Biosciences
PLIN3004Advanced Semantic TheoryUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAdvanced Semantic Theory provides students with the background and skills necessary to engage with current research in semantics in the field of theoretical linguistics. In doing so, foundational questions are addressed such as i) how to evaluate and test theories of semantics, ii) the relationship between semantics and other aspects of linguistic competence, iii) the relationship and difference between theory and formalism.
PLING218Advanced Semantic TheoryPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAdvanced Semantic Theory provides students with the background and skills necessary to engage with current research in semantics in the field of theoretical linguistics. In doing so, foundational questions are addressed such as
i) how to evaluate and test theories of semantics
ii) the relationship between semantics and other aspects of linguistic competence
iii) the relationship and difference between theory and formalism.
PHAYG031Advanced Structure-Based Drug DesignPG15School of Pharmacy
NEUR3001Advanced Visual NeuroscienceUG1Division of BiosciencesThe full unit includes the NEUR3045 Visual Neuroscience (ex Eye & Brain) half-unit as well as the additional lectures and requirements listed below. This course will teach advanced visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. Summary of Course Content: The course presents a multidisciplinary approach to vision. It will cover anatomical, physiological, genetic, molecular and psychological approaches. The first part of the course, which can be taken as a separate half unit, covers the fundamentals of visual neuroscience from the visual input at the retina to visual perception. The topics range from retinal imaging, visual transduction, the functional anatomy of the retina and LGN, cortical processing to higher level visual functions, such as colour, depth, space, and motion perception. The second part of the course, which completes the full unit, will cover advanced topics including the neural development of the retina, visual development in babies and infants, more in depth coverage of retinal and cortical processing, fMRI, object and face recognition, visual memory, vision and action colour, space, depth, motion and form perception, high level cortical processing, neurology and ophthalmology. Students who take the full-unit will be provided with a strong foundation in visual neuroscience as well as an extensive and unique coverage of the topic that reflects the remarkable diversity of local expertise in vision and visual neuroscience at UCL.
NEURG001Advanced Visual NeurosciencePG30Division of BiosciencesThe full unit includes the NEUR3045/NEURG045 Visual Neuroscience (ex Eye & Brain) half-unit as well as the additional lectures and requirements listed below. This course will teach advanced visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. Summary of Course Content: The course presents a multidisciplinary approach to vision. It will cover anatomical, physiological, genetic, molecular and psychological approaches. The first part of the course, which can be taken as a separate half unit, covers the fundamentals of visual neuroscience from the visual input at the retina to visual perception. The topics range from retinal imaging, visual transduction, the functional anatomy of the retina and LGN, cortical processing to higher level visual functions, such as colour, depth, space, and motion perception. The second part of the course, which completes the full unit, will cover advanced topics including the neural development of the retina, visual development in babies and infants, more in depth coverage of retinal and cortical processing, fMRI, object and face recognition, visual memory, vision and action colour, space, depth, motion and form perception, high level cortical processing, neurology and ophthalmology. Students who take the full-unit will be provided with a strong foundation in visual neuroscience as well as an extensive and unique coverage of the topic that reflects the remarkable diversity of local expertise in vision and visual neuroscience at UCL.
NEURM001Advanced Visual Neuroscience (Masters Level)UG1Division of BiosciencesThe full unit includes the NEUR3045 Visual Neuroscience (ex Eye & Brain) half-unit as well as the additional lectures and requirements listed below. This course will teach advanced visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. Summary of Course Content: The course presents a multidisciplinary approach to vision. It will cover anatomical, physiological, genetic, molecular and psychological approaches. The first part of the course, which can be taken as a separate half unit, covers the fundamentals of visual neuroscience from the visual input at the retina to visual perception. The topics range from retinal imaging, visual transduction, the functional anatomy of the retina and LGN, cortical processing to higher level visual functions, such as colour, depth, space, and motion perception. The second part of the course, which completes the full unit, will cover advanced topics including the neural development of the retina, visual development in babies and infants, more in depth coverage of retinal and cortical processing, fMRI, object and face recognition, visual memory, vision and action colour, space, depth, motion and form perception, high level cortical processing, neurology and ophthalmology. Students who take the full-unit will be provided with a strong foundation in visual neuroscience as well as an extensive and unique coverage of the topic that reflects the remarkable diversity of local expertise in vision and visual neuroscience at UCL.
PHAYM102Advancing Practice through Science (Masters Level)UG1School of Pharmacy
PSYCGI15Affective InteractionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesCoursework 2,500-3,000 words.
PSYCM015Affective Interaction (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN25Affective NeurosciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module presents an overview of the field of affective neuroscience. This will include an introduction to defining emotion, neural correlates of the affective processing system, techniques for experimental investigation of affect, the interaction between emotion and cognition, emotion and memory, the social brain, and development in adolescence.
PSYC1106AAffiliate Seminar in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis seminar module will introduce affiliate students to the style, structure and content of the UCL BSc Psychology programme. The seminars will develop key academic skills and cover a range of disciplines in that are studied in scientific psychology: including cognition, perception, developmental psychology, neuroscience and health psychology. Students on the module will learn academic skills that are required on our programme (in particular report and essay writing, and critical assessment of research paper) and which are particular to UK system in general and a British Psychological Society accredited BSc Psychology degree programme in particular.
PSYC1106BAffiliate Seminar in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis seminar module will introduce affiliate students to the style, structure and content of the UCL BSc Psychology programme. The seminars will develop key academic skills and cover a range of disciplines in that are studied in scientific psychology: including cognition, perception, developmental psychology, neuroscience and health psychology. Students on the module will learn academic skills that are required on our programme (in particular report and essay writing, and critical assessment of research paper) and which are particular to UK system in general and a British Psychological Society accredited BSc Psychology degree programme in particular.
PSYCGP33An Introduction to Psychoanalytic TheoryPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAR1001An Introduction to the Mechanisms of Drug ActionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is designed for those who are new to the subject of Pharmacology and runs during term 1 only. The taught components of the course consist of 22 lectures, two practical sessions, two practical follow-up sessions and four tutorials. The course begins by discussing how drugs called ‘local anaesthetics’ can be used to block nerves. This is an important class of compounds that allow simple surgical procedures to be carried out without pain. The course then moves on to cover some other examples of drugs acting on excitable tissues, such as the muscle relaxant drugs that are often used as adjuncts to more complicated surgical procedures. During these lectures basic principles of drug action are established by considering what happens at the cellular and molecular level. These ideas are then extended into a simple theoretical framework that provides a foundation for establishing mechanisms of drug action (the Hill-Langmuir and Schild equations are the basis for this). The course then moves on to examine drugs for the treatment of diseases such as AIDS, malaria and bacterial infections. This is followed by an introduction to the pharmacology of the central nervous system. This part of the course provides a thumbnail sketch of CNS receptors and disorders as well as a consideration of drug addiction and the abuse of drugs. Finally the development of new drugs and personalised medicine are introduced.
PHAR1001AAn Introduction to the Mechanisms of Drug Action AUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is designed for those who are new to the subject of Pharmacology and runs during term 1 only. The taught components of the course consist of 22 lectures, two practical sessions, two practical follow-up sessions and four tutorials. The course begins by discussing how drugs called ‘local anaesthetics’ can be used to block nerves. This is an important class of compounds that allow simple surgical procedures to be carried out without pain. The course then moves on to cover some other examples of drugs acting on excitable tissues, such as the muscle relaxant drugs that are often used as adjuncts to more complicated surgical procedures. During these lectures basic principles of drug action are established by considering what happens at the cellular and molecular level. These ideas are then extended into a simple theoretical framework that provides a foundation for establishing mechanisms of drug action (the Hill-Langmuir and Schild equations are the basis for this). The course then moves on to examine drugs for the treatment of diseases such as AIDS, malaria and bacterial infections. This is followed by an introduction to the pharmacology of the central nervous system. This part of the course provides a thumbnail sketch of CNS receptors and disorders as well as a consideration of drug addiction and the abuse of drugs. Finally the development of new drugs and personalised medicine are introduced.
PHAYG061Analysis and Quality ControlPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYG024Analytical Techniques in PhytochemistryPG30School of Pharmacy
PHOL2001Animal and Human Physiology: Integrative PhysiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module is designed for students with a background knowledge of Mammalian Physiology, but who are not enrolled in the Physiology BSc degree programme, yet wish to increase their knowledge of the major physiological systems. This course excludes the central nervous system which is covered in PHOL2003 (Systems Neuroscience) and PHOL2005 (Structure & Function of the Nervous System). In addition to lectures and tutorials, the course includes practical work in cardiovascular & respiratory physiology and in endocrinology.
PHOL2001AAnimal and Human Physiology: Integrative Physiology AUG.5Division of BiosciencesDesigned for students with a background knowledge of Mammalian Physiology, but who are not enrolled in the Physiology BSc degree programme, yet wish to increase their knowledge of the major systems and their integration in animal and human physiology. In addition to lectures and tutorials, the course includes practical work in cardiovascular & respiratory physiology and in endocrinology.
BIOL2009Animal BiodiversityUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe animal kingdom (Metazoa) is a vast grouping that encompasses organisms as diverse as corals, worms and whales. This course focuses on animal systematics and biology. As such we will focus on the evolutionary relationships (phylogeny) and biological diversity of animals, and how they are adapted to different environments. Due to the sheer size of the Metazoa we will focus on selected phyla, in order to obtain a broad understanding of the group.
BIOL2009AAnimal Biodiversity AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PLIN7310Animal Communication and Human LanguageUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course will survey what is currently known about animal communication systems, and compare them to what we know about human language (including phonology, syntax, and semantics/pragmatics).
PLING155Animal Communication and Human LanguagePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course will survey what is currently known about animal communication systems, and compare them to what we know about human language (including phonology, syntax, and semantics/pragmatics).
PHAYG025Anticancer Personalised MedicinesPG15School of PharmacyThe module will provide a background to the current state and future potential of anticancer therapy and the emerging role of personalized medicine and patient stratification. The module will consist of an introductory series of 5 lectures covering a brief discussion of cancer and current chemotherapeutic options. Subsequent lectures will explore aspects of: tumour diversity and heterogeneity, personalised medicines and preventive therapies, drug development strategies and an overview of patient stratification and patient information services.
PSYCGT13Applications of PsychoanalysisPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSeminar series are offered to demonstrate the application of psychoanalytic ideas to understanding the wider culture and their contribution to other disciplines such as Philosophy, Literature and Cinema. Essential issues in psychoanalysis such as love and narcissism are examined.
PSYC3201Applied Decision-makingUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module covers major issues that are relevant to different domains (e.g., expertise; methods of improving decision making, advice giving and taking). Lectures on specific applied domains (e.g., medical decision-making, legal decision-making, policy making, financial decision making, consumer decision making) are also included.
PSYCG201Applied Decision-makingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3201 on the module database
HCSCGS04Applied Research, Policy and PracticePG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCG111Assessment and Engagement for CBT in ContextPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge of CBT and developing therapy skills. For theory and knowledge, this module will cover a basic introduction to assessment for CBT, outcomes evaluation, and parenting in relation to CBT for children and young people. For skills development, the module will focus on assessment techniques, using outcome measures and mentalisation skills.
PSYCGN44Assessment and planningPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesCompetent therapy requires the clinician's capacity to understand and make appropriate assessments, and to link such assessments to diagnosis, case conceptualization and treatment planning. This module, which is both theoretical and practical, covers some of the key topics related to assessment and planning therapeutic interventions with children and families, from a multi-theoretical perspective, including: - Undertaking assessments with children and families - The use of diagnoses - Developing effective clinical case formulations - Developing treatment plans for work with children and families
PHOL3011Autonomic and Central Control of Cardiorespiratory FunctionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will look at the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The module will cover the anatomy of the autonomic nervous system (introducing the relevant peripheral and central areas that are involved in homeostatic control), the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system (specifically how they interact to control the activity of the cardiovascular system), the central respiratory network and how it establishes normal breathing patterns, and finally how the activity in these pathways changes in response to exercise and disease. This will be accompanied by a mini-project comparing the sympathetic/parasympathetic balance in different exercise paradigms.
PHOLM011Autonomic and Central Control of Cardiorespiratory Function (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will look at the autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The module will cover the anatomy of the autonomic nervous system (introducing the relevant peripheral and central areas that are involved in homeostatic control), the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system (specifically how they interact to control the activity of the cardiovascular system), the central respiratory network and how it establishes normal breathing patterns, and finally how the activity in these pathways changes in response to exercise and disease. This will be accompanied by a mini-project comparing the sympathetic/parasympathetic balance in different exercise paradigms.
PSYCGN62Basic Clinical Skills and the CYP IAPT modelPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCG112Basic Skills (Developing Understanding)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge of CBT and developing therapy skills. For theory and knowledge, this module will cover relationship factors, including theraputic alliance, eliciting cognitions and developing and sharing formulations with children, parents and teachers. For skills development, the module will focus on therapeutic skills such as summarising and reflecting, emotional recognition, and managing homework tasks.
PSYCG113Basic Skills (Methods of Change)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge of CBT and developing therapy skills. For theory and knowledge, this module will cover basic CBT skills, focusing on methods of change, including behavioural and cognitive methods. For skills development, the module will focus on specific behavioural and cognitive techniques, such as rewards hierarchies and exposure, Socratic questioning, and methods for working with deeper level cognitions.
BIOC1005Basics for Molecular BiosciencesUG0Division of BiosciencesThis is a skills based course unit with no formal assessment. It is however core for all students of the department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. There are teaching sessions which take place at the end of term 3, after the examination period. All first years are expected to attend and complete exercises on information retrieval, presentation skills and practice, laboratory techniques and preparation of a CV. Non attendance will lead to a failure grade for this course.
PSYC3112Behaviour Change: An Interdisciplinary ApproachUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course will present key theories and research findings that further our understanding of behaviour and how to change it. Expertise will be drawn from across five faculties with lecture content spanning five different disciplines: - Behavioural Science; - Epidemiology and Public Health; - Law; - Health Informatics / Computer Science; - The Built Environment & The Environment. Each lecture will include examples of the lecturers’ own research and will be accompanied by one to three key texts with further reading recommended.
PSYC3112ABehaviour Change: An Interdisciplinary Approach AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3112
BIOC1001Biochemistry and Molecular Biology AUG.5Division of BiosciencesBiochemistry 1001 provides a general introduction to cell biology, nucleic acids, protein structure, metabolic biochemistry, cell physiology, cell signalling, and immunology. It is a pre-requisite for several second year courses and is normally taken in year 1.
BIOC1001ABiochemistry and Molecular Biology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC1009Biochemistry and Molecular Biology BUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn introduction to the structure and function of the cell and the biochemistry of cellular systems. An introduction to protein structre, function, enzymes and membranes. The structure of nucleic acids, information content, replication, transcription and translation. Intermediary metabolism, glycolysis, TCA, beta-oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, glycogen metabolism and general nutrition. An introduction to some basic laboratory techniques in Cell and Molecular Biology.
BIOC1009ABiochemistry and Molecular Biology BUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC3027Biochemistry Research Project (Investigative)UG1Division of Biosciences
BIOC3002Biochemistry Research Project (Laboratory-Based)UG1.5Division of Biosciences
PHAYG069Biodiversity and MedicinesPG15School of Pharmacy
BIOL3019Biological Sciences Year Abroad AUG1Division of Biosciences
BIOL3020Biological Sciences Year Abroad BUG1Division of Biosciences
BIOL3021Biological Sciences Year Abroad CUG1Division of Biosciences
BIOL3022Biological Sciences Year Abroad DUG1Division of Biosciences
BIOL3017Biology of AgeingUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course surveys the biology of ageing (biogerontology). It covers evolutionary and mechanistic theories of ageing; comparative biology of ageing; the new model organism genetics of lifespan (eg C. elegans, Drosophila); methods in ageing research (eg microarray analysis); the biology of caloric restriction; cellular senescence, telomeres and cancer; ageing-related disease; the biology of insulin signalling, energy handling and associated diseases (eg diabetes and obesity); stem cells and tissue engineering; prospects for treatments for ageing; and social and ethical issues relating to research on ageing.
BIOLG017Biology of AgeingPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course surveys the biology of ageing (biogerontology). It covers evolutionary and mechanistic theories of ageing; comparative biology of ageing; the new model organism genetics of lifespan (eg C. elegans, Drosophila); methods in ageing research (eg microarray analysis); the biology of caloric restriction; cellular senescence, telomeres and cancer; ageing-related disease; the biology of insulin signalling, energy handling and associated diseases (eg diabetes and obesity); stem cells and tissue engineering; prospects for treatments for ageing; and social and ethical issues relating to research on ageing.
BIOL3017ABiology of Ageing AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOSG096Biomedical Sciences Research ProjectPG60Division of BiosciencesNot applicable
BIOC2004Biomolecular Structure and FunctionUG1Division of BiosciencesThis module provides the students with fundamental principles of theory and practical aspects of protein science that investigates the intricate relationship between biomolecular structure and function and enzymology. The material is presented at a level suitable for the students from a range of first year degree programmes, and to a depth appropriate both for the students who will not continue to study in the subject area and those who will progress to advanced (third year) protein structure/function courses. The course consists of lectures, small group tutorials, laboratory practicals and workshops.
BIOC2004ABiomolecular Structure and Function AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC3029Biosciences in Business and MediaUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis is a new 0.5 unit module being offered for the first time in 2011. It is intended that the majority of students will take this half unit together with the literature project. The half unit will consist of a series of lectures and seminars covering: - Communicating science - understanding how science is published and made accessible to the public - Intellectual property - patenting your inventions - The links between industry and acadaemia in bioscience - Costing and funding a project - Understanding research seminars - Selling yourself and your skills in the job market
PHAY1003Body Systems and Therapeutics 1: Underpinning Principles of Cell and System Function and Drug ActionUG1School of PharmacyThe aim of this module is to provide a solid foundation of the biological sciences that underpin the clinical therapeutic uses of a drug. Cell biology and biochemistry, cell and organ system function, whole body physiology and pharmacology are introduced and discussed in detail. The more applied sciences, such as receptor theory, mechanisms of drug action and pharmacokinetics, build upon this foundation and provide a basis for the systems-based therapeutics modules in subsequent years. In addition, the year 1 "Mathematics for Pharmacists " theme is housed within this module.
PHAY2003Body Systems and Therapeutics 2: Cardiovascular, Renal and Endocrine SystemsUG1School of Pharmacy
PHAY2004Body Systems and Therapeutics 3: Central Nervous System, Gastro-Intestinal System, Liver, Skin, EyeUG1School of Pharmacy
PHAY3102Body Systems and Therapeutics 4: Immunology, Inflammation, Infectious Diseases, Respiratory Diseases and CancerUG1School of Pharmacy
PSYC2205Brain and BehaviourUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesOne of the big challenges in psychology is to understand how relatively "dumb" elements like neurons can co-operate to produce high-level mental operations like thinking and consciousness. The aim of this course is to introduce you to the study of the neurobiology of behaviour. It consists of two modules: one focusing on the principles of the study of animal learning, and the second focusing on the biological basis of various kinds of behaviour, using the aforementioned principles as a base. The animal learning module will cover issues related to the cognitive mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the acquisition of information by the brain: issues related to elicited behaviours, as well as Pavlovian and operant conditioning. We will examine how the findings and theories developed by students of animal learning may be used to explain a variety of animal learning effects. The neurobiology module will begin by looking at the architecture of the nervous system: the names, locations and approximate functions of the major brain areas and the basic workings of a typical neuron. It will look at some of the ways in which neurons are not as simple as was previously thought in particular, how they assimilate information and communicate it to other neurons, and how these communications can change (e.g. when learning occurs). It will then look at how ensembles of neurons, each processing its own set of stimuli; can collectively produce intelligent-looking behaviours such as memory formation or cognitive processing. By the end of the course you will, hopefully, have gained an insight into how knowing about low-level processes can constrain theories about how the high-level processes must operate (and of how this can make the life of a psychologist much easier!).
SLANG204Brain, Mind and HealthPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses core knowledge relating to neuroanatomy, neurological disorders, mental health disorders, health in older age, and health psychology. The overall aim of the module is to provide students with a thorough grounding in these topics, incorporating the latest research-led developments, which they can apply to their clinical practice. In addition, the module aims to familiarise students with neuroscientific research modalities, current and emerging neurobiological therapeutic modalities, and the evaluation of experimental therapies in the context of acquired speech and language disorders. This module will be delivered over terms 1 and 2 of Year B so that foundation knowledge provision can be timetabled in proximity to relevant applied knowledge teaching in the other Year B modules such as Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (acquired), Management of Communication Disorders 4: Speech, Swallowing & Voice, and Professional Studies 2. This module builds upon teaching in Year A modules, especially Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech & Hearing, Phonetics & Phonology.
PSYCGN43Building and maintaining therapeutic relationshipsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesCompetent therapy requires that an effective therapeutic relationship be established and maintained. This module, which is both theoretical and practical, covers five essential competencies, which cut across a range of therapeutic modalities: 1) Establishing a therapeutic alliance; 2) Fostering treatment-promoting behaviours; 3) Recognising and resolving resistance and ambivalence; 4) Recognising and repairing alliance ruptures; and 5) Recognising and working with transference and counter-transference.
PSYCGB03Business Psychology SeminarsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will consist of 20 x 1 hour sessions facilitated by visiting speakers. Speakers will include business psychologists who work as consultants or who are eminent researchers in the field, as well as leading figures from the world of HR, psychological test publishers, etc. The module is designed to give students direct exposure to opinion formers in applied psychology, and speakers will represent different key areas of application of industrial/organisational and business psychology.
PSYCGN67CAMHS Service and Clinical Leadership: Embedding CYP IAPT through Cultural Change 1PG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN68CAMHS Service and Clinical Leadership: Embedding CYP IAPT through Cultural Change 2PG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOC3013Cancer BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course focuses on the mechanism of cancer generation and progression and on the most advanced treatments. Starting with a background integrating genetic, cellular and molecular aspects, it covers recent cancer research leading to a general conceptual framework for the development of this disease. The course also provides insights and illustrations from specific cancer types and concludes with a variety of established and emerging treatments. The overall aim of this course is to provide a strong background for careers related to basic cancer research, experimental medicine and drug discovery.
BIOCG013Cancer BiologyPG15Division of Biosciences
PSYCRC01Case Report 1UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC02Case Report 2UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC05Case Report 3UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC09Case Report 4UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC10Case Report 5UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN66CBT for Anxiety Disorders in Children and AdolescentsPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN65CBT for Depression in Children and AdolescentsPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCG117CBT in ContextPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components, namely learning about theory and knowledge of CBT and developing therapy skills in relation to ensuring CBT is appropriately delivered in context. It includes CBT and families, CBT in schools, and CBT in groups .
CELL2006Cell BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis is a broad-based cell biology course that aims to introduce the student to a wide range of topics related to the biological functioning of eukaryotic cells. The lectures cover how different parts of the cell are formed and function, and how one cell differs from another. The coursework forms an important part of the course and is designed to illustrate specific cellular processes and techniques in greater detail.
CELL2006ACell Biology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHOL3016Cell Polarity and DiseaseUG1Division of BiosciencesEpithelial cells form sheets that cover the surface of the body and line the internal organs and perform vectorial functions. The module will encompass four themes: • Cell Biology of Epithelial cells, • Vectorial transport in health and disease (absorption and secretion), • Specialised function of epithelia in sensing the environment
PHOLG014Cell Polarity and DiseasePG30Division of BiosciencesEpithelial cells form sheets that cover the surface of the body and line the internal organs and perform vectorial functions. The module will encompass four themes: • Cell Biology of Epithelial cells, • Vectorial transport in health and disease (absorption and secretion), • Specialised function of epithelia in sensing the environment
PHOLM016Cell Polarity and Disease (Masters Level)UG1Division of BiosciencesEpithelial cells form sheets that cover the surface of the body and line the internal organs and perform vectorial functions. The module will encompass four themes: • Cell Biology of Epithelial cells, • Vectorial transport in health and disease (absorption and secretion), • Specialised function of epithelia in sensing the environment
PHOL3016ACell Polarity and Disease AUG1Division of Biosciences(Module name change to 'Cell Polarity and Disease' in 14/15). Epithelial cells form sheets that cover the surface of the body and line the internal organs and perform vectorial functions. The module will encompass four themes: • Cell Biology of Epithelial cells, • Vectorial transport in health and disease (absorption and secretion), • Specialised function of epithelia in sensing the environment
PHOL3004Cell Signalling in Health and DiseaseUG1Division of BiosciencesAll cell processes are regulated by signalling pathways. The correct regulation of cell processes is critical for the development and homeostasis of animals whereas dysregulation of these processes results in diseases as diverse as diabetes, schizophrenia and cancer. Taking advantage of the outstandingresearch environment at UCL, this course will consist of a series of lectures and associated journal clubs presented by research scientists of international renown. The lecturers will discuss the signalling pathways that regulate distinct cell processes such as such as proliferation, cell:cell communication, motility, differentiation, fertilisation and cell death. Each researcher will focus on their own research strengths to present an overview of the field, followed by a presentation of work from their own laboratory. The associated journal club will discuss a recent innovative piece of work related to the research area.
PHOLG042Cell Signalling in Health and DiseasePG30Division of BiosciencesAll cell processes are regulated by signalling pathways. The correct regulation of cell processes is critical for the development and homeostasis of animals whereas dysregulation of these processes results in diseases as diverse as diabetes, schizophrenia and cancer. Taking advantage of the outstandingresearch environment atUCL, this course will consist of a series of lectures and associated journal clubs presented by research scientists of international renown.. The lecturers will discuss the signalling pathways that regulate distinct cell processes such as such as proliferation, cell:cell communication, motility, differentiation, fertilisation and cell death. Each researcher will focus on their own research strengths to present an overview of the field, followed by a presentation of work from their own laboratory. The associated journal club will discuss a recent innovative piece of work related to the research area.
PHOLM004Cell Signalling in Health and Disease (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciences All cell processes are regulated by signalling pathways. The correct regulation of cell processes is critical for the development and homeostasis of animals whereas dysregulation of these processes results in diseases as diverse as diabetes, schizophrenia and cancer. Taking advantage of the outstandingresearch environment atUCL, this course will consist of a series of lectures and associated journal clubs presented by research scientists of international renown.. The lecturers will discuss the signalling pathways that regulate distinct cell processes such as such as proliferation, cell:cell communication, motility, differentiation, fertilisation and cell death. Each researcher will focus on their own research strengths to present an overview of the field, followed by a presentation of work from their own laboratory. The associated journal club will discuss a recent innovative piece of work related to the research area.
CELL1001Cells and DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module provides a general introduction to cell biology, developmental biology and tissue structure. Topics will include: Membrane structure and function, cellular organelles, cytoskeleton, cell signalling, cell division, cell physiology, basic principles of embryonic development, cell fate, cell differentiation, and tissue architecture (histology). There are practicals on tissue architecture, developmental biology, and cell physiology.
CELL3030Cellular and Developmental NeurobiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie the development of the nervous system, drawing on examples from both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics include neural induction, neural crest, Schwann cells, hindbrain patterning, CNS patterning, enteric nervous system, and Drosophila neurogenesis.
CELLM030Cellular and Developmental Neurobiology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie the development of the nervous system, drawing on examples from both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics include neural induction, neural crest, Schwann cells, hindbrain patterning, CNS patterning, enteric nervous system, and Drosophila neurogenesis.
CELL3030ACellular and Developmental Neurobiology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC3017Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Cardiovascular DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course will focus on the development of cardiovascular disease and its causes. The molecular basis of hyperlipidaemias. Transgenic model and gene therapy strategies for hyperlipidaemia. Molecular and cellular aspect of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Gene therapy and treatment of vascular disease. The endothelium and cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of free radicals and oxidation in patho physiology and the role of antioxidants in prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of nitric oxide in health and patho-physiology of cardiovascular disease. Molecular aspects of haemostasis and thrombosis will be covered in detail. Role of diet, obesity and diabetes in cardiovascular disease will be related to both environmental and genetic factors
BIOCG017Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Cardiovascular DiseasePG15Division of BiosciencesThis course will focus on the development of cardiovascular disease and its causes. The molecular basis of hyperlipidaemias. Transgenic model and gene therapy strategies for hyperlipidaemia. Molecular and cellular aspect of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Gene therapy and treatment of vascular disease. The endothelium and cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of free radicals and oxidation in patho physiology and the role of antioxidants in prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of nitric oxide in health and patho-physiology of cardiovascular disease. Molecular aspects of haemostasis and thrombosis will be covered in detail. Role of diet, obesity and diabetes in cardiovascular disease will be related to both environmental and genetic factors
NEUR2006Cellular NeurophysiologyUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC3008Cellular Regulation in Biotechnology, Health and DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesSpecific topics that will be covered include the metabolism of ageing, host-pathogen interactions, synthetic biology, engineering of prokaryotic signalling, genetic engineering and biotechnology of algae and cyanobacteria (biofuels).
BIOCG008Cellular Regulation in Biotechnology, Health and DiseasePG15Division of BiosciencesSpecific topics that will be covered include plant metabolism and biotechnology, genetic engineering and biotechnology of algae and cyanobacteria (biofuels), host-pathogen interactions and the production of biocatalysts in bacteria.
BIOC3008ACellular Regulation in Biotechnology, Health and Disease AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHAY1002Chemistry of MedicinesUG1School of PharmacyThe aim of the module is to provide a solid foundation of the chemical sciences that underpin the use of a drug in its broadest sense, i.e. its synthesis, formulation, analysis, metabolism, stability and biological activity. Organic, physical and analytical chemistry concepts are introduced and discussed in detail. A series of keynote "Chemistry of Medicines" lectures highlights each concept in an appropriate pharmaceutical context. Students will be introduced to the practical aspects of chemical synthesis and analyis of raw materials and formulated products. The links and inter-relationships between the individual subjects in year 1 are exemplified by the use of specific drug examples, chosen from the "Formulary Top 25" list, and cross-referenced in the other year 1 modules. In addition, the year 1 "Integrated Therapeutics" theme is housed within this module. The Chemistry of Medicines module develops the understanding and application of pharmaceutical chemistry within three principal themes – organic chemistry, physical chemistry and analytical chemistry for the quantification of drugs in medicines. Organic chemistry is the largest and most in-depth of these components and focuses on five key concepts – drug structure, polarity, stereochemistry, acidity-basicity and reactivity. Each of these concepts is fundamental to the clinical use of drugs and to the other pharmaceutical sciences, influencing formulation, ADME, drug-target interactions, metabolism, drug-drug interactions and ADRs. A series of keynote Chemistry of Medicines lectures highlights each concept in an appropriate pharmacy context, and this is built upon through inter-disciplinary integrated therapeutics sessions. Physical chemistry includes considerations such as the rates at which processes occur and the energies associated with those processes, which can impact on the stability and safe storage of medicines. Analytical chemistry incorporates fundamental skills and understanding including reaction stoichiometry and the calculation and manipulation of amounts and concentrations. The isolation and quantification of drugs in dosage forms via a variety of methods and the interpretation of data are emphasised.
PHAY2001Clinical and Professional ConsiderationsUG1School of Pharmacy
GENEG008Clinical Applications in Pharmacogenetic TestsPG15Division of BiosciencesThe module consists of two parts. The first is a series of seven, hour long lectures which cover the basic principles of pharmacogenetics. In the remaining 8-9 teaching slots, students will each be allocated a disease or disease area (allocation at the commencement of the course) and will be asked to prepare a presentation giving background about the disease, a review of the various medications being used to treat the disease, a review of the current evidence for genetic differences determining response to medication and risk of adverse drug responses and a proposal for future research activities.
PHAYG066Clinical PharmaceuticsPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYG037Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Policy 1PG30School of Pharmacy
PHAYG038Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Policy 2PG30School of Pharmacy
PHAYG039Clinical Practice at Placement SitePG30School of Pharmacy
PSYCGN46Clinical Practice in ContextPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims to familiarize students with the typical framework and clinical settings within which therapeutic work with children and families takes place. It will encompass Child Protection issues, working as part of a multi-disciplinary team, ethical practice, understanding diversity and equality issues among others.
PSYCGN47Clinical Skills 1PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesCompetent therapy requires that the clinician be skilled in tailoring interventions to the needs, expectations and circumstances of the child and his or her family, whilst also maintaining a treatment focus and using appropriate intervention strategies. This module, which is both theoretical and practical, covers some of the key topics related to establishing and maintaining a treatment focus and using specific intervention strategies based on a multi-theoretical perspective. Topics would range from core clinical skills (clarification, confrontation etc.) to techniques specific to a range of theoretical perspectives (therapist's use of self, working with the transference, cognitive re-structuring, social skills training, systemic interventions etc.)
PSYCGN48Clinical Skills 2PG20Division of Psychology and Language SciencesCompetent therapy requires that the clinician be skilled in tailoring interventions to the needs, expectations and circumstances of the child and his or her family, whilst also maintaining a treatment focus and using appropriate intervention strategies. This module, which is both theoretical and practical, builds on what has been covered in 'Clinical Skills I', and covers some of the key topics related to using specific intervention strategies based on a multi-theoretical perspective, and planning and working towards endings. Topics would include techniques specific to a range of theoretical perspectives (therapist's use of self, working with the transference, cognitive re-structuring, social skills training, systemic interventions etc.) and techniques related to specific clinical settings (e.g. working with groups, with parents, with families etc.)
CELL3105Clocks, Sleep and Biological TimeUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will examine the importance of time and oscillations, in a range of biological situations. The central theme will be the circadian or daily clock. We will look at what is currently known about biological clock mechanisms.
CELLG105Clocks, Sleep and Biological TimePG15Division of BiosciencesThis module will examine the importance of time and oscillations, in a range of biological situations. The central theme will be the circadian or daily clock. We will look at what is currently known about biological clock mechanisms.
CELLM105Clocks, Sleep and Biological Time (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will examine the importance of time and oscillations, in a range of biological situations. The central theme will be the circadian or daily clock. We will look at what is currently known about biological clock mechanisms.
PSYCGD99Cognitive and Decision Sciences DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGC27Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression (Behavioural Activation)PG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGC28Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for People with Psychosis: FundamentalsPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGC29Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for People with Psychosis: ImplementationPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCG199Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Children and Young People: DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides an overview of research design and data analysis (both quantitative and qualitative) and a critical framework to view and contribute to the evidence-base relating to CBT with children and young people. This provides the basis for study around the thesis topic and individual research following a recognized/referenced research method. There will also be a focus on development of skills in preparation, analysis and presentation of work.
PSYC3209Cognitive NeuroscienceUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesExperts in the field of cognitive neuroscience present a series of lectures on the neural underpinnings of mental functions. The first part of the module concentrates on explaining what cognitive neuroscience is, what it intends to study, and how it goes about studying it. Conceptual issues about relating mental functions onto physical brain activity will be discussed, along with different techniques that are currently available to measure brain function. The second part of the module concentrates on discussing what is currently known about how particular cognitive functions (e.g. attention, memory, and emotion) are supported by the brain. In addition to the lectures, the module relies on a number of assigned readings. These readings are taken from a key textbook (Gazzaniga, M.S., "Cognitive Neuroscience: Biology of the Mind") and scientific journals. At the end of the module, students will be able to critically read and evaluate research in the area of cognitive neuroscience and be able to appreciate what can, and cannot, be inferred from the methods available to study brain function.
PSYCG209Cognitive NeurosciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesExperts in the field of cognitive neuroscience present a series of lectures on the neural underpinnings of mental functions. The first part of the module concentrates on explaining what cognitive neuroscience is, what it intends to study, and how it goes about studying it. Conceptual issues about relating mental functions onto physical brain activity will be discussed, along with different techniques that are currently available to measure brain function. The second part of the module concentrates on discussing what is currently known about how particular cognitive functions (e.g. attention, memory, and emotion) are supported by the brain. In addition to the lectures, the module relies on a number of assigned readings. These readings are taken from a key textbook (Gazzaniga, M.S., "Cognitive Neuroscience: Biology of the Mind") and scientific journals. At the end of the module, students will be able to critically read and evaluate research in the area of cognitive neuroscience and be able to appreciate what can, and cannot, be inferred from the methods available to study brain function.
PSYCM209Cognitive Neuroscience (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesExperts in the field of cognitive neuroscience present a series of lectures on the neural underpinnings of mental functions. The first part of the module concentrates on explaining what cognitive neuroscience is, what it intends to study, and how it goes about studying it. Conceptual issues about relating mental functions onto physical brain activity will be discussed, along with different techniques that are currently available to measure brain function. The second part of the module concentrates on discussing what is currently known about how particular cognitive functions (e.g. attention, memory, and emotion) are supported by the brain. In addition to the lectures, the module relies on a number of assigned readings. These readings are taken from a key textbook (Gazzaniga, M.S., "Cognitive Neuroscience: Biology of the Mind") and scientific journals. At the end of the module, students will be able to critically read and evaluate research in the area of cognitive neuroscience and be able to appreciate what can, and cannot, be inferred from the methods available to study brain function.
PSYCGC98Cognitive Neuroscience MRes ProjectPG120Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
ANATG009Cognitive Systems NeurosciencePG15Division of BiosciencesThe module discusses cognitive systems and processing in the central nervous system. As well as teaching how the central nervous system processes sensory information (visual, auditory and olfactory), higher-level perceptual and cognitive systems including language processing, face processing, the role of attentional systems, spatial representation and the use of fMRI to examine visual consciousness are also described.
PHAY3101Communicating Science and PracticeUG1School of Pharmacy
PSYCGC13Communication Skills in Cognitive NeurosciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module introduces you to different approaches to communication for cognitive neuroscientists, and you will develop practical, communicative and public engagement skills in cognitive neuroscience. You will learn how to think and express ideas logically and critically; disseminate knowledge; communicate effectively in oral and written form using a variety of methods and media; interact effectively with individuals and small groups; solve problems; organise, plan and manage projects; time management; learn and communicate actively and independently; be creative; assess oneself; make decisions. You will learn about modern ways to disseminate science and throughout the module, key transferable skills will be developed.
PSYCG116Complex ProblemsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components in relation to CBT for children and young people with complex problems: learning about theory and knowledge and developing therapy skills. This module covers developmental disorders and learning difficulties, combination interventions and what to do if the intervention is not working. Therapy skills developed include techniques for using CBT with children with learning difficulties and developmental disorders, working with the network, and providing supervision.
BIOC3010Computational and Systems Biology : In Silico Analysis of Genes and Proteins and their Biological RolesUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course has three themes: (1) Genomics (including mapping, sequencing & assembly, coding region identification, genome projects & model genomes, disease genes, applications in therapy etc.), (2) Analyis of protein sequences (including an introduction to databases, information networks, the World Wide Web, sequence alignment, structural and/or functional motif recognition, estimation of significance, etc.),(3) Analysis of protein structure (including structure comparison, fold classification, structure prediction, protein evolution etc.).
BIOCG010Computational and Systems Biology : In Silico Analysis of Genes and Proteins and their Biological RolesPG15Division of BiosciencesThe course has three themes: (1) Genomics (including mapping, sequencing & assembly, coding region identification, genome projects & model genomes, disease genes, applications in therapy etc.), (2) Analyis of protein sequences (including an introduction to databases, information networks, the World Wide Web, sequence alignment, structural and/or functional motif recognition, estimation of significance, etc.),(3) Analysis of protein structure (including structure comparison, fold classification, structure prediction, protein evolution etc.).
BIOL7015Computational BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics to be covered: 1. Statistics (12 lectures + 6 x 1 hour practicals) - linear models - generalised linear models - multivariate statistics - maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches - resampling and permutation - experimental design and power analysis 2. Modelling (4 lectures +2 x 1 hour practicals) - dynamical models: population dynamics and epidemiology - population and quantitative genetics - game theory - optimisation - simulation approaches 3. Bioinformatics (4 lectures +2 x 1 hour practicals) - biological databases - methods in DNA, RNA and protein analysis
BIOL7015AComputational Biology AUG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics to be covered: 1. Statistics (12 lectures + 6 x 1 hour practicals) - linear models - generalised linear models - multivariate statistics - maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches - resampling and permutation - experimental design and power analysis 2. Modelling (4 lectures +2 x 1 hour practicals) - dynamical models: population dynamics and epidemiology - population and quantitative genetics - game theory - optimisation - simulation approaches 3. Bioinformatics (4 lectures +2 x 1 hour practicals) - biological databases - methods in DNA, RNA and protein analysis
PALSG305Computational Methods for Speech and Hearing SciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesProvides practical experience with a range of computing techniques useful for students wanting to pursue research in Speech and Hearing Science.
PSYCGR15Computer ProgrammingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesComputing for Psychologists is a course for students with little or no prior experience in computer programming. Apart from using a computer, no prior knowledge is assumed. The course consists of 10 three-hour lecture sessions in which programming concepts are introduced and hands-on experience is provided. Programming assignments are set on a weekly basis to solidify concepts and provide further familiarity.
PSYC2301Computing for PsychologistsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesComputing for Psychologists is a module for students with little or no prior experience in computer programming. Apart from using a computer, no prior knowledge is assumed. The course consists of 10 three-hour lecture sessions in which programming concepts are introduced and hands-on experience is provided. Programming assignments are set on a weekly basis to solidify concepts and provide further familiarity.
PSYC2301AComputing for Psychologists AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC2301
PSYCGB01Consulting PsychologyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes, core processes, methods, and applications of psychology to organisations. It examines how individuals behave in organizations, especially how their behavior is affected by others at work, and how this impacts on organisational processes and outcomes. Core constructs to be examined include individual differences (e.g., interests, values, competencies and personality), human motivation (including goals), organisational designs, and employee productivity and engagement. These key themes in industrial organisational psychology will be discussed in the context of modern organizations, leadership, and culture. Current controversies and debates will also be discussed.
PSYCGB01AConsulting Psychology APG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGB04Consumer BehaviourPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes, core processes, methods, and theories of consumer behaviour and psychology. In particular, lectures will discuss the psychological determinants of consumer implicit decision-making as well as, we will be exploring the role of affect and persuasion in a number of academic and applied fields of consumer behaviour. Core constructs to be examined include the impact and role of affect and decision process in light of some resent theoretical developments with practical implications. Lectures will also discuss consumer behaviour techniques and strategies may influence the success of a number of behavioral change initiatives within a number of industries (i.e., health promotion, fiscal management, media, and politics). Thus this course examines the practical implications of consumer behaviour, as well as how psychological theories and methods can help us predict, understand, and behavioral change.
PALS3008Conversation AnalysisUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesHave you ever: • Wondered how a politician replies without answering the question? • Noticed how often football pundits say ‘at the end of the day’? • Marveled at how children learn the rules of conversation? • Felt uncomfortable when talking to someone and later wondered why? Humans are social animals; on a daily basis we use language as a tool for interacting, and conversation is the result. This module will help you to understand the mechanics of conversation from a scientific viewpoint. It will teach you how to analyse the verbal and non-verbal aspects of everyday conversation, using the method and findings of Conversation Analysis (CA). CA is not a method for understanding WHY people speak they way they do - it does not consider underlying psychological processes. Instead it allows researchers to explore HOW people speak in their everyday lives. How they take turns in a conversation, how they fix problems of speaking and understanding (called repair), in sum how they interact with each other to achieve mutual understanding. A key part of the learning experience of this module involves watching and analysing audiovisual recordings of interactions (in English). CA not only provides a method for understanding ‘typical’ interaction, such as peer conversation, child-parent interactions, and interviews, it also extends our knowledge of communication disorders and professional interactions in healthcare and educational settings (e.g. doctor-patient, and teacher-pupil talk). Sessions will cover key findings in these areas, and discuss current CA research at UCL into child language development and acquired communication disorders such as aphasia and dysarthria.
PALSG303Conversation AnalysisPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesHave you ever: • Wondered how a politician replies without answering the question? • Noticed how often football pundits say ‘at the end of the day’? • Marveled at how children learn the rules of conversation? • Felt uncomfortable when talking to someone and later wondered why? Humans are social animals; on a daily basis we use language as a tool for interacting, and conversation is the result. This module will help you to understand the mechanics of conversation from a scientific viewpoint. It will teach you how to analyse the verbal and non-verbal aspects of everyday conversation, using the method and findings of Conversation Analysis (CA). CA is not a method for understanding WHY people speak they way they do - it does not consider underlying psychological processes. Instead it allows researchers to explore HOW people speak in their everyday lives. How they take turns in a conversation, how they fix problems of speaking and understanding (called repair), in sum how they interact with each other to achieve mutual understanding. A key part of the learning experience of this module involves watching and analysing audiovisual recordings of interactions (in English). CA not only provides a method for understanding ‘typical’ interaction, such as peer conversation, child-parent interactions, and interviews, it also extends our knowledge of communication disorders and professional interactions in healthcare and educational settings (e.g. doctor-patient, and teacher-pupil talk). Sessions will cover key findings in these areas, and discuss current CA research at UCL into child language development and acquired communication disorders such as aphasia and dysarthria.
PALS3008AConversation Analysis AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is a version suitable for Term 1 only affiliate students.
PLIN1303Core Issues in LinguisticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module aims to provide conceptual and theoretical foundations for studying linguistics.
PSYCGT12Core Psychoanalytic TheoryPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module traces the development of psychoanalytic theory and technique. It provides an introduction to thematic areas of dreams, sexuality, trauma and anxiety / hysteria and explores psychoanalytic technique and psychopathology. More contemporary Freudian and British Independent psychoanalytic theorists are also covered in this module. There are taught seminars on psychoanalytic concepts of time and space.
PSYCRE01Coursework Assignment 1UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRE02Coursework Assignment 2UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRE03Coursework Assignment 3UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRE04Coursework Assignment 4UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGS03Current Issues in Attitude ResearchPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course focuses on central construction of social cognition, of relevance for a variety of domains (e.g. marketing, consumer psychology, political psychology, racism and social discrimination). The course examines how attitudes are formed, their structure and implications for behaviour, their malleability, and how they can be changed. Various techniques to measure implicit and explicit attitudes are examined as well as the psychological and neural correlates of attitudes. Debates and theoretical models about attitude processing and measurement are discussed. The course focuses also on applications, such as marketing (e.g. persuasion), consumer behaviour, voting behaviour, prejudice and discrimination.
PSYCGC10Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience I: Fundamental ProcessesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module discusses the current state of knowledge in the field of cognitive neuroscience. The focus is on our understanding of lower-level, fundamental cognitive processes. Examples include perception, attention, action, motor control, object recognition, face processing, the mirror system, and consciousness. Experts in each field will describe past and present findings on the topic, using their own research as a guideline and highlighting current controversies and debates. The module will explore findings from a range of neuroimaging techniques and lesion approaches.
PSYCGC08Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience II: Elaborative and Adaptive ProcessesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module discusses the current state of knowledge in the field of cognitive neuroscience. The focus is on our understanding of elaborative and adaptive processes. Examples include memory, speech, language, number processing, social cognition, executive functions and cognitive control. Experts in each field will describe past and present findings on the topic, using their own research as a guideline and highlighting current controversies and debates. The module will explore findings from a range of neuroimaging techniques and lesion approaches.
PSYCGC09Current Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience III: Translational ResearchPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module discusses the current state of knowledge in the field of cognitive neuroscience. The focus is on our understanding of translational research. Examples include cognitive neuropsychiatry, recovery and rehabilitation after neurological damage, cognition across the life span, genetic underpinnings of cognition, and language in the deaf. Experts in each field will describe past and present findings on the topic, using their own research as a guideline and highlighting current controversies and debates. The module will explore findings from a range of neuroimaging techniques and lesion approaches.
PALSG301Current Issues in Production, Perception and Neural Processing of SpeechPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences1. Introduction – Basic phonetic and phonological concepts 2. Introduction – Acoustic phonetics and speech prosody 3. Speech production mechanisms 4. Production and perception of affective prosody 5. Speech processing schemes for cochlear implants 6. Speech perception - Aspects of low level speech processing 7. White matter pathways of the speech perception/production network 8. Aspects of perception and processing of speech in noise 9. Speech production and perception in the brain 10. Speech as a communication system
PLIN3201Current Issues in SyntaxUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces students to a recent theory of a specific topic or a series of related topics in generative syntax.
PLING222Current Issues in SyntaxPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course deals with one specific topic in current syntactic research, or with a few closely related topics. Since the material covered is closely associated with the lecturer\'s own research, the content of the course may change from year to year. However, the course will always involve the reading of recent research papers, class presentations by students, the writing of an individual research project, and of an essay that reports on the outcomes of that project.
PALS3007Deafness, Cognition and LanguageUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module will introduce students to research at DCAL and elsewhere relating to the acquisition and processing of ‘visual language’. The starting point is in the multi-modality of human communication, with emphasis on visual elements of spoken language communication (including gesture) and on sign language, in terms of the psychological and neurological processes that are involved. Throughout there will be special emphasis on modality issues: the extent to which spoken and signed language is shaped by the modalities in which they occur; and similarities and differences between them.
PALS3007ADeafness, Cognition and Language AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is a version suitable for Term 1 only affiliate students.
PALSG201Deafness: Cognition and LanguagePG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences1. Nature and types of prelingual deafness: genetic and physiological factors; epidemiology of non-syndromic deafness; social and educational conditions; and pathways for intervention and acculturation 2. Introduction to Sign Linguistics 3. Sign language development: the first years, school years 4. Sign language developmental impairments 5. Sign language as a second language 6. Psycholinguistics: cross-linguistic studies of signed and spoken language processing 7. Speech reading: the relationship between hearing and vision in language processing 8. Gesture in human communication 9. The deaf brain - The speaking/hearing/signing brain 10. Acquired impairments in sign language
PSYC2204Design and Analysis of Psychological ExperimentsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe topics covered are: Non-parametric statistical tests; introduction to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA); One-Way ANOVA (Between and within subjects designs); Contrast and Trend Analysis on One-Way ANOVA; Factorial ANOVA (Between and within subjects designs); Split-plot (Mixed) ANOVA. Non-linear Data Transformations; Correlation and Simple Regression (Revision); Multiple Regression; Hierarchical Regression; Forming New Variables for Existing Variables; The General Linear Model; Introduction to Factor Analysis
PALS3002Development Disorders of Communication and CognitionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course covers a range of specialized topics related to research in developmental disorders of communication and cognition. The lectures will cover the most recent research on the cognitive and communicative characteristics of William’s Syndrome, Specific Language Impairment, Autism, Specific Learning Difficulties in Literacy and Numeracy, Cerebral Palsy, and Deafness. The course also covers recent theoretical approaches to developmental disorders (e.g. causal modeling, the influence of genes and environment), and addresses practical and theoretical approaches to intervention.
PALS2005Development of Communication and CognitionUG1Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module provides a detailed grounding in the development of communication and cognition, including an introduction to the experimental methods employed in this area, and lays the foundations for understanding and undertaking research in these areas. It examines psychological and linguistic theories of development and represents key aspects of cognitive development and their relation to social development. It provides an overview of the nature of children’s language production and comprehension at different stages, including discussion of the processes by which language is acquired. Practical experience of early child development is provided through observation and data collection.
PALS3003Development of Speech Perception and ProductionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will examine the development of speech perception and speech production during first language acquisition. In speech perception, it will review: - experimental methods used for testing speech perception in infants and older children - theoretical models of speech perception development - experimental findings regarding speech perception development in the first year of life - experimental findings regarding later development - atypical development in children with hearing loss and with SLI. In speech production, it will review: - techniques for eliciting speech data in children - models of speech production development - experimental findings of speech production studies in children - issues of individual variability in speech production in children.
PALSG204Development of Speech Perception and ProductionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will examine the development of speech perception and speech production during first language acquisition. It focuses on SPEECH and therefore complements modules on language acquisition focusing more on syntax or phonology. In speech perception, it will review: - experimental methods used for testing speech perception in infants and older children - theoretical models of speech perception development - experimental findings regarding speech perception development in the first year of life - experimental findings regarding later development - speech development in children with hearing loss and bilingual children In speech production, it will review: - techniques for eliciting speech data in children - models of speech production development - experimental findings of speech production studies in children - issues of individual variability in speech production in children. The module will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions. The course is supported by a Moodle site which gives access to lecture handouts, further supporting materials and a discussion forum.
PALS3003ADevelopment of Speech Perception and Production AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is a version suitable for Term 1 only affiliate students.
PALSG203Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and CognitionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesLectures: 1. Introduction to Disorders of Language, Learning & Cognition 2. Methodological Issues in the study of developmental disorders 3. Dyslexia 4. Reading comprehension impairment 5. Dyscalculia 6. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder 7. Specific language impairment 8. Autism Spectrum Disorder 9. Interventions for Developmental Disorders – Randomised trials 10. Revision session
PALSG202Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive NeurosciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences1.Introduction to Specific Language Impairment 2. SLI and syntax: research findings from behavioural and imaging techniques 3. Auditory non-speech and speech perception in typical and atypical development: insights from behavioural, MEG and ERP techniques 4. The investigation of auditory processing and language processing in infants using ERP techniques 5. Phonological processing in typical and atypical language development 6. Introduction to Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and NIRS/ERP and its application for studying speech and language processing in infants and children 7. Using MRI and fMRI to study auditory processing and language processing in typical and atypical development 8. The semantic and pragmatic interface in language acquisition and disorders 9. Practical exploration of imaging techniques: Understanding imaging experiments and techniques 10. Cross-linguistic perspectives of SLI
ANAT2008Developmental NeurobiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe human brain takes more than 9 months to build and the better part of a lifetime to programme. It could be the most complex object in the Universe, so how is it made? We do not even know how many types of nerve cells make up the brain, but the number is very large and the main challenge of studying early neural development is to understand how this diversity is generated - how the future parts of the nervous system are demarcated, how their intricate nerve cell populations are produced, and how the neurons come to connect up in accurate synaptic circuits. In recent years, there have been great leaps in understanding the molecular signals that determine the identities and fates of developing neurons, guide growing axons to distant locations, and select targets for synapse formation. These mechanisms serve to sketch out an outline of the final wiring diagram of the nervous system, but the precision of the circuits needs to be refined by activity in use - by functional selection following superfluous growth. It is not yet clear where this refinement process ends and learning begins. The course is an introduction to development in the nervous system, from the earliest embryonic events to the development of perception and complex behaviour in the neonate. The emphasis is experimental, that is, less on the facts than on how they were found out and where they lead next.
ANATG002Developmental NeurobiologyPG15Division of BiosciencesThe course will cover early development of the nervous system (including induction and initial patterning of the CNS, neural progenitors, and genetic analysis of laterality in the developing CNS), origin of neural phenotypes (including organizer patterning in the CNS, migration of cortical neurons and motor circuitry in the developing spinal cord), peripheral development (including neurogenesis and neuron-glial switch, and regulation of Schwann cell development and differentiation), and axons, synapses and circuits (including axon guidance in the visual system of Drosophila, axon outgrowth: Ca2+ in growth cones, and early motor neurone-target interactions).
PSYC2209Developmental PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course is taught in two sections. The cognitive development section begins with Piaget's approach to development from infancy to middle childhood, then goes on to consider more recent experimental work and complementary/alternative perspectives. The second section explores processes of socio-emotional development and factors influencing these.
PSYCG115Disorder Specific ApproachesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components in relation to disorder specific approaches in CBT with children, young people and families, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge and developing therapy skills. This module specifically focuses on interventions depression, trauma and OCD, and covers CBT theory, practice and outcomes in relation to these presenting difficulties.
HCSCGS23Disorders of Vocal Tract: Structure and FunctionPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is divided into two parts, taught throughout terms one and two. Disorder of Vocal Tract: Structure & Function Part I includes information which is applicable to both parts, such as neurological assessment, transcription skills and use of instrumentation, while retaining a primary focus on paediatrics.
PHAYGX99Dissertation - MResPG150School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX95Dissertation - MSc CPIPPPG60School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX97Dissertation - MSc Drug DiscoveryPG60School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX96Dissertation - MSc Medicinal Natural Products and PhytochemistryPG60School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX94Dissertation - MSc Pharmacy PracticePG60School of Pharmacy
PLING199Dissertation in LinguisticsPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe dissertation requires students to carry out independent research under supervision. The topic can be in any area of Linguistics, but should allow the student to draw on material that was covered in the modules taken, so that the research can achieve sufficient depth and the student can show evidence of their growing mastery of the subject area.
PLING299Dissertation in Linguistics (Advanced Level)PG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe dissertation requires students to carry out independent research under supervision. For a dissertation at advanced level, the student selects a topic in their area of specialization. This will allow the student to engage in a sophisticated piece of research whose outcome could form the basis for further research at PhD level.
PALSG199Dissertation/Project in Language SciencePG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
HCSCRS06Doctoral Research ProjectUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAR3006Drug Design and DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is taught by the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology and is about the discovery of new drugs. Students will consider the ways of identifying novel compounds for development and the processes which take place before such compounds are released onto the market following its introduction into clinical practice. The course includes an opportunity for project work on the development of a specific drug, a practical class on the effects of drugs on gastric secretion in human volunteers, seminars on ethics committee operation and on drug licensing and a one-day visit to the drug industry.
PHARG006Drug Design and DevelopmentPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course is taught by the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology and is about the discovery of new drugs. Students will consider the ways of identifying novel compounds for development and the processes which take place before such compounds are released onto the market following its introduction into clinical practice. The course includes an opportunity for project work on the development of a specific drug, a practical class on the effects of drugs on gastric secretion in human volunteers, seminars on ethics committee operation and on drug licensing and a one-day visit to the drug industry.
PHARM006Drug Design and Development (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is taught by the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology and is about the discovery of new drugs. Students will consider the ways of identifying novel compounds for development and the processes which take place before such compounds are released onto the market following its introduction into clinical practice. The course includes an opportunity for project work on the development of a specific drug, a practical class on the effects of drugs on gastric secretion in human volunteers, seminars on ethics committee operation and on drug licensing and a one-day visit to the drug industry.
PHAR3006ADrug Design and Development AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHAR2001Drugs and the MindUG.5Division of BiosciencesDrugs which affect the central nervous system can be used for therapeutic benefit, eg antidepressants, analgesics, tranquillisers, or to modify normal behaviour eg. amphetamine, cannabis, alcohol etc. In this course you will be told not only about what drugs do but how they are thought to do it.
PHAR2001ADrugs and the MindUG.5Division of Biosciences
CELL3006Dynamic Biological SystemsUG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics: Programming using Python. Rate equations. Modelling systems. Systems behaviour. Investigating and analysing systems. Stochastic models. Oscillations in biology. Phase space analysis. Chaotic and complex behaviour. Synthetic biology.
CELLG006Dynamic Biological SystemsPG15Division of BiosciencesTopics: Programming using Python. Rate equations. Modelling systems. Systems behaviour. Investigating and analysing systems. Stochastic models. Oscillations in biology. Phase space analysis. Chaotic and complex behaviour. Synthetic biology.
CELLM006Dynamic Biological Systems (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics: Programming using Python. Rate equations. Modelling systems. Systems behaviour. Investigating and analysing systems. Stochastic models. Oscillations in biology. Phase space analysis. Chaotic and complex behaviour. Synthetic biology.
BIOL7008Ecological Genetics - Field CourseUG.5Division of BiosciencesA half unit organised around field course, currently sited in southern Spain. The course was designed to complement the BIOL2007 Evolutionary Genetics course, and gives an introduction to the techniques of investigating the genetics and ecology of natural populations of plants and animals. Lectures and practicals take place in Spain during the Easter Vacation.
PHAYG105Education, Training and DevelopmentPG20School of Pharmacy
BIOL7016Energy and EvolutionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will cover major evolutionary transitions from a bioenergetic perspective. It will emphasize the impact of mechanistic innovations in bioenergetics on evolution and earth systems. The course will show how energetics necessarily underpinned the origin of life, and how the acquisition of new sources of energy (from water to oxygen) and new modes of genetic control (such as specialized bioenergetic genomes) enabled the evolution of innovations from photosynthesis and programmed cell death to eukaryotes, metazoans and endothermy. The unifying theme of energetics will give insights into diverse fields of biology, including environmental microbiology, genetics, biochemistry, physiology and plant sciences, helping to provide an integrated understanding of biology.
PSYCGC16Engagement and Assessment of Patients with Common Mental Health ProblemsPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will focus on acquisition of knowledge, understanding and skills in engagement, assessment and shared decision making for low intensity CBT. This will focus on a core set of competences including active listening, engagement, alliance building, patient centred information gathering, information sharing and shared decision making.
BIOC2003Essential Molecular BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis half-unit course, intended for students not specialising in Biochemistry, is a lecture course with tutorials. It covers topics in molecular biology.
BIOC2002Essential Protein Structure and FunctionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis whole course unit is designed for students whose principal discipline is not Biochemistry, but whose interests lie in the broad area of biological sciences. It is primarily a lecture course with tutorials. The first half of the course is taught with, and has the same content as, Biochemistry BIOC20003 namely molecular biology. It then proceeds in the second term to cover topics in protein structure.
PSYCGN42Evaluating Clinical InterventionsPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGE99Evaluative Report on Project WorkPG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYC1107Evidence and Enquiry in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will cover the range of disciplines in psychology, giving a conceptual, methodological and historical background. The following topics will be covered 1. science of mind and behaviour, including conscious and unconscious mental processes 2. development, including interplay of nature and nurture 3. cognition, including memory, perception, language 4. the brain, including the effects of psychoactive drugs and mental illnesses 5. social and emotional behaviour
PSYCGC18Evidence-Based Low-Intensity Treatment for Common Mental Health DisordersPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will focus on acquisition of knowledge, understanding and skills in necessary to provide effective for low intensity CBT including guided self-help, behavioural activation and computerised CBT. The course will place considerable emphasis on the role of participants in facilitating patient self-management.
BIOL2007Evolutionary GeneticsUG.5Division of BiosciencesA course dealing with the interplay between the forces which contribute to evolutionary change in gene frequencies in populations. Topics covered include genetic polymorphism, natural selection, random changes in evolution, and the genetic basis of speciation, including the genetic processes involved in human evolution. We discuss the maintenance of genetic variability, the role of chance in evolution, the origins of species and theories of evolution beyond the species level. The utility of evolutionary biology in conservation also plays a part. Lecture topics include the effects of mutation, drift and selection (including frequency-dependent, kin and sexual selection), molecular evolution, chromosomal evolution, coevolution, speciation, the evolution of the genome and gene regulation.
PHAR2003Experimental PharmacologyUG1Division of BiosciencesThis is a largely practical course, which is only available to students taking Pharmacology PHAR2002 which aims to develop experimental skills. In addition to a wide range of in-vitro experiments and studies of drug action in humans, the course includes student presentations, sessions to develop computer skills and also visits to research laboratories. Complementary, and only available to, students doing Pharmacology PHAR2002.
PALSG304Experimental PhoneticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the methodology of Experimental Phonetics and its application to contemporary issues in Phonetics.
ANAT3903Extended Experimental ProjectUG1.5Division of BiosciencesLaboratory Research Project.
NEUR3903Extended Experimental ProjectUG1.5Division of BiosciencesNot applicable
BIOL2002Field Course in Environmental BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course includes a field trip to the Scottish Highlands. The course provides an introduction to studying the effects of the environment on aquatic and terrestrial animals and plants. The course will run for two weeks in early June (5th - 16th June 2017) and be split between two sites. During the first part, we will be based in London and do field work on Hampstead Heath. For the second part, we will be travelling to Kindrogan Field Centre in Scotland.
BIOL1004First Year Core SkillsUG0Division of BiosciencesStudents attend a post exam lecture series, Biology and Society, relating to societal issues relating to biology in the wider world (social, political, ethical, careers in biology, and conservation issues) and in key skills (scientific writing and public speaking).
ANAT3026Forensic Osteology and AnthropologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course offers students the opportunity to learn about the role of the dead body in the field of crime and forensic science, initially introducing the student to the recently deceased and discussing how the process of decomposition finally results in skeletal remains. Students will then be introduced to skeletal anatomy and in particular to the forensically relevant skeletal elements that can be used to help identify an individual. Students will have the opportunity to examine human remains both with and without soft tissue, to prepare material for osteological examination and to see how these remains may be involved in helping to solve forensic cases.
ANATG026Forensic Osteology and AnthropologyPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course offers students the opportunity to learn about the role of the dead body in the field of crime and forensic science, initially introducing the student to the recently deceased and discussing how the process of decomposition finally results in skeletal remains. Students will then be introduced to skeletal anatomy and in particular to the forensically relevant skeletal elements that can be used to help identify an individual. Students will have the opportunity to examine human remains both with and without soft tissue, to prepare material for osteological examination and to see how these remains may be involved in helping to solve forensic cases.
PHAYG068Formulation of Natural Products and CosmeceuticalsPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYG063Formulation of Small MoleculesPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX92Formulation ProjectPG30School of Pharmacy
PHAYG102Foundation Stage II (Audit)PG20School of Pharmacy
PHAYG103Foundation Stage II (Service Improvement and Innovation)PG20School of Pharmacy
PHAYG101Foundation Stage II (Therapeutic Review)PG20School of Pharmacy
PHAYG100Foundation Stage OnePG60School of Pharmacy
PLING198Foundations of LinguisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesA selection from the following topics will be covered: Linguistics as a branch of the cognitive sciences The history of modern linguistics Key concepts in theoretical linguistics Different approaches to language acquisition Biological and ethological approaches to language Language vs. communication Mental modularity Natural language and the language of thought
NEUR1005Foundations of NeurobiologyUG1Division of BiosciencesThis course provides an overview on the development, structure and function of the nervous system, from its molecular and cellular components to more complex motor and sensory system functions. It comprises basic concepts of developmental neurobiology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropharmacology that provide an essential foundation for intermediate and higher level courses in molecular, cellular developmental and systems neuroscience. The majority of this module will taught as a combination of lectures and tutorials building on the content delivered in the lecture. There will also be a laboratory component, focused on neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropharmacology, to support the three main blocks of lectures forming the core of the course. This will be assessed using write-ups in the style of short laboratory reports or short-answer questions.]
CELL3002Functional Genetics of Model SystemsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe aim of this module is to provide in depth coverage of new concepts in the molecular genetics of animal model systems, including nematode worms, fruit flies, zebrafish and mouse. Following a refresher on model organism biology and basic genetics, the topics covered will include genetic screening, modern gene mapping techniques, advanced recombinant technology and genome editing, as well as emerging concepts such as chemical genetics and optogenetics. Drawing mainly on recent examples from the primary literature, emphasis will be placed on the use of molecular genetics to tackle wide-ranging questions, from basic biological principles in development and neuroscience to the dissection of disease.
CELLG002Functional Genetics of Model SystemsPG15Division of Biosciences
CELLM002Functional Genetics of Model Systems (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOL1007Fundamentals of BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics covered in lectures and practical exercises include: Water and biodiversity, Extremophiles, Molecular structure and chemistry of water, pH, pK and buffers, Visual signaling: sex, food and status, Photoprotection and photosynthesis, Pigment chemistry, Fluorescence and spectrometry, Photosynthesis and evolution, Green Fluorescent Protein, Comparative biology of ageing, Cellular ageing, Damage and maintenance, Entropy and enthalpy, Free energy and redox potentials, Bioenergetics, Metabolism and ageing, Glycation and oxidative stress.
BIOL1007AFundamentals of BiologyUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOL2012Fundamentals of EcologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesEcology is the study of the factors affecting the distribution and abundance of individuals and species in the natural environment. It is also one of the most quantitative areas of biology. Estimating species abundances when the entire population is sampled; estimating whether or not a species has gone (or is going) extinct; predicting the future abundance and distribution of a species due to climate change -these are all examples of questions which require a combination of mathematics, statistics and data. This course will scale up from individuals, to populations, then to communities and onto ecosystems, and will be taught using a combination of theory and case studies from the scientific literature. Topics covered in detail 1. Population dynamics -density independence 2. Population dynamics of age-structured populations 3. Population dynamics and density dependence 4. The principles of competitive exclusion, coexistence, and founder control 5. The dynamics of predator-prey and host-parasite communities 6. Spatial structure at the individual scale: consequences for competition. 7. Spatial structure at the regional scale: Metapopulations and the importance of habitat fragmentation, dispersal and landscape structure. 8. Food webs: properties, stability and ecosystem services 9. Macro-ecological patterns: the latitudinal gradient of biodiversity; species area curves and diversity indices There will be three computer practicals: 1. Population regulation and age-structure (an Excel-based practical that will involve comparing a discrete time model to data) 2. Stability and instability of host-parasitoid communities (an Excel-based practical that will consider the Nicholson-Bailey and Hassell-Varley models for host-parasitoid communities) 3. Using spatial statistics to infer ecological processes (an R-based practical)
BIOL2004Fundamentals of Molecular BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesIntroduction to DNA. Structure of DNA. DNA as the genetic material. Gene structure and expression. DNA isolation. Restriction / modification enzymes used in molecular biology (ligase, polymerase, kinase, phosphatases, nucleases). DNA analysis. Gel electrophoresis / blotting / labelling DNA. DNA sequencing. Polymerase chain reaction. Cloning vectors. Plasmids, M13, lambda. Applications of DNA technology. A basic introduction to the use of DNA technology in biological research, biotechnology and medicine. eg in situ hybridization, transgenic organisms and production of recombinant proteins; molecular evolution; DNA fingerprinting; functional genomics; the new ‘whole genome’ sequencing technologies; molecular diagnosis of infection / contamination; ancient DNA; phylogenetics.
BIOLG004Fundamentals of Molecular BiologyPG15Division of BiosciencesIntroduction to DNA. Structure of DNA. DNA as the genetic material. Gene structure and expression. DNA isolation. Restriction / modification enzymes used in molecular biology (ligase, polymerase, kinase, phosphatases, nucleases). DNA analysis. Gel electrophoresis / blotting / labelling DNA. DNA sequencing. Polymerase chain reaction. Cloning vectors. Plasmids, M13, lambda. Applications of DNA technology. A basic introduction to the use of DNA technology in biological research, biotechnology and medicine. eg in situ hybridization, transgenic organisms and production of recombinant proteins; molecular evolution; DNA fingerprinting; functional genomics; the new ‘whole genome’ sequencing technologies; molecular diagnosis of infection / contamination; ancient DNA; phylogenetics.
BIOL2004AFundamentals of Molecular Biology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PSYCGT10Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic TheoryPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims at a critical understanding of the main psychoanalytic theories and models of the mind as these developed in the work of Freud. This module introduces an understanding of how the theories developed in conjunction with understanding particular pathologies, such as hysteria, which is at the heart of psychoanalytic theory as originally formulated by Sigmund Freud. It also introduces students to the particular task of understanding the significance of the clinical case report from Freud through to the present day.
BIOC2003AFurther Topics in Biochemistry AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHAY3103Future Design, Delivery and Administration of MedicinesUG1School of Pharmacy
PSYCGI10Future InterfacesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe user interface is now recognized as a design object in its own right. A highly diversified field of user interface design has emerged, encompassing a remarkable variety of interactive technologies used in a near unlimited range of usage situations. Interaction design specialists need to be able to recognize the structural and functional elements of user interfaces in relation to the user's interaction. Understanding the design principles involved in creating effective user interfaces, and familiarity with the seminal user interfaces that guide design, are central to this specialism. The Interfaces and Interactivity module provides an in depth understanding of user interfaces and of the design knowledge that lies behind them. It examines user interfaces for desktop and non-desktop situations, for personal, corporate and specialist users in domains spanning from social computing through to safety critical systems. It surveys the technologies exploited in user interfaces, including multimodality and multimedia, augmented reality, tangibles, and it looks at exemplar user interfaces in which these technologies are deployed. It examines research findings and thinking about user interfaces and the knowledge that practitioners apply in creating user interfaces. It examines the contributions of creative and engineering design to user interfaces within a systems development context where user interface design collaborates with software engineering. It considers the user interfaces we may expect to see in the future as well as some of the most influential interfaces of the past. With its substantive focus on the user interface as designed object, the module complements the learning about design and evaluation methods gained in term 1, and the understanding of users and organisations gained in term 2. The module is arranged as a series of lectures in the morning sessions, and in the afternoons, as seminar-based discussion of selected readings, online research and presentation, and small scale on-line design investigations.
PHAR2002General and Systematic PharmacologyUG1Division of BiosciencesA comprehensive lecture course designed for students of Pharmacology, Natural Sciences (Biomedical Sciences stream) and Biomedical Sciences (Drug Mechanisms). The course covers the mechanisms of action and uses of the major groups of drugs and important aspects of pharmacokinetics and drug toxicity. Students must have a sound knowledge of physiology and biochemistry.
PHAR2002AGeneral and Systematic Pharmacology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC2008General Biochemistry of HealthUG.5Division of BiosciencesBIOC2008: General Biochemistry of Health is the follow-on course to BIOC1008: General Biochemistry. Successful completion of BIOC2008 will permit registration in any of the BIOC Year 3 "Health & Disease" modules (BIOC2012, BIOC3013 and BIOC3017).
BIOCG028General Biochemistry of HealthPG15Division of Biosciences
BIOC2008AGeneral Biochemistry of Health AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PSYCGR14Generic Research Skills (Key Skills Portfolio)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThese seminars give students grounding in the skills necessary to complete the programme. These skills are developed through workshop-style seminars, the conduct of practical tasks, and constructive peer evaluation. Students' skills are assessed by their application in project work, and by the compilation of a portfolio of work, which includes: a web page, copies of a PowerPoint presentation and a poster. The module ends with a conference in the summer in which students present some of their research (attendance at the conference is a course requirement, but the presentation is not assessed).
PSYCGR16Generic Research Skills (Qualitative Analysis)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces the main data-sources and analysis methods used in qualitative research. In addition to covering the key conceptual issues, a computer package for qualitative analysis is taught, as are further methods for data analysis. Students emerge with the skill of using a textual data analysis package. The strengths and limitations of various techniques are evaluated, with an eye to issues such as reliability and validity. The specific criteria used for evaluation of qualitative work are examined, as is its scientific status. The course combines lectures and practical work, and is assessed by a qualitative analysis.
PSYCGR01Generic Research Skills (Statistics)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides a thorough introduction to the General Linear Model, which incorporates analyses such as multiple regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA. We will also cover extensions to linear mixed-effects models and logistic regression. All techniques will be discussed within a general framework of building and comparing statistical models. Practical experience in applying the methods will be developed through exercises with the statistics package SPSS.
PSYCGR10Generic Research Skills (Statistics)PG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides a thorough introduction to the General Linear Model, which incorporates analyses such as multiple regression, ANOVA, ANCOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA. We will also cover extensions to linear mixed-effects models and logistic regression. All techniques will be discussed within a general framework of building and comparing statistical models. Practical experience in applying the methods will be developed through exercises with the statistics package SPSS
PSYC3307Genes and BehaviourUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will provide a good overall understanding of the contribution of behavioural genetics research to the understanding of psychopathology and cognitive development. Various methods used in behavioural genetics research will be overviewed. Particular emphasis is given to how genetically informative study designs can be used to understand the way in which both genetic and environmental risk operates. The course will also cover the ethical implications of behavioural genetic research.
PSYC3307AGenes and Behaviour AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3307
BIOCG016Genes to DiseasePG15Division of Biosciences
BIOS3016Genes to DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesPlease note that lectures take place on Tuesdays 9am - 11am and Friday 11am - 1pm during weeks 5 - 15.
BIOSM016Genes to Disease (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesPlease note that lectures take place on Tuesdays 9am - 11am and Friday 11am - 1pm during weeks 5 - 15.
BIOL2005Genetic SystemsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course aims to give students a detailed introduction to the major plant, animal and fungal models used to study eukaryotic genetics. Genetic model systems range from unicellular eukaryotes (yeasts and algae); to invertebrates (Drosophila and C. elegans); non-human vertebrates (zebrafish and mice) and higher plants (Arabidopsis). Methods of genetic analysis used to study these organisms include both classical (e.g. linkage mapping, mutant generation and screening) and molecular (e.g. transformation, transgenesis, the impact of large scale genome projects, comparative and reverse genetics) techniques. The advantages of particular models for different types of study (the genetics of obesity, mitochondrial function, programmed cell death, ras signalling, and eye development) will be discussed.
GENEG002Genetics of Cardiovascular and Related Complex DiseasesPG15Division of BiosciencesThis module will provide a background to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other related complex diseases and outline how genetics contributes to the development of these common disorders. The study of both polygenic and monogenic forms of the diseases will be outlined and how genetics may assist in CVD risk prediction in the future and personalised drug treatment. The content of the module is as follows: - Global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its genetic epidemiology. - Candidate gene approaches and genome wide association studies on CVD. - Genetic testing for CVD and the gene-environment interaction in determining disease risk. - The genetics of type 2 diabetes, MODY, hypertension, stroke and aortic abdominal aneurism, FH, cardiomyopathies and congenital heart disease. - Statistical analysis and scanning for complex disease genotypes and phenotypes - Using genetics to determine causality and the role of transcription factors in complex disease development - Personalised Medicine and translating genetics of disease into clinical practice
GENEM002Genetics of Cardiovascular and Related Complex Diseases (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will provide a background to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other related complex diseases and outline how genetics contributes to the development of these common disorders. The study of both polygenic and monogenic forms of the diseases will be outlined and how genetics may assist in CVD risk prediction in the future and personalised drug treatment. The content of the module is as follows: - Global burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its genetic epidemiology. - Candidate gene approaches and genome wide association studies on CVD. - Genetic testing for CVD and the gene-environment interaction in determining disease risk. - The genetics of type 2 diabetes, MODY, hypertension, stroke and aortic abdominal aneurism, FH, cardiomyopathies and congenital heart disease. - Statistical analysis and scanning for complex disease genotypes and phenotypes - Using genetics to determine causality and the role of transcription factors in complex disease development - Personalised Medicine and translating genetics of disease into clinical practice
GENEG003Genetics of Neurological DiseasePG15Division of BiosciencesDisorders of the nervous system are common and disabling. Although individually rare, cumulatively, Mendelian disorders affecting the nervous system function constitute a significant disease burden. Moreover huge insights have been gained by the study of the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders. In some instances whole new fields of genetic and molecular pathology have been elucidated (e.g. triplet repeat disorders). Genetics has also contributed to our understanding of a range of neurodegenerative conditions including common disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In fact there is no branch of neurology that has not had a direct and often dramatic impact of discovery of genetic defects. This situation is likely to continue with the technological advances allowing whole genome mapping for common traits. This module will give the students a background in the principal Mendelian diseases of the nervous system. The emphasis will be on providing them with a template to which they can add the emerging and rapidly changing genetic and molecular discoveries. Finally it will introduce the role of complex trait genetics in neurological disease which will tie in with other modules within the MSc.
GENEM003Genetics of Neurological Disease (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences Disorders of the nervous system are common and disabling. Although individually rare, cumulatively, Mendelian disorders affecting the nervous system function constitute a significant disease burden. Moreover huge insights have been gained by the study of the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders. In some instances whole new fields of genetic and molecular pathology have been elucidated (e.g. triplet repeat disorders). Genetics has also contributed to our understanding of a range of neurodegenerative conditions including common disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In fact there is no branch of neurology that has not had a direct and often dramatic impact of discovery of genetic defects. This situation is likely to continue with the technological advances allowing whole genome mapping for common traits. This module will give the students a background in the principal Mendelian diseases of the nervous system. The emphasis will be on providing them with a template to which they can add the emerging and rapidly changing genetic and molecular discoveries. Finally it will introduce the role of complex trait genetics in neurological disease which will tie in with other modules within the MSc.
PSYCGR11Group ProjectsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis is the central component of the programme. It involves practical applications of the skills acquired in the other components of the course. • Over the first two terms, students design, execute, analyse, and report two group projects, working in small groups of three-five students. These are supported by tutorials in which students present their hypotheses and designs for critical group discussion prior to carrying out the studies. • The first group project is a course requirement, but doesn't contribute marks. Each group collectively analyses the data and writes up the report. The report is then peer-reviewed and, if necessary, revised in the light of that review. The second group project is individually analysed and written up. The report is then marked in the usual way to give the final mark for the module. • Over the rest of the year, students conduct their main research project. The main Project can be carried out at institutions outside the department by arrangement, and under departmental academic supervision.
PSYC2206Health and Clinical PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesDescription: The first part of this course aims to introduce the major theories of the aetiology of psychological and psychiatric disorders, and review research on the treatment of these disorders. The second part examines the major theoretical perspectives and empirical research on the role of psychological and social factors in the aetiology of disease. The course begins with two introductory lectures, one examining medical models and treatments of 'mental illness', the other examining psychological and social models of psychiatric disorders. The course includes a series of lectures on anxiety disorders, depression and schizophrenia. Individual lectures focus on eating disorders, PTSD, personality disorder, psychopathology which has no medical explanation and drug use/abuse. Themes running through most of the course include both theories and treatments of disorders from biological, cognitive-behavioural, social and psychoanalytic viewpoints. The second half of the course covers the role of psychological, social and behavioural factors in the onset and maintenance of disease. Three initial lectures draw on social psychological theory to outline determinants of health behaviour. Nine subsequent lectures address applications of psychology to the understanding, prevention and treatment of ill-health. Individual lectures focus on pain, screening for health risks, psychological influences on and responses to serious illness, sexual health, and smoking.
PSYC2206AHealth and Clinical Psychology AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC2206
PHOL3002Heart and CirculationUG1Division of BiosciencesThe course builds upon your primary knowledge of the heart and circulation. Essential aspects of cardiac and vascular physiology will be considered. This will enable you to grasp a number of areas of experimental, applied and patho-physiology.
PHOLG043Heart and CirculationPG30Division of BiosciencesThe course builds upon your primary knowledge of the heart and circulation. Essential aspects of cardiac and vascular physiology will be considered. This will enable you to grasp a number of areas of experimental, applied and patho-physiology.
PHOLM002Heart and Circulation (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciences The course builds upon your primary knowledge of the heart and circulation. Essential aspects of cardiac and vascular physiology will be considered. This will enable you to grasp a number of areas of experimental, applied and patho-physiology.
PHOL3002AHeart and Circulation AUG1Division of BiosciencesThe course builds upon your primary knowledge of the heart and circulation. Essential aspects of cardiac and vascular physiology will be considered. This will enable you to grasp a number of areas of experimental, applied and patho-physiology.
ANAT2050Human Anatomy and EmbryologyUG1Division of BiosciencesA module of human anatomy, histology and embryology that covers the structure and development of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and urinogenital systems (term 1), and the head and neck, vertebral column and limbs (term 2). Clinical and comparative aspects are introduced as appropriate so as to draw out the relationship between structure and function. Lectures are supplemented by practical demonstration sessions in the Dissecting Room. It is also possible to take either the first half of the module (Term 1: Thorax, abdomen, pelvis) as ANAT2051 (0.5 unit) or the second half of the module (Term 2: head and neck, back, limbs) as ANAT2052 (0.5 unit). Note that the half unit options are lecture only (no practicals) and it is NOT possible to take both half units within a single academic year. Year 3 students may take the half unit options.
ANAT2052Human Anatomy and Embryology (Head and Limbs)UG.5Division of BiosciencesA module of human anatomy, histology and embryology that covers the structure and development of the head and neck, vertebral column and limbs. Clinical and comparative aspects are introduced as appropriate so as to draw out the relationship between structure and function.
ANAT2051Human Anatomy and Embryology (Thorax, Abdomen and Pelvis)UG.5Division of BiosciencesA module of human anatomy, histology and embryology that covers the structure and development of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and urinogenital systems. Clinical and comparative aspects are introduced as appropriate so as to draw out the relationship between structure and function.
ANAT2051AHuman Anatomy and Embryology (Thorax, Abdomen and Pelvis) AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PSYCGI18Human Factors for Digital HealthPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOLG011Human Genetics in ContextPG15Division of BiosciencesGenetic and environmental variation affects all complex human traits and disorders. However, which variants affect us and how they have their effects depends on the environmental, developmental and evolutionary context. For example, some genetic effects may be apparent only in childhood, only in the centre of large cities, or only when we are exposed to certain pathogens. In addition, human genetics is not studied in a vacuum: it is influenced by and influences human society. This module builds on the Advanced Human Genetics 1: Basic Principles module to introduce the burning issues in the science of human genetics, how context affects our genomes, and how discoveries in human genetics are affecting our society.
BIOLM011Human Genetics in Context (Masters level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module builds on the Advanced Human Genetics module to introduce the burning issues in the science of human genetics, and how discoveries in human genetics are affecting our society. Lectures will be given by several experts currently working on a variety of important and timely topics, including population genetics, model organisms, eQTLs, infectious disease, genomic imprinting and complex diseases. The course will highlight some of the major fields of study within human genetics today, discussing statistical techniques used to model these biological questions and the major, up-to-date insights such methods have provided.
GENEG001Human Genetics: Core SkillsPG15Division of BiosciencesThe Core Skills Module consists of bite size topics covering’ life skills’ which will aid the rest of the MSc as well as touching on topics related to human disease in context of research and governance.
PSYC3207Human Learning and MemoryUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module covers major current topics in the study of human learning and memory, including: short-term memory and brain plasticity; encoding processes; consolidation; implicit learning; reliability of long-term memory; memory and the self; metamemory, forgetting and retrieval; aging and dementia; transfer-appropriate processing; memory systems and the neuroscience of memory.
PSYCG207Human Learning and MemoryPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3207 on the module database
PSYCM207Human Learning and Memory (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3207
PSYC3207AHuman Learning and Memory AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3207
ANAT2010Human NeuroanatomyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThere is a bias towards medically relevant information and the material covered is broadly similar to that in the neuroanatomy section of the medical curriculum. The first part of the course is an overview of the structure and function of the various regions of the CNS, its blood supply, and the cerebrospinal fluid. This is followed by a series of lectures that cover the major somatosensory and motor pathways, the thalamus, the cerebellum, the basal ganglia, the cerebral cortex, the limbic system, the control of autonomic and endocrine functions, and special sense pathways. There are also lectures on how movements are controlled, learning and memory, the biological basis of neurodegenerative disease, and regeneration in the nervous system. The course provides sufficient neuroanatomical background for students to take any of the third year Neuroscience courses offered by the Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology. Practical work involves examining brains in the dissecting room
PSYC3111Human-Computer InteractionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesLecture topics include: learning to use devices; expert interactive behaviour; human error; searching for information on the web; evaluating systems.
PSYC3111AHuman-Computer Interaction AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3111
PHAYG060Initiating a Pharmaceutical Start-UpPG15School of Pharmacy
CELL2008Integrative Cell BiologyUG1Division of BiosciencesThis 1-unit course is a combination of two 0.5 unit courses CELL2006 Cell Biology (= CELL2008 part 1) and CELL2007 The Principles of Cellular Control (= CELL2008 part 2)- for information you should also study the database entries describing these two courses. CELL2008 explicitly fuses the contents of CELL2006 and CELL2007 in order to emphasise the importance of integrating the insights obtained in each. Consequently CELL2008 will teach you the major areas of contemporary cell biology including the mechanistics of cell signal transduction at an intermediate level in order to provide a foundation for more specialised third year courses. CELL2008 begins with a new broad-based study of eukaryotic cell biology that introduces how different parts of the cell are formed and function, and how one cell differs from another. In the second half of the course a detailed study of cell signalling mechanisms establishes a fusion between molecular-scale concepts with macroscopic biology. Coursework forms an important part of your study and is designed to illustrate specific cellular processes and techniques in greater detail. As with CELL2007 the course contains a compulsory one-week laboratory component (during either the November or February reading week - see below) that will provide a hands-on introduction to; 1/ Techniques of mammalian cell culture, propagation and transfection with foreign DNA; 2/ Fluorescent and visible light microscopy; 3/ The deduction of the organisation of signaling pathways through epigenetic study of C. elegans with mutations in genes coding signaling proteins; 4/ The application of basic bioinformatics to studies of signalling molecules. The maximum number of places on the course is 120.
PSYCGI17Interaction DesignPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGI21Interaction SciencePG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
CELL3140Interdisciplinary Cell BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module is targeted at students on broad or interdisciplinary degree programmes who have a wide scientific outlook. The intention is that learners should come to recognize the breadth of modern cell biological research. The module emphasises the relationship between the chemical scale and more complex levels of organisation in cells, and the balance of interactions required for cellular function. It explicitly recognises the different understandings of cell biology in different branches of biosciences including virology and microbiology in health and disease.
PLING223Interfaces in SyntaxPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course deals with one or more topics that involve the interface between the syntax and a syntax-external system. The latter could be the interpretive system, the phonology, or the parser. The exact contents of the course change from year to year, to reflect developments in the field and the lecturer\'s own research. However, the course will always involve the reading of recent research papers, class presentations by students, the writing of an individual research project, and of an essay that reports on the outcomes of that project.
PLIN2202Intermediate Generative Grammar AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course offers an intermediate-level introduction to the issue of locality in generative syntax.
PLING221Intermediate Generative Grammar APG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course offers an intermediate-level introduction to the issue of locality in generative syntax.
PLIN2203Intermediate Generative Grammar BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides a mid-level introduction to generative grammar, with a special emphasis on theories that regulate word order. These include proposals that restrict syntactic combination (such as X-bar theory, antisymmetry, and so on), theories that regulate the distribution of arguments (case and theta-theory) and theories that regulate the distribution of adverbials (such as the hierarchies that determine the relative order of adverbials).
PLING226Intermediate Generative Grammar BPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides a mid-level introduction to generative grammar, with a special emphasis on theories that regulate word order. These include proposals that restrict syntactic combination (such as X-bar theory, antisymmetry, and so on), theories that regulate the distribution of arguments (case and theta-theory) and theories that regulate the distribution of adverbials (such as the hierarchies that determine the relative order of adverbials).
PHAR2007Intermediate PharmacologyUG1Division of BiosciencesA comprehensive lecture course designed for students from biomedical programmes including Neuroscience, Physiology, Physiology/Pharmacology (joint), Natural Sciences (Biomedical Sciences stream) and Medicinal Chemistry. The course covers the mechanisms of action and uses of the major groups of drugs and important aspects of pharmacokinetics and drug toxicity. Students must have a sound knowledge of physiology and biochemistry. The course is co-taught with PHAR2002 General and Systematic Pharmacology, which is aimed at the specialist Pharmaocology programmes and Biomedical/Natural Sciences streams. Intermediate Pharmacology differs only in the nature of the coursework assessments – the essay assignments will be replaced by a data analysis paper.
PLIN2108Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module forms the first half of an intermediate-level curriculum in language sound structure (the second half being formed by PLIN2109 Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology B). The course builds on the foundations laid by PLIN1101 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology A and PLIN1102 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology B (or equivalent first-level courses). It discusses fundamental theoretical and empirical questions arising from the scientific study of spoken linguistic communication. It provides participants with hands-on experience of analysing phonetic data. It introduces modern experimental techniques in the study of Phonetics and modern applications of Phonetic science.
PLING216Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology APG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module forms the first half of an intermediate-level curriculum in language sound structure (the second half being formed by PLING217 Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology B). The course builds on the foundations laid by PLING113 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology A and Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology B (or equivalent first-level courses). It discusses fundamental theoretical and empirical questions arising from the scientific study of spoken linguistic communication. It provides participants with hands-on experience of analysing phonetic data. It introduces modern experimental techniques in the study of Phonetics and modern applications of Phonetic science.
PLIN2109Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module forms the second half of an intermediate-level curriculum in language sound structure (the first half being formed by PLIN2108 Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology A). It builds on the foundations laid by PLIN1101 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology A and PLIN1102 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology B (or equivalent first-level courses). It discusses fundamental theoretical and empirical questions arising from the scientific study of languages' sound systems. It provides participants with hands-on experience of analysing phonetic and phonological data.
PLING217Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology BPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module forms the second half of an intermediate-level curriculum in language sound structure (the first half being formed by PLING216 Intermediate Phonetics and Phonology A). The course builds on the foundations laid by PLING113 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology A and B (or equivalent first-level courses). It discusses fundamental theoretical and empirical questions arising from the scientific study of languages' sound systems. It provides participants with hands-on experience of analysing phonetic and phonological data
PHAYG040International Perspectives on HealthPG30School of Pharmacy
PSYCGN69Interpersonal Psychotherapy for AdolescentsPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
ANAT1003Introduction to Anatomy and DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesANAT1003 is an introductory module in human anatomy and developmental biology (embryology). The module will cover topographical anatomy and development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs. It will also provide an understanding of the basic principles of embryonic development and the formation of the major organs. The module will be taught by lectures and a series of seminars covering more specialised topics. A visit to the UCL Anatomy Laboratory (Dissecting Room) is included in the module, but is not compulsory.
ANAT1003AIntroduction to Anatomy and DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesANAT1003 is an introductory module in human anatomy and developmental biology (embryology). The module will cover topographical anatomy and development of the nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, and limbs. It will also provide an understanding of the basic principles of embryonic development and the formation of the major organs. The module will be taught by lectures and a series of seminars covering more specialised topics. A visit to the UCL Anatomy Laboratory (Dissecting Room) is included in the module, but is not compulsory.
PSYCG110Introduction to CBT in ContextPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge of CBT and developing therapy skills. For theory and knowledge, this module will cover a basic introduction to cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), and its applications with children and young people. It will also provide an introduction to the basic framework of CBT which involves the relationship of thoughts, feelings and behaviour. For skills development, the module will focus on introducing the CBT competency framework, clarifying ethical aspects of practice and will introduce the core practice of formulation.
CELL1002Introduction to Cell BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesStructure and function of biological membranes, membrane trafficking, protein targeting, eukaryotic cytoskeleton, cell motility, intracellular transport (motor proteins), mitosis and the cell cycle, multi-cellularity and cell signaling, cell death, cancer, signaling through ion channels, electrical signaling, signaling through receptors, histology and primary tissue types, muscle and blood vessels, the gastrointestinal tract, introduction to viruses, how viruses replicate, viruses and disease, control and prevention of viral infections. Lectures will be the main method of delivering module content. These will be supported by Moodle, with lecture slides provided before the lectures. There will also be both a wet-lab and an online practical. Detailed feedback will be taken at the end of term and fed back into the module delivery and design.
PLIN1601Introduction to Children's Language DevelopmentUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAfter introducing language acquisition as a theoretical issue, the course will concentrate on empirical evidence of the nature and effects of input to children, and the nature of children\'s language production and comprehension at different stages, including discussion of the processes by which language is acquired.
PLIN1601AIntroduction to Children's Language DevelopmentUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesApart from the method of assessment, this module is identical to PLIN1601, see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lifesciences-faculty-php/courses/search.php?action=single&coursecode=PLIN1601
PLING159Introduction to Children's Language DevelopmentPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAfter introducing language acquisition as a theoretical issue, the course will concentrate on empirical evidence of the nature and effects of input to children, and the nature of children's language production and comprehension at different stages, including discussion of the processes by which language is acquired.
PSYCGD01Introduction to Cognitive SciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course introduces basic issues in the philosophy of mind that are relevant to research in psychology. Topics will include: Causation; Dualism, Functionalism, Identity Theories; Computational Models of the Mind; Mental Causation; Theories of Consciousness and Free will.
PALSG309Introduction to DeafhoodPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module introduces students to the new concept of Deafhood and the other key concepts which form part of Deafhood praxis ; the medical, social and culturo-linguistic models of deafness, Deaf epistemologies and ontologies, post-colonialism, and subalternism, and the lay persons concept, situating these within an introduction to Western Deaf history as viewed through a Deafhood lens. Module will be taught face to face in British Sign Language via BSL/English interpretation for non-signing students. Each session will consist of lecture and discussion. Session notes will be available online.
PSYCG114Introduction to Disorder Specific ApproachesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module has two components in relation to disorder specific approaches in CBT with children, young people and families, namely learning about the basic theory and knowledge and developing therapy skills. It will also consider research and practice in relation to outcomes. It will give an overview on disorder specific practice with this population, and specifically focus on interventions with anxiety, anger and aggression, and aim to develop CBT skills with these presenting difficulties.
PALSG307Introduction to Event-Related Potential TechniquesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module will provide a practical introduction to the event-related potential (ERP) technique. The lectures cover basic aspects of the event-related potential technique to investigate sensory, motor and cognitive processes with respect to theoretical and methodological issues in designing, recording, analysing and interpreting EEG data. Advanced techniques on pre-processing and analysis of EEG data will also be introduced. The module is mainly aimed at but not restricted to students studying MSc Language Sciences and MRES Speech Language and Cognition. The module consists of 10 one-hour lectures followed by 10 two-hour workshops focussing on practical exercises on the lecture topics.
PLIN1201Introduction To Generative Grammar AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an introduction to the formal study of the syntax of natural language.
  • It introduces students to some of the basic descriptive problems and theoretical tools of modern syntactic theory
  • It introduces students to the broad questions driving research in generative syntax.
  • It familiarizes students with the scientific process.
PLIN1201AIntroduction To Generative Grammar AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN1202Introduction To Generative Grammar BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course complements PLIN1201. It introduces students to several properties of "mental grammar" (the system of rules that determines a speaker/hearer's language).
BIOL1005Introduction to GeneticsUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn introduction to the genetics of a variety of creatures from peas to humans. Mendelism, linkage, genetic ratios, linkage maps, chromosomes, mitochondrial inheritance, mutation, quantitative genetics, family structure, evolutionary genetics and natural selection.
BIOL2006Introduction to Human GeneticsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course introduces the subject of human genetics, to enable students to appreciate the implications of genetic research for society and also to provide a basis for more advanced studies. The unifying topic of this course is how genes and their interactions, either with other genes or with the environment, make us what we are. When these interactions break down genetic disease may result, and it is often through these genetic mistakes that we are able to work out what happens in the normal situation. First comes a reminder that Mendelian rules of inheritance can be applied to human families but that this is not always straightforward to interpret. Not all traits are inherited in a simple Mendelian fashion and the methods by which quantitative and multifactorial traits are studied are introduced. These methods are followed by a section on molecular genetics which continues into genetic mapping techniques which culminated in the multi billion dollar human genome project. Within this section we examine some of the better known human genetic diseases which are interesting both for their own sake but also as examples of the results obtained using the molecular methods discussed earlier. One week is spent considering chromosomes. The human genome project has now moved on from the study of �the� human DNA sequence to the study of variation between individuals and populations. The existence of genetic variation, polymorphism, has been known for many years and we look at this both from a historical perspective as well as considering how this is of interest to medicine and to the pharmaceutical industry. The fourth week of the course considers the nature and origin of genetic variation and gives a historical outline of the human genome project. In the fifth week we consider cancer, the biggest problem of genetic disease and finally we look at the study of human populations.
BIOL2006AIntroduction to Human Genetics AUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOS1001Introduction to Human SciencesUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn introductory module in human sciences that will provide an understanding of the basic principles of biosciences as applied to humans. Topics will include biochemistry, cell biology, evolutionary biology, genetics, health and diseases, and molecular biology.
PLIN1302Introduction to LanguageUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the main areas of linguistics, including the application of scientific methodology in linguistics.
PLIN1302AIntroduction to Language AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOC1010Introduction to MicrobiologyUG.5Division of Biosciences
NEUR1004Introduction to NeuroscienceUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis seminar-based 0.5 CU module is mandatory for Year 1 students on the BSc and MSci Neuroscience degree programmes and is not available to other students. The size of the group allows much of the teaching to be informal and interactive. Background reading, oral presentation and the submission of written work are major and important components. Regular participation in seminars and the making of an oral presentation to the group are module requirements, and the written work also forms part of the assessment scheme.
PSYCGN24Introduction to Neuroscience MethodsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module presents an introduction to a range of methods for studying the brain and cognitive and affective processing, including: fMRI, EEG, PET, Neuropsychology, TMS, and Neuropsychoanalysis.
PLIN1101Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introductory course in phonetics, including lab work, transcription and aural/oral practice.
PLIN1102Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesA continuation of PLINP101. The course introduces the concept of phonemic transcription and discusses the features of connected speech in English. Teature representations of segments are introduced and the concept of formal phonological rules and underlying representations are discussed. An introduction to acoustics and speech perception.
PSYC1103Introduction To Psychological ExperimentationUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesDescription: In this course students are introduced to the various experimental methods used in the different disciplines of Psychology. In each session, students participate in experiments and then the experimental design and procedure are discussed and the data collected. The analysed data are then provided to the students in a report-back session. Students are required to write 6 laboratory reports and these form the basis for the assessment.
PSYC6002Introduction to PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAlthough this module is designed as an introduction for students in the Biological Sciences, it also forms a general introduction to psychology for all students seeking an elective module in psychology. The module consists of a selection of key topics in psychology, with emphasis on biological aspects of psychology and on cognitive psychology. The module also includes an introduction to psychological experiments. By the end of the module students should know what kinds of topics are addressed in psychology, have basic knowledge of several key areas in psychology and have an idea how psychological research is conducted. Topics covered may include: Motivation, Emotion, Hunger, Pain, Stress, Sleep, Action, Love and Attachment, Decision Making, Memory, Cognition, Attention and Perception, Learning, Intelligence, Mental Illness
BIOL3005Introduction to ResearchUG1.5Division of BiosciencesThe course provides the opportunity to undertake an individual research project of 9 weeks duration (including writing the assessed report) under supervision. Projects can be based on experimental research, field work, theoretical or data analysis. You will develop skills in designing experiments, framing questions, and, where relevant, planning the details and implementing the practical work. You will also receive guidance on assessing results and on presenting the project in both written and verbal form. You will also be expected to read relevant literature.
PALS1006Introduction to Research MethodsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents learn the principles of research methodology in addition to basic descriptive and inferential statistics (bivariate correlation, simple linear regression, t-tests and their nonparametric versions). The use of a statistical computing programme, SPSS, is introduced at the outset of the Term. There are no prerequisites for this course. The mathematical content of this course is minimal and we use computers for all but the simplest calculations.
PLIN1001Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an introduction to the study of meaning in natural language and to some basic logical concepts and their application in semantics and pragmatics.
PLIN1001AIntroduction to Semantics and Pragmatics AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN1002Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is a continued introduction to the study of meaning in formalized and natural languages (from PLIN1001)
PSYC6001Introduction to Social and Business PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe aim of this course is to give non-psychology students an understanding of the issues, theories and methods on business psychology. The history, philosophy and methodology of this particular branch of psychology will be discussed, as well as how business psychology is applied in organisations.
PALS1004Introduction to Speech ScienceUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will introduce the concepts, methods and terminology essential to the scientific study of spoken language. It will cover the phonetic description of speech production, the quantitative analysis of speech sounds, and sources of variation and variety in speech. Topic will include: • Introduction to the structure & function of the larynx and vocal tract • Introduction to concepts and terminology of articulatory phonetics • Introduction to the phonology of English words and sentences • Audio recording of speech • Acoustic analysis of speech signals • Variation and variety of speech sounds
PALSG206Introduction to Speech SciencesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module provides an introduction to the acoustics of speech production, acoustical analysis of speech, speech perception, and experimental techniques to examine speech perception. The course is taught by a one-hour lecture each week, followed by a 1.5 hour laboratory (7 weeks) or tutorial session (3 weeks).
PSYC1104Introduction to Statistical Methods in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe aims of this course are to give students a grounding in a variety of descriptive and inferential statistical methods commonly used in Psychology. The course also provides a foundation for the more advanced 2204 course, and gives students the necessary statistical knowledge required for the 1103 laboratory course. Students are also introduced to computer-based statistical analysis (Minitab). The topics covered in the course are: Basic Statistical Concepts; Scales of Measurement; Research Designs; Frequency Distributions, Bar Charts and Scattergrams; Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion; Parameter Estimation; Linear Transformations and Standard Scores, The Normal Distribution and Z Scores; Probability; Contingency Tables; The Binomial Distribution; Hypothesis Testing; t-Tests; Analysis of Variance; Simple Linear Regression; Correlation; Chi-square.
PALSG101Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the BrainPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesModule overview The module will introduce students to the central nervous system and to the functional localization of different parts of the brain. Particular emphasis will be placed on brain structures known to be involved in language processing. Students will learn about the different imaging technologies currently in use (MRI, fMRI, EEG, MEG, TES and TMS) along with the classical lesion method. Their relative strengths and weaknesses; the principles upon which they are based; the research designs employed by them; and the interpretation of data derived from their use. The module will be taught by researchers who are experts in their field.
PALSG205Introductory British Sign LanguagePG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAR2005Introductory PharmacologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesTo provide students with a knowledge of the actions and uses of a range of important drugs with an emphasis on the mechanisms of action.
PHAYG053Investigative PharmacologyPG30School of PharmacyThis module will focus on teaching theoretical basis and traditional and advanced experimental approaches in pharmacology. It will introduce quantitative principles that underlie the study of the action of drugs through receptors. The molecular nature of receptors will be considered in detail and a critical and quantitative approach to the analysis and interpretation of pharmacological data will be developed. Further, application of modern cell biological and fluorescent techniques in receptor pharmacology will be considered. Finally, neurotransmitter release mechanisms, calcium homeostasis and secondary messenger cascades will be examined experimentally.
BIOCM027Investigative Project in Health and Disease (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesStudents will investigate a disease selected by an academic member of SMB staff as being of relevance to their research interests. The supervisor will assess the student’s performance during the course of the investigation. A written report will be submitted and marked by two academic members of staff familiar with the research area.
PLIN3001Issues in PragmaticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course addresses current debates within the field of pragmatics from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science, linguistics and the philosophy of language. The specific topics may vary from year to year, but will fall within the following areas: the linguistic underdeterminacy of speaker meaning, the semantics/ pragmatics interface, pragmatic processes contributing to truth-conditional content, minimalist versus contextualist semantics, the role of context and the role of speaker intentions, similarities and differences in the aims of semantic theories and communication theories, relevance theory, lexical pragmatics and the nature of word meaning, the role of pragmatics in the interpretation of specific kinds of texts (e.g. legal texts, literary texts).
PLING204Issues in PragmaticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course addresses current debates within the field of pragmatics from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science, linguistics and the philosophy of language. The specific topics may vary from year to year, but will fall within the following areas: the linguistic underdeterminacy of speaker meaning, the semantics/ pragmatics interface, pragmatic processes contributing to truth-conditional content, minimalist versus contextualist semantics, the role of context and the role of speaker intentions, similarities and differences in the aims of semantic theories and communication theories, relevance theory, lexical pragmatics and the nature of word meaning, the role of pragmatics in the interpretation of specific kinds of texts (e.g. legal texts, literary texts).
PSYCGD03Judgment and Decision-MakingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will introduce normative and descriptive models of judgments and choice. Formal models will include the axioms of probability, Bayesian networks, decision theory and game theory. The classic violations of these normative models will be critically discussed, in particular probability biases and choice anomalies. Current psychological models of judgment and choice will be presented, including heuristics and biases; prospect theory; sampling approaches; and the role of emotion in decision making. These will be evaluated and linked with more general principles of cognition.
PSYCGD04Knowledge, Learning and InferencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module introduces the range of computational formalism and methods that are currently used in the cognitive sciences. These will include Bayesian methods, symbolic approaches from artificial intelligence, machine learning techniques, and neural networks. The course will also show how these techniques can be applied to explain specific cognitive phenomena, by describing a range of current computational models. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own simple computational models of cognitive processes.
PALS3009Laboratory Methods in Phonetics and Speech ScienceUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the methodology of Experimental Phonetics and its application to contemporary issues in Phonetics.
PHAR3010Laboratory Research ProjectUG1.5Division of BiosciencesLaboratory Research Project
PLING156Language AcquisitionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces students to the scientific study of how language is acquired by typically developing children, with special reference to the period after the onset of syntax, at around 2 years.
PSYC2208Language and CognitionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module explores how the human mind and brain is able to understand and produce language in order to communicate. In addition to looking at the language abilities of healthy adults, we also look at language processing of users of different languages and within patients with language deficits and at the theories that have been developed to explain these remarkable abilities. We explore how these linguistic abilities relate to our other cognitive abilities, including cognition, perception, action and social interaction, as well as how they relate to other modes of communication such as gesture.
PSYC3213Language in ContextUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesLanguage has typically been studied as a set of isolated units (like phonemes) and levels of linguistic analysis (like syntax), divorced from the ecological settings in which it is used. In contrast, this module examines language from a usage perspective, as a cognitive and social process embedded in a multimodal world. Topics include face­to­face communication, “nonverbal” behaviour (like the impact of co­speech gestures and posture), social aspects of language use, and the relationship between language processing and other aspects of cognition, perception and action. These topics are considered from all levels of analysis, but with an emphasis on cognitive, social and neuroscientific approaches to the question of how communication is achieved, how it breaks down in disorders of language, and how it relates to other aspects of human cognition. This module will not be a series of lectures; instead we will be exploring these issues by reading primary research articles and active, student-led and instructor-moderated discussion.
PHAR3009Library Research ProjectUG1Division of BiosciencesLibrary Project
BIOL1006Life on EarthUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will begin by discussing the evidence for the emergence of life, the origins of the solar system and the conditions under which life emerged and the origin of eukaryotic cells. The theory behind reconstructing trees of evolutionary relatedness will be introduced and patterns of relatedness in the living world discussed, ranging from familiar creatures to new and bizarre forms being discovered in the depths of the oceans and under the earth’s surface. All 5 kingdoms of life will be covered with a particular focus on the evolution of plants and their importance to global biodiversity and on the many groups of invertebrates and vertebrates including ourselves.
BIOL1006ALife on Earth AUG.5Division of Biosciences
SLANG105Linguistic and Psychological PerspectivesPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses knowledge and skills relating to linguistics and typical and atypical language and psychological development. It equips students to carry out analyses of language data with an eye to data from children and adults with language impairments. It links closely with other modules in year A, particularly SLANG102: Management of Communication Disorders 1: Language and Cognition (Developmental), SLANG103: Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech and Hearing and SLANG202: Management of Communication Disorders 3 Language and Cognition (Acquired) in year B. This module is relevant to the Health and Care Professions Council ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists relating to knowledge and understanding of psychology and linguistics, and the skills required for the application of this knowledge in clinical practice.
PLIN7309Linguistics of Sign LanguageUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces students to the linguistic study of signed languages, including sign language phonology, morphology, syntax and sociolinguistic variation. The module will begin by introducing the notion of language modality and why it is important for linguists to study signed languages. The bulk of the module will focus within the core areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, lexicon, syntax, semantics/pragmatics, and discourse. Other areas covered will include language modality and sociolinguistic variation and language contact. The module will end by considering the implications of sign languages for language universals.
PHOL3902Literature Project in PhysiologyUG1Division of BiosciencesA literature-based project allowing final year BSc students to research, utilizing library resources, on a physiological topic offered by a member of staff in the Division of Biosciences or associated departments.
BIOL3004Literature ReviewUG1Division of BiosciencesThe course provides the opportunity to undertake an individual review of published literature on a specified topic under supervision. You will develop skills in searching literature databases, reading and critically evaluating published work and presenting it in a scientific report.
PLIN3401Long Essay/ProjectUG1Division of Psychology and Language SciencesArticle-length essay or project report on a linguistic topic.
PSYCGR98Main ProjectPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGT11Major Schools of PsychoanalysisPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module traces the development of psychoanalysis in France and Britain since Freud's death. It provides coverage of the work of Melanie Klein and Wilfred Bion, Anna Freud, DW Winnicott, and Jacques Lacan.
PHAY1004Making Safe and Effective MedicinesUG1School of PharmacyThe aim of the module is to provide a basis for the understanding of the formulation and manufacture of safe and effective medicines, both sterile and non-sterile, with particular emphasis on liquid and semi-solid systems. The module will incorporate appreciation of the routes available for the administration of a drug to a patient, the physico-chemical aspects of formulations and dosage forms, and the considerations pertinent to manufacture in practice. Students will be introduced to the practical aspects of producing liquid and semi-solid pharmaceutical formulations and will demonstrate competency in the safe and professional preparation of such dosage forms. The special considerations pertaining to the preparation of sterile pharmaceutical producs will be discussed. Students will be introduced to radiopharmacy.
PHOL1001Mammalian PhysiologyUG1Division of BiosciencesThe subject is covered broadly in a set of 43 lectures. The introductory lectures on cell physiology deal with the movement of solute across cell membranes, membrane and action potentials and the special properties of excitable tissues. The principle organ systems are then covered conventionally: circulation, respiration, the gastro-intestinal tract, the nervous system, endocrines and the kidney. A set of practicals and self-instructional sessions with practical elements running on most Thursday afternoons.
PHOL1002Mammalian PhysiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesA half course unit introductory module in systems Physiology.
PHAYG106Management and LeadershipPG20School of Pharmacy
HCSCGS22Management of Acquired Communication DifficultiesPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis Module introduces students to acquired communication difficulties in both adults and children, and develops the theoretical and therapeutic frameworks underlying the principles of assessing and managing people with these problems. The Module has links with all the other Modules of the degree, but is linked most closely with HCSCGS21 (Professional & Clinical Studies II), HCSCGS23 (Disorder of Vocal Tract: Structure & Function), HCSCGS12 (Developmental Speech, Language & Communication Difficulties).
SLANG102Management of Communication Disorders 1: Language and Cognition (Developmental)PG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module covers the range of developmental language and communication impairments and their consequences; methods of speech and language therapy assessment and intervention; and models of delivery of speech and language therapy, particularly the importance of working with others. Alongside theoretical background and current research, practical and clinical aspects are considered and there are particularly close links with SLANG101 (Professional and Clinical Studies), SLANG105 (Linguistic and Psychological Perspectives on Development) and SLANG103 (Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech and Hearing). This module also links with a number of Year B modules including SLANG202: Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (acquired) and SLANG203: MCD 4: Speech, Swallowing and Voice. This module is relevant to the Health and Care Professions Council ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists relating to the management of clients with developmental language and communication impairments.
SLANG103Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech and HearingPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses knowledge and skills relating to: 1. the scientific bases of speech perception and production, hearing, and audiology and 2. the speech and language therapy management of children with developmental impairments of speech production and children with hearing impairment. The module links closely with all other Year A modules and with modules SLANG202: Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (Acquired) and SLANG204: Brain, Mind and Health in Year B of the programme.
SLANG202Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (Acquired)PG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses knowledge and skills relating to acquired language and cognitive communication disorders in both adults and children. It develops students’ understanding of the theoretical and therapeutic principles and processes of assessing, providing therapy and managing people with these disorders. Practical and clinical aspects are considered, including the importance of client-centred working and working with others. The module builds upon knowledge and skills developed in the first year of the MSc SLS, and its content is designed to be integrated with knowledge and skills developed throughout the second year, notably SLANG201: Professional Studies 2, SLANG203: Management of Communication Disorders 4 (Speech, Swallowing & Voice) and SLANG204: Brain, Mind & Health. This module is relevant to the Health and Care Professions Council ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists relating to the management of clients with acquired language and communication impairments.
SLANG203Management of Communication Disorders 4: Speech, Swallowing and VoicePG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses applied knowledge in the description, assessment, treatment and management of disorders of motor speech, swallowing and voice. Delivered in year B, the module spans terms 1 and 2. The module begins with an introduction to the three core topics: motor speech, swallowing and voice. Foundation knowledge relating to anatomy/physiology and neurology is also provided. Learning topics in term 1 include the aetiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management of neuromuscular and structural speech and swallowing disorders across the lifespan. Term 2 focuses on voice, structural abnormalities and complex case management. Face-to-face learning takes place through lectures and workshops. Learning for each lecture is supported by online resources and consolidation activities requiring the application of knowledge to clinical case scenarios. This module has links with a number of modules including: Brain and Behaviour, Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech & Hearing, Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (acquired), Phonetics & Phonology, and Professional Studies 1 & 2.
CELL3003Mechanisms of DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie animal development and cell differentiation, drawing on examples of a range of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics to be covered include maternal, gap and pair-rule genes, imaginal disks and signalling pathways, gastrulation, hindbrain and PNS patterning, limb development and regeneration, neural induction and aspects of development in the human adult.
CELL3005Mechanisms of DevelopmentUG1Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie animal development and cell differentiation, drawing on examples of a range of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics to be covered include maternal, gap and pair-rule genes, imaginal disks and signalling pathways, gastrulation, hindbrain and PNS patterning, limb development and regeneration, neural induction and aspects of development in the human adult.
CELLG003Mechanisms of DevelopmentPG15Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie animal development and cell differentiation, drawing on examples of a range of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics to be covered include maternal, gap and pair-rule genes, imaginal disks and signalling pathways, gastrulation, hindbrain and PNS patterning, limb development and regeneration, neural induction and aspects of development in the human adult.
CELLM003Mechanisms of Development (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie animal development and cell differentiation, drawing on examples of a range of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics to be covered include maternal, gap and pair-rule genes, imaginal disks and signalling pathways, gastrulation, hindbrain and PNS patterning, limb development and regeneration, neural induction and aspects of development in the human adult.
CELLM005Mechanisms of Development (Masters Level)UG1Division of BiosciencesThis module will consider the cellular and molecular events which underlie animal development and cell differentiation, drawing on examples of a range of vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics to be covered include maternal, gap and pair-rule genes, imaginal disks and signalling pathways, gastrulation, hindbrain and PNS patterning, limb development and regeneration, neural induction and aspects of development in the human adult.
CELL3003AMechanisms of Development AUG.5Division of Biosciences
CELL3005AMechanisms of Development AUG1Division of Biosciences
BIOC3006Mechanisms of Molecular Machines IUG.5Division of BiosciencesNew! This course has undergone a radical restructuring and now encompasses some of the most recent scientific discoveries and technical innovations. Twelve SMB lecturers teach their own research highlights on this course and in addition we have recruited four leading experts (from Birkbeck College, the National Institute for Medical Research and UCL Chemistry) to give guest seminars. Biochemistry 3003 takes the student on a journey that follows the flow of information in the cell, starting with nucleic acid synthesis and its regulation (replication, transcription, DNA repair and recombination, regulation by small noncoding RNAs), continuing with protein synthesis (translation) and ending with protein folding (chaperoning). The course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of protein structure and function. A number of structural, biochemical and biophysical methods are embedded in the course allowing the students to familiarise themselves with technologies including protein crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron microscopy (EM), F�rster resonance energy transfer (FRET), isothermal calorimetry (ITC), UV photo cross linking and cleavage.
BIOCG006Mechanisms of Molecular Machines IPG15Division of BiosciencesNew! This course has undergone a radical restructuring and now encompasses some of the most recent scientific discoveries and technical innovations. Twelve SMB lecturers teach their own research highlights on this course and in addition we have recruited four leading experts (from Birkbeck College, the National Institute for Medical Research and UCL Chemistry) to give guest seminars. Biochemistry 3003 takes the student on a journey that follows the flow of information in the cell, starting with nucleic acid synthesis and its regulation (replication, transcription, DNA repair and recombination, regulation by small noncoding RNAs), continuing with protein synthesis (translation) and ending with protein folding (chaperoning). The course aims to provide an in-depth understanding of protein structure and function. A number of structural, biochemical and biophysical methods are embedded in the course allowing the students to familiarise themselves with technologies including protein crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron microscopy (EM), F�rster resonance energy transfer (FRET), isothermal calorimetry (ITC), UV photo cross linking and cleavage.
BIOC3006AMechanisms of Molecular Machines I AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHAYG019Medicinal Natural ProductsPG30School of Pharmacy
PHAY2002Medicines from the Bench to the ClinicUG1School of Pharmacy
PHAY2900Medicines Management for Pharmacy TechniciansUG1.5School of Pharmacy
PALS1003MemoryUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module provides an introduction to key concepts and debates in memory research, including conceptualisations of short and long term memory, models of working memory, and processes involved in the encoding, storage and retrieval of memories. While the main focus is on normal memory processes, there is also some coverage of memory disorders.
PALS1003AMemory AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is a version suitable for Term 1 only affiliate students.
PSYC1201Memory and DecisionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course aims to provide honours-level coverage of a core area of psychology, building on the introductory overview provided by 1107, and giving the background for students to undertake specialist third year options in this area. Specifically it aims to introduce normative and descriptive theories of various different types of decision making, and to enable students to understand basic processes of memory encoding, organisation and retrieval. The inter-dependence between decision making and memory will be highlighted by covering memory-based processes in decision-making (e.g. direct retrieval of previously effective decision strategies, the availability heuristic) and decision processes in memory (e.g. confidence assessments). Specific topics include: Expected utility theory and its variants; decision analysis; heuristics and biases; ecological (Brunswikian) approaches to decision making; cooperative group decision making; game theory and its applications; risk-taking behaviour, fairness; trust. Definitions of memory; formation, consolidation and disruption of the memory trace; distinction between semantic and episodic memory; autobiographical memory; remembering in everyday life; feelings of knowing, metamemory and confidence in retrieval; individual differences in memory and the study of mnemonics and mnemonists; memory in a social context; case studies of effects of brain damage (e.g. amnesia).
NEUR3003Metabolic NeuroscienceUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe lectures in this module cover metabolic neuroscience research at an advanced level. They provide a thorough understanding of the physiology of metabolic regulation based on current ongoing research in this area. The lectures cover metabolic disease and discuss current and novel treatment strategies. Finally, emphasis is placed on the key technical approaches applied in metabolic neuroscience and their critical evaluation, as addressed in the journal club. The in-course assessment and associated guidance is aimed at honing both verbal and written presentation skills within the subject area. The content of the course is delivered through 22 lectures given by research-active experts in the respective areas. This will be supplemented by a series of Journal clubs and Seminars where each student will be taking the lead in turn. These presentations will form part of the in course assessment together with the preparation of a 'News and Views' style review article selected from a variety of topics.
NEURM003Metabolic Neuroscience (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOC2005Metabolism and Its RegulationUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe aims of this course are to provide an understanding of metabolic processes in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The course will cover areas such as strategies for cellular regulation, fed and fasting state metabolism, exercise metabolism, fat metabolism, electron transport and ATP synthesis, photosynthesis, copper/iron/zinc homoestasis in health and disease, prokaryotic metabolism of inorganic compounds (such as iron, sulphur and arsenic) and how they are controlled.
PSYCGC15Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience I: Lesion ApproachesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module teaches students how lesion approaches can be used to advance the field of cognitive neuroscience. A series of case demonstrations will be given, each of a patient with a circumscribed brain lesion and associated functional deficit. Theoretical issues surrounding neuropsychological data, and how to use magnetic resonance imaging to characterize structural and functional aspects of brain lesions, will be discussed. The module also considers 'virtual lesions', brought about by transcranial magnetic and direct current stimulation. Practical, theoretical, and methodological aspects of this technique will be explored. Lesion techniques in humans will be discussed alongside work using animal models.
PSYCGC11Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience II: NeuroimagingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module focuses on modern techniques for imaging the human brain. Students will be taught the key principles of a range of neuroimaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG). The methodological limitations of these techniques will be discussed and there may be an opportunity to observe the techniques in action. The module explores how each technique can be used to understand mind-brain relations in patients and healthy individuals, emphasizing their relative advantages and disadvantages. Students will learn about the analysis and interpretation of neuroimaging data, and how to disseminate findings.
BIOL1008Methods in Ecology and EvolutionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will introduce students to the scope, basic concepts and methods of ecology/evolution. It will show them how the two disciplines intersect in terms of research questions and methodologies. Selected topics (e.g. speciation, molecular evolution and biological invasions) each drawn from current research in the department of GEE will then be discussed in more detail. Students will use statistical methods covered in BIOL1002 “Quantitative Biology” to explore and analyse ecological and evolutionary datasets related to each topic. They will learn how to implement and modify the appropriate packages in R for performing their analyses and be introduced to GIS and bioinformatics.
CELL3007Mitochondrial Biology, Bioenergetics and Metabolism in Human DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will establish firm foundations for understanding core processes and pathways that dictate cellular energy balance, and explore their roles in health and in disease. It should provide solid foundations for progression into post graduate research either in Academia or Industry. The course will provide a basis for understanding essential aspects of mitochondrial bioenergetics and cell biology, including quality control pathways of autophagy, biogenesis, fission, fusion and trafficking. We will explore pathways of cell death in detail. The taught course will include a technical component to ensure that students understand how measurements are made and interpreted, including opportunities for hands on demonstrations of major technical approaches in metabolic studies.
PHAYG057Modern Aspect of Drug DiscoveryPG30School of Pharmacy
ANAT3040Molecular Basis of Neuropsychiatric DisordersUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module is designed to provide students with a conceptual and detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of neuropsychiatric disease. Topics covered will inculde: depression, mania and anxiety, Alzheimer's and frontotemporal lobe dementias (FTLD), schizophrenia and psychosis, addiction reward and anhedonia, as well as autistic spectrum disorder and Rett syndrome. These subjects will be introduced through reference to contemporary research into the areas.
BIOC2001Molecular BiologyUG1Division of BiosciencesAn integrated course in molecular biology that includes lectures, tutorials, online DNA analysis exercises and an experimental research project, which introduces students to DNA cloning and DNA analyses. Research results are written-up in the format of a scientific paper. In addition to the lecture content, emphasis is placed on numerical skills and data analyses. The module begins with lectures on nucleic acids, their structure and properties and how these are used in research techniques. Plasmids and bacteriophage lambda, whose DNA will be manipulated in the laboratory research project, are covered. Lectures also include bacterial transformation and conjugation. A series of lectures on ‘understanding the human genome’ describe technology e.g. dideoxy and new generation sequencing technologies and features of the genome e.g. genes and gene families, pseudogenes, LINES and SINES and an introduction to bioinformatic tools and databases. Other topics discussed are DNA replication, including the telomerase machinery used to prevent chromosome shortening in eukaryotic organisms. DNA proof-reading and repair mechanisms used during and post-replication are discussed. Protein synthesis and how proteins are targeted to their correct cellular location are covered in five lectures. Building on the biological knowledge and experimental expertise students gain as they progress through the module, lectures are included on how DNA cloning enables us to produce RNA and DNA probes e.g. in situ hybridization and microarray analyses, investigate protein targeting and how cloned DNA is used to express proteins and create mutant proteins. Gene regulation in prokaryotic organisms includes regulation of the lac, trp, lux and ribosomal RNA operons and two-component systems. Eukaryotic molecular biology lectures discuss the contribution of lower eukaryotes; chromosomes; gene control in development, levels of control and gene regulation in higher organisms including hormone regulation of gene expression.
BIOC2001AMolecular Biology AUG1Division of Biosciences
NEUR2001Molecular Biology for NeuroscientistsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis 0.5 CU module with a substantial practical component is mandatory for Year 2 students on the BSc and MSci Neuroscience degree programmes and is not available to other students. You will work for five days in consecutive week in the laboratory on a set of interconnected experiments (research project). These practical sessions are accompanied by lectures and workshops.
BIOCM101Molecular Biosciences (Biochemistry) MSci Extended Research Project (Masters Level)UG3Division of BiosciencesAn extended research project designed for Year 4 MSci Biochemistry students in the Faculty of Life Sciences. A range of project titles will be offered by SMB staff in areas that complement the taught material in the Molecular Biosciences degree programmes. Under supervision, students will carry out original experimental and/or modeling/and/or bioinformatic/analysis work, give a conference presentation on it and write it up in the form of a scientific paper.
BIOC3024Molecular Mechanisms of Gene Expression and RegulationUG.5Division of Biosciences
BIOCG024Molecular Mechanisms of Gene Expression and RegulationPG15Division of BiosciencesGene expression in bacteria: integrated control networks, two component signal transduction systems. Transcriptional regulation in higher organisms and molecular techniques for studying gene function: the pre-inititaion complex, signals that activate transcription factors, DNA cloning and complementation teachniques for identifying DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions; chromtin structure and gene expression; studying gene regulation and function in vivo. Post transcriptional and translational control of gene expression: RNA splicing, RNA editing and mRNA stbaility; examples of alternative splicing. Protein synthesis - mechanisms and regulation of translation.
PHAR3003Molecular PharmacologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course deals with the quantitative principles that underlie the study of the action of drugs at receptors beginning with the physical chemical principles which underlie drug-receptor interactions. The molecular nature of receptors is considered in detail and a critcal and quantitative approach to the analysis and interpretation of pharmacological data is developed. This course provides core information for B.Sc. Pharmacology and M.Sci. Medical Chemistry students and supplements existing course unit options for final year students in related degree programmes in the Faculty of Life Sciences.
PHARG003Molecular PharmacologyPG15Division of BiosciencesThe course deals with the quantitative principles that underlie the study of the action of drugs at receptors beginning with the physical chemical principles which underlie drug-receptor interactions. The molecular nature of receptors is considered in detail and a critcal and quantitative approach to the analysis and interpretation of pharmacological data is developed. This course provides core information for B.Sc. Pharmacology and M.Sci. Medical Chemistry students and supplements existing course unit options for final year students in related degree programmes in the Faculty of Life Sciences.
PHARM003Molecular Pharmacology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course deals with the quantitative principles that underlie the study of the action of drugs at receptors beginning with the physical chemical principles which underlie drug-receptor interactions. The molecular nature of receptors is considered in detail and a critcal and quantitative approach to the analysis and interpretation of pharmacological data is developed.
PHAR3003AMolecular Pharmacology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PLIN7312MorphologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe goal of morphology is to understand the constraints on well-formedness in words: what makes a possible word and how do affixes and roots combine, given constraints from the syntax, semantics, phonology, and the morphology proper. In this course we will first discuss the essential background information and then critically discuss case studies from a range of typologically diverse languages illustrating both inflection and derivation.
PLING158MorphologyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe goal of morphology is to understand the constraints on well-formedness in words: what makes a possible word and how do affixes and roots combine, given constraints from the syntax, semantics, phonology, and the morphology proper. In this course we will first discuss the essential background information and then critically discuss case studies from a range of typologically diverse languages illustrating both inflection and derivation.
BIOSG098MRes Biosciences Research ProjectPG120Division of BiosciencesNot applicable
BIOSG003MRes Biosciences Research SeminarsPG15Division of BiosciencesIn order to acquire the skills to carry out research it is necessary to gain in depth theoretical knowledge and practical experience in a specialised topic. However, it is also important to gain an appreciation of the different fields within the biosciences and how crossing disciplines can provide further insight and illustrate the potential for collaborative or multidisciplinary research. An important aspect of successful collaboration is to be able to cross scientific boundaries by reviewing the literature and communicating a specialist topic in simple but accurate terms that can be understood by non-experts in the field. Assessment will be 100% coursework consisting of two assignments.
BIOSG002MRes Biosciences Research SkillsPG15Division of BiosciencesIn addition to academic learning and the acquisition of practical skills within the laboratory, training in scientific research requires a range of skills for data and reference management and the verbal, written and visual communication of science.
GENEG099MSc Genetics of Human Disease : Research ProjectPG90Division of Biosciences
PSYCGI98MSc HCI-E ProjectPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesEach MSc student undertakes a practical project under the general supervision of University staff. The subject is decided after consultation between the Teaching Director, the supervisor(s) and the student. The write-up of the project is in the form of a dissertation and counts as an important part of the MSc assessment. Projects may be based in UCLIC, any University Department, a research laboratory, or externally in industry. The problem investigated can be research or applications orientated. The presentation of the project is always in the form of an academic dissertation (about 12000 words), whether the investigation is laboratory-orientated or applications-orientated. The student is expected to bring in a good balance of the subjects covered by the course, taking an interdisciplinary approach to the problem and backing the practical side of the project with a full relevant literature review. A few students may be supervised by academics in other departments, most commonly Computer Science.
ANATG007MSc Neuroscience: Journal ClubPG30Division of BiosciencesThe module aims to help students to read and understand research papers effectively and critically. Introductory lectures will be provided that cover the basic areas of the field to be discussed during the journal club. All students will be provided with either one or two journal papers a week in advance of the journal club, and each week two students will give an introductory presentation on the paper(s). The papers will be either relevant to the topic which is being taught that week, or will be very recent papers covering the most recent advances in neuroscience research.
ANATG099MSc Neuroscience: Research ProjectPG90Division of BiosciencesA laboratory research project conducted in a Neuroscience laboratory of the students choosing within UCL (there are over 400 different research groups operating at UCL in the broad field of Neuroscience). UCL's research strength in Neuroscience is the best in Europe and arguably number 2 in the world. The students are expected to work for two days per week in the laboratory until the end of March and then full time in the laboratory for the remainder of the course. A written dissertation in the form of a research article that could be submitted to the Journal of Neuroscience with an additional 1000 word critique of the methods employed in the project and a viva voce examination form the assessment of the module. It is of vital importance that this assessment method is employed for two reasons. First, the MSc Neuroscience is an intensive, research led taught masters programme with research methodology, critical understanding and knowledge of cutting edge research forming the reason d'etre of the entire programme. The assessment in the form of the students preparing a research paper that could be submitted to a prestigious journal gives the students a vital experience of how to present data for peer review in clear and concise terms. Second, the research project is a lengthy one and requires a considerable amount of effort on the part of prospective supervisors who agree to take a student on for a whole calendar year and to provide the necessary research reagents and consumables for that student. The resulting generation of a dissertation that is already formatted and presented in the form of a journal article is a valuable way of the course attracting more prospective supervisors to take on MSc Neuroscience students.
GENEG098MSc Pharmacogenetics and Stratified Medicine: Research ProjectPG60Division of Biosciences
PSYCGN99MSc Psychodynamic Developmental Neuroscience: Research ThesisPG100Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents undertake a piece of independent research under the supervision of a research mentor at Yale with additional input from a UCL affiliated 2nd supervisor. During the first year in London students are paired with an individual academic research supervisor in Yale. Students arrive in Yale by September of the second year. In the Fall all students must present their proposal (orally and in written form) to a group of Yale and UCL academics to garner feedback and make any necessary amendments. During the rest of the year each student must complete their research project. The final dissertation should contain a comprehensive literature review mindful of psychoanalytic perspectives.
PSYCGS99MSc Social Cognition: DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGT98MSc Theoretical Psychoanalytic Studies: DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOLM030MSci Extended Research Project (Masters Level)UG3Division of BiosciencesThe course provides the opportunity to undertake an individual research project of 18 weeks duration. Projects can be based on experimental research, field work, theoretical or data analysis. You will develop skills in designing experiments, framing questions, and, where relevant, planning the details and implementing the practical work. You will also receive guidance on assessing results and on presenting the project in both written and verbal form. You will also be expected to read relevant literature.
NEURM030MSci Extended Research Project in NeuroscienceUG3Division of Biosciences
PHARM030MSci Extended Research Project in PharmacologyUG3Division of Biosciences
CELLM101MSci in Cell Biology - Extended Research Project (Masters Level)UG3Division of BiosciencesThe module is an extended research project for fourth year MSci students with a background in Cell Biology. This module has two streams – a Developmental and a Molecular Cell Biology stream (Stream Tutors, Leslie Dale and Julie Pitcher respectively). Research projects will be offered by CDB and LMCB. The projects offered will be collaborative – meaning the students have two supervisors for this important element of the MSci. Under supervision the students carry our original research that is assessed via a short progress report, at a lab meeting, a conference presentation and a write-up in the form of a scientific paper.
BIOLM005MSci Research Project in Biological Sciences (Masters Level)UG2Division of BiosciencesThe course provides the opportunity to undertake an individual research project of 9 weeks duration (including writing the assessed report) under supervision. Projects can be based on experimental research, field work, theoretical or data analysis. You will develop skills in designing experiments, framing questions, and, where relevant, planning the details and implementing the practical work. You will also receive guidance on assessing results and on presenting the project in both written and verbal form. You will also be expected to read relevant literature.
BIOSM901MSci Research Project in Life Sciences (Masters Level)UG2Division of BiosciencesA research project designed for those final year MSci students on the Natural Sciences programme whose major stream is in the Faculty of Life Sciences. A range of project titles will be offered within the Faculty to complement the taught material in such streams. Under supervision, students will carry out original experimental and/or modeling work. They will then write a dissertation critically analysing and presenting their results. Students will also be expected to defend an oral presentation of their work.
NEURM901MSci Research Project in Life Sciences (Masters Level)UG2Division of Biosciences
PHARM901MSci Research Project in Life Sciences (Masters Level)UG2Division of Biosciences
PSYCGN51Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology 1PG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN52Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology 2PG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAYG067NanomedicinesPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYG026Natural Product DiscoveryPG30School of Pharmacy
NEUR3018Neural Basis of Motivation and LearningUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module is centred around the group of neural structures traditionally described as the limbic system which are involved in learning, memory, emotion, motivation and navigation. They include the amygdala, septum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. The course consists of a set of lectures on the anatomy, physiology and role in behaviour of these structures, as well as the molecular, cellular and genetic basis for their involvement in these behaviours. In addition tutorials will be given on specific topics raised in the lectures.
NEURG018Neural Basis of Motivation and LearningPG15Division of Biosciences The module is centred around the group of neural structures traditionally described as the limbic system which are involved in learning, memory, emotion, motivation and navigation. They include the amygdala, septum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. The course consists of a set of lectures on the anatomy, physiology and role in behaviour of these structures, as well as the molecular, cellular and genetic basis for their involvement in these behaviours.
NEURM018Neural Basis of Motivation and Learning (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences The module is centred around the group of neural structures traditionally described as the limbic system which are involved in learning, memory, emotion, motivation and navigation. They include the amygdala, septum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. The course consists of a set of lectures on the anatomy, physiology and role in behaviour of these structures, as well as the molecular, cellular and genetic basis for their involvement in these behaviours.
NEUR3018ANeural Basis of Motivation and Learning AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PALS1007Neural Basis of Perception, Memory and LanguageUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThrough this module, students will gain a basic understanding of the human nervous system and its interaction with sensory organs of hearing and vision. The basic anatomy of ear and eye will be presented in addition to basic neuroanatomy, with particular reference to the neural basis of memory (linking with PALS 1003) and language. Students will also be introduced to the neural basis of acquired language impairments.
NEUR3041Neural Computation: Models of Brain FunctionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module examines how behaviour results from the properties of neurons and synapses in the brain. Some simple computational models of how networks of neurons can be used to perform useful functions are introduced and applied to help understand several examples of the neural bases of behaviour in humans and animals. Topics covered will include the role of synaptic plasticity in learning and memory, the coding of information by the firing rate and time of firing of neurons, the neural bases of memory, coordination of action, audition, olfaction,and conscious awareness. Neural systems studies will include the motor, parietal and frontal cortices, the hippocampus, cerebellum and the spinal cord.
NEURG041Neural Computation: Models of Brain FunctionPG15Division of BiosciencesThis module examines how behaviour results from the properties of neurons and synapses in the brain. Some simple computational models of how networks of neurons can be used to perform useful functions are introduced and applied to help understand several examples of the neural bases of behaviour in humans and animals. Topics covered will include the role of synaptic plasticity in learning and memory, the coding of information by the firing rate and time of firing of neurons, the neural bases of memory, coordination of action, audition, olfaction,and conscious awareness. Neural systems studies will include the motor, parietal and frontal cortices, the hippocampus, cerebellum and the spine.
NEURM041Neural Computation: Models of Brain Function (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences1. To introduce the consideration of neurons and synapses in terms of their computational properties and interpretation of their action in terms of information processing. 2. To introduce the analysis of an animal's ability to learn, remember or act in terms of the action of neurons and synapses within the animal's nervous system. 3. To understand several examples of how the action of individual neurons and synapses in various parts of the central nervous system contribute to the learning, memory or behaviour of an organism.
NEUR3041ANeural Computation: Models of Brain Function AUG.5Division of Biosciences
ANATG006Neurobiology of Degeneration and RepairPG15Division of BiosciencesThe module will cover damage, regeneration and repair, pathology of the nervous system and neurological disease (including sodium channels and epilepsy, mitochondria and neurodegenerative disease, brain and spinal cord injury: use of glial cells as reparative bridges, and use of stem cells in animal models of CNS disorders); genetics and mechanisms involved in mood disorders such as schizophrenia.
ANAT3029Neurobiology of Neurodegenerative Diseases (Extended)UG1Division of BiosciencesThe last few years have seen a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basic biological mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of mutations in a variety of genes, found to encode proteins present in neuro-pathological inclusions, has suggested that a common feature of all these diseases might be the intracellular accumulation of fibrous protein aggregates within neurons, resulting in neuronal cell death. This course will discuss this novel hypothesis in the light of contemporary research, and provide a foundation for our current understanding of neurodegenerative diseases. The 0.5 CU version of the module (ANAT3028) consists of the lecture series and is examined by one three-hour exam, whereas this 1.0 CU version (ANAT3029) comprises the same lectures and exam, but additionally requires submission of a 6,000 word dissertation (to be submitted in the January).
ANATM029Neurobiology of Neurodegenerative Diseases (Extended) (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciences
PLIN7311NeurolinguisticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the neuroscience of language and its implication for linguistics. The ultimate goal of neuroscience of language is to understand how language is represented in the brain, this presupposes some understanding of the nature of language representations, of how those representations are processed and the functioning of the brain.
PLING157NeurolinguisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the neuroscience of language and its implication for linguistics. The ultimate goal of neuroscience of language is to understand how language is represented in the brain, this presupposes some understanding of the nature of language representations, of how those representations are processed and the functioning of the brain.
PLIN7311ANeurolinguistics AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAR3001NeuropharmacologyUG1Division of BiosciencesIn recent years many developments, such as the use of levo dopa in Parkinsonism, the manipulation of excitation in epilepsy and the discovery of endogenous opioids, have brought basic neuropharmacology and the successful treatment of disorders of the C.N.S. much closer together. It is likely that future prospects for drug therapy in neurology and psychiatry will depend very much on a better understanding of neurotransmitter function and manipulation. This neuropharmacology course tries to provide a basis for such an understanding. The evidence for different transmitters (from morphological, electrophysiological, pharmacological and biochemical studies) is evaluated so as to build up a picture of their pre- and post-synaptic actions and their interactions in specific pathways and brain areas. This knowledge is then applied to a consideration of various disease states and drug action. Special emphasis is given to neurotransmitter function and malfunction in epilepsy, Parkinsonism, memory, cell death and pain states and to the mode of action of drugs in these conditions. Students attend a comprehensive series of lectures given by experts in the field. The evaluation of published work and a proper appreciation of the problems facing research workers is helped by practical experience of the methods used. Accordingly students taking the whole unit (C3) will perform individual or group projects on the release and electrophysiological and behaviourial effects of neurotransmitters and their modification by drugs.
PHAR3002NeuropharmacologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course consists of lectures and discussions offered in the full unit PHAR3001 course. No practical work.
PHAR3002ANeuropharmacologyUG.5Division of Biosciences
PHARG002NeuropharmacologyPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course consists of lectures and discussions offered in the full unit (C3) course. No practical work.
PHARM001Neuropharmacology (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciencesn recent years many developments, such as the use of levo dopa in Parkinsonism, the manipulation of excitation in epilepsy and the discovery of endogenous opioids, have brought basic neuropharmacology and the successful treatment of disorders of the C.N.S. much closer together. It is likely that future prospects for drug therapy in neurology and psychiatry will depend very much on a better understanding of neurotransmitter function and manipulation. This neuropharmacology course tries to provide a basis for such an understanding. The evidence for different transmitters (from morphological, electrophysiological, pharmacological and biochemical studies) is evaluated so as to build up a picture of their pre- and post-synaptic actions and their interactions in specific pathways and brain areas. This knowledge is then applied to a consideration of various disease states and drug action. Special emphasis is given to neurotransmitter function and malfunction in epilepsy, Parkinsonism, memory, cell death and pain states and to the mode of action of drugs in these conditions. Students attend a comprehensive series of lectures given by experts in the field. The evaluation of published work and a proper appreciation of the problems facing research workers is helped by practical experience of the methods used. Accordingly students taking the whole unit (C3) will perform individual or group projects on the release and electrophysiological and behaviourial effects of neurotransmitters and their modification by drugs.
PHARM002Neuropharmacology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course consists of lectures and discussions offered in the full unit (C3) course. No practical work.
PHAR3001ANeuropharmacology AUG1Division of Biosciences
PALSG103Neuroscience of LanguagePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesModule overview: The objective of the module is to familiarize students with the work of neuroscientists whose research focuses on speech and language; familiarize them with these state of the art research methods and their applications; and help them to critically read the relevant literature. It is expected that by the end of the module students will know the possibilities and limitations of using imaging technology in studying language processing both in normal and patient populations; will know the questions contemporary neuroscientists are interested in; will be confident readers of research papers. The module will be taught by UCL lecturers who are active researchers in the area of neuroscience of language. Each week a different lecturer will present his/her own research. Students will be asked to read an original paper for each session and be able to discuss it in class.
PHAYG023New Drug Targets in the CNSPG15School of Pharmacy
PSYCGN45Observation 1: Parent InfantPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module focuses upon the infant's development in the early months of life and how the relationship with the primary caregiver becomes established and consolidated. The vicissitudes of this relationship are examined through the linking of direct observations to the appropriate theoretical perspectives. Through this repeated task, the students are encouraged to develop the skills of integration between theory and observation.
PSYCGP28Observation I: Parent InfantPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module focuses upon the infants development in the early months of life and how the relationship with the primary caregiver becomes established and consolidated. The vicissitudes of this relationship are examined through the linking of direct observations to the appropriate theoretical perspectives.
PSYCGP29Observation II: Toddler ObservationPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents observe a fortnightly toddler group for an hour and a half which is held at the Anna Freud Centre and attend weekly one hour seminars to present and discuss these observations. This module focuses upon the toddlers development towards separation and individuation from the primary care giver as the child's motor and cognitive capacities increase.
PSYCGP30Observation III: Observation of a Nursery-school aged ChildPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents observe weekly for one hour in local nursery schools and attend weekly one hour seminars to present and discuss these observations. This module focuses upon the expansion and development of the young child's social relating as observed in a nursery setting.
PSYC9001AOne-Term Psychology Research Project AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents are required to produce an empirical, experimental piece of work on a psychological topic. Students will be responsible for conducting research under the supervision of a member of faculty. Students will usually meet with their supervisor to discuss the project at least once per week. This research project should culminate in a written report akin to a manuscript prepared for submission to a psychological journal (2500-3500 words). Please note that students can only take this module if they are able to find a member of faculty to supervise them.
PSYC9001BOne-Term Psychology Research Project BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents are required to produce an empirical, experimental piece of work on a psychological topic. Students will be responsible for conducting research under the supervision of a member of faculty. Students will usually meet with their supervisor to discuss the project at least once per week. This research project should culminate in a written report akin to a manuscript prepared for submission to a psychological journal (2500-3500 words). Please note that students can only take this module if they are able to find a member of faculty to supervise them.
PHAY3104OptionsUG1School of Pharmacy
PSYC3108Organisational PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will cover in some detail theories and research on issues currently topical in Organisational Psychology from job motivation, leadership and stress to the future of work.
PSYCG108Organisational PsychologyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3108 on the module database
PSYC3108AOrganisational Psychology AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3108
ANAT3042PainUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module aims to present an integrated approach to pain. Through a series of ten two-hour lectures students will be presented with information about the basic mechanisms of pain and its clinical manifestations. Students will also be introduced to current ideas about therapy and management and to the problems inherent in measurements of pain. A series of seminars based on reading topics will be held at the end of the course.
ANATM042Pain (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module aims to present an integrated approach to pain. Through a series of 18 lectures students will be presented with information about the basic mechanisms of pain and its clinical manifestations. Students will also be introduced to current ideas about therapy and management and to the problems inherent in measurements of pain. A series of seminars based on reading topics will be held at the end of the course.
PSYCGN61Parent Training for Conduct ProblemsPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYC2212PerceptionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course aims to provide a basic understanding of core theoretical issues and experimental findings in the study of perception, particularly focusing on visual perception, auditory perception and the effects of attention on visual and auditory perception.
PSYC2212APerception AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC2212
PALS1002Perception, Attention and LearningUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an introduction to topics in visual (and auditory) attention, auditory perception and learning intended to provide a background in knowledge of these areas through a series of lectures, supporting tutorials and practical sessions. We provide a brief historical background as well as a modern perspective, discussing early cognitive theories, recent theoretical accounts and how neuroimaging has advanced our knowledge of the brain mechanisms involved in perception, attention, and learning. The course also covers some disorders of perception and attention, and highlights the links with language through lectures on speech perception and attention. There are ten one hour lectures, three supporting tutorials involving discussion and practical demonstrations.
PLIN3605Performance Documentation AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN3606Performance Documentation BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAYG064Personalised MedicinePG15School of Pharmacy
PALS3001Perspectives on Clinical PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesPsychological disorders are common and very diverse across the lifespan. In this module, the most common disorders in childhood and adulthood will be discussed. The main theoretical models applied to psychopathology (biological, cognitive-behavioural, psychodynamic and systemic) will be critically examined, and the efficacy of recommended treatments on offer will be reviewed. The significance of experimental psychopathology to good clinical psychology research will be emphasised, and the common issues clinical psychological research encounters will be analysed. Controversies and issues, such as stigma, diagnosis, cultural issues, will be discussed throughout the module.
PSYCGI19Persuasive GamesPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHAYG033Pharma ManagementPG30School of Pharmacy
PHAYG065Pharmaceutical BiotechnologyPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYG028Pharmacogenomics, Adverse Drug Reactions and BiomarkersPG15School of PharmacyThis module will provide a background to the importance of biomarker identification and the methods used to discovery novel biomarkers. The module will also describe pharmacogenomics, drug metabolism and adverse drug reactions. The student will be familiarized with the importance of and continued quest for novel biomarkers of disease and toxicology and current up to date methods for identification of biomarkers. Students will gain an understanding of pharmacogenomics; single nucleotide polymorphisms, drug metabolism and adverse drug reactions. Students will gain experience in the critical analysis and presentation of data upon completion of the two coursework assignments
PHAR3005Pharmacology of InflammationUG1Division of BiosciencesAs our knowledge of human disease increases it is becoming evident that inflammation plays a significant part in many pathologies. The diseases in which inflammation has a major role, not only includes the classical inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, allergies and the auto-immune pathologies, but also atherosclerosis, ischemic-reperfusion injury, sepsis/multiply organ failure and COPD. Inflammation is also an important component of metabolic diseases, with evidence suggesting a link between diabetes obesity and inflammation, is an important of tumor genesis and is the underlying mechanism by which transplants are rejected. This course provides in-depth coverage of the core mechanism by which inflammation is initiated and maintained and discusses the state of the current and future research trends in its treatment.
PHAR3031Pharmacology of InflammationUG.5Division of BiosciencesAs our knowledge of human disease increases it is becoming evident that inflammation plays a significant part in many pathologies. The diseases in which inflammation has a major role, not only includes the classical inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, allergies and the auto-immune pathologies, but also atherosclerosis, ischemic-reperfusion injury, sepsis/multiply organ failure and COPD. Inflammation is also an important component of metabolic diseases, with evidence suggesting a link between diabetes obesity and inflammation, is an important of tumor genesis and is the underlying mechanism by which transplants are rejected. This course provides in-depth coverage of the core mechanism by which inflammation is initiated and maintained and discusses the state of the current and future research trends in its treatment.
PHARG031Pharmacology of InflammationPG15Division of BiosciencesAs our knowledge of human disease increases it is becoming evident that inflammation plays a significant part in many pathologies. The diseases in which inflammation has a major role, not only includes the classical inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, allergies and the auto-immune pathologies, but also atherosclerosis, ischemic-reperfusion injury, sepsis/multiply organ failure and COPD. Inflammation is also an important component of metabolic diseases, with evidence suggesting a link between diabetes obesity and inflammation, is an important of tumor genesis and is the underlying mechanism by which transplants are rejected. This course provides in-depth coverage of the core mechanism by which inflammation is initiated and maintained and discusses the state of the current and future research trends in its treatment.
PHARM005Pharmacology of Inflammation (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciences
PHARM031Pharmacology of Inflammation (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesAs our knowledge of human disease increases it is becoming evident that inflammation plays a significant part in many pathologies. The diseases in which inflammation has a major role, not only includes the classical inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, allergies and the auto-immune pathologies, but also atherosclerosis, ischemic-reperfusion injury, sepsis/multiply organ failure and COPD. Inflammation is also an important component of metabolic diseases, with evidence suggesting a link between diabetes obesity and inflammation, is an important of tumor genesis and is the underlying mechanism by which transplants are rejected. This course provides in-depth coverage of the core mechanism by which inflammation is initiated and maintained and discusses the state of the current and future research trends in its treatment.
PLIN3101Phonetic TheoryUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesTo develop an understanding of how communicative meanings are encoded through articulation in speech by taking a critical look at recent work in experimental phonetics and exploring a number of theoretical issues in phonetics and phonology.
PLING154Phonetic TheoryPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course will present a critical examination of how phonetics relates to other disciplines in linguistics by exploring a number of theoretical issues in phonetic science, with focus on how human speech can effectively transmit multiple layers of communicative meanings through an articulation process. It will cover issues relating to coarticulation, distinctive features, timing and coordination, speech acquisition and vocal expression of emotions, and demonstrate how they are mechanistically interrelated based on an articulatory-functional view of speech. Also will be discussed is research methodology in terms of its importance for the theoretical development in phonetic science.
PLING113Phonetics and PhonologyPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the study of the design properties of the sound systems of human language. Building on a basic knowledge of articulatory phonetics, this course looks at the acoustic properties and cognitive organisation of speech sounds, how and why they change in different contexts and how they are organised into prosodic constituents. Data are drawn from the widest possible range of languages. The focus is on how to construct arguments for the lexical representation of sounds and how to formalise phonological processes.
SLANG104Phonetics and PhonologyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module provides students with a basic knowledge of: • the practical and theoretical study of speech sounds (phonetics) • the study of articulatory phonetics (i.e. how speech sounds are produced) and the scientific bases of speech production • the systematic use of speech sounds in language (phonology) • the practical and theoretical study of variation in speech (e.g., accent variation, multilingualism) This module is relevant to the HCPC standards of proficiency for speech and language therapists relating to knowledge and understanding of phonetics and phonology, and the skills required for the application of this knowledge in clinical practice. The course links closely with all other Year A modules, in particular SLANG103: Management of Communication Disorders 2; Speech & Hearing.
PLING111Phonetics and Phonology IPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAn introduction to the study of the design properties of the sound systems of human language. Building on a basic knowledge of phonetics, this course looks at the cognitive organisation of speech sounds and at how and why they change in different contexts. Data are drawn from the widest possible range of languages. The focus is on how to construct arguments for the lexical representation of sounds and how to formalise phonological processes.
PLIN2101Phonology of EnglishUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesUnlike traditional dictionary-oriented descriptions, the course places English phonology within its wider typological context, especially with respect to the characteristics it shares with other languages. The focus is on present-day dialect differences and the historical changes that lie behind them. The phenomena to be explored centre around the interaction between segmental phonology on the one hand and prosodic and morphological structure on the other. Course participants will collect and analyse their own data.
PLING230Phonology of EnglishPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesUnlike traditional dictionary-oriented descriptions, the course places English phonology within its wider typological context, especially with respect to the characteristics it shares with other languages. The focus is on present-day dialect differences and the historical changes that lie behind them. The phenomena to be explored centre around the interaction between segmental phonology on the one hand and prosodic and morphological structure on the other.
PSYCGI16Physical Computing and PrototypingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module provides an introduction to advanced prototyping methods for designing physical user interfaces and devices. Students will learn techniques for extending computation beyond the on-screen graphical user interfaces into the physical world. Inspired by seminal work in ubiquitous computing, tangible user interfaces, and physical computing, students will learn (1) how to use digital fabrication methods to rapidly prototype physical designs; and (2) how to use electronics, sensor and actuator toolkits, and physical computing methods to make devices interactive and react to sensed properties. Topics covered in the module include the necessary background in physical computing, digital fabrication and electronics, and the process for selecting suitable prototyping methods to address challenges in interaction design.
PSYCRC11Placement 1UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC12Placement 2UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC13Placement 3UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC14Placement 4UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC15Placement 5UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC16Placement 6UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGE05Placement File (Part I)PG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGE06Placement File (Part II)PG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOL3002Plants, Environment and Climate ChangeUG.5Division of BiosciencesTopics include: plants and nitrogen availability; drought and plant production; compatible solutes; flooding tolerance; cold and freezing stress; heat stress; photoinhibition and photoprotection; photorespiration and the evolution of C4 photosynthesis; CAM photosynthesis as adaptation to limited water availability; response of plants to elevated CO2; vegetation change and carbon sinks; effect of climate change on senescence and other phenological events; atmospheric pollution and acid rain; gaseous NOx and NHy pollution; ozone pollution.
PHAYG107PortfolioPG0School of Pharmacy
PHAR2006Practical PharmacologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesA selection of practicals and follow-up sessions designed for students taking Pharmacology PHAR2002 It provides reinforcement of the material in those courses and also aims to develop practical skills.
PSYCRC07Practical StatisticsUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
ANATGS10Practice of SciencePG30Division of Biosciences
PLIN2002Pragmatic TheoryUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module explores the nature of human communication and the relation between the linguistic encoding of meaning and the (much more extensive) speaker meaning communicated in context. Some recent theories of communication and utterance comprehension are introduced.
PLING201Pragmatic TheoryPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe following topics will be covered: - The goals of a pragmatic theory - The data of a pragmatic theory - Linguistic codes and pragmatic inference - Maxim-based approaches to pragmatics - The cognitive principle of relevance - The communicative principle of relevance - The nature of the context of interpretation - Disambiguation and reference assignment - Conversational implicature - Non-literal language use (metaphor and irony) - Pragmatics and the modularity of mind - Testing pragmatic theories
PLIN2004Pragmatics and CognitionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module explores several areas of pragmatics in which experimental research has been conducted in order to test opposing theories. A wide range of empirical studies will be examined, involving diverse methods (including behavioural, corpus and neurocognitive measures), and populations. The focus will be on the underlying theories.
PLING203Pragmatics and CognitionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module explores several areas of pragmatics in which experimental research has been conducted in order to test opposing theories. A wide range of empirical studies will be examined, involving diverse methods (including behavioural, corpus and neurocognitive measures), and populations. The focus will be on the underlying theories.
PHAYG062PreformulationPG15School of Pharmacy
PHAYM101Preparation for Professional Practice (Masters Level)UG1School of Pharmacy
PSYCGD02Principles of CognitionPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences This module outlines general theoretical principles that underlie cognitive processes across many domains, ranging from perception to language, to reasoning and decision making. The focus will be on general, quantitative regularities, and the degree to which theories focusing on specific cognitive scientific topics can be constrained by such principles. There will be an introduction on general methods and approaches in cognitive science and some of the problems related to them. Later in the course, some computational approaches in cognitive science will be discussed. There will be particular emphasis on understanding cognitive principles that are relevant to theories of decision making.
NEUR3002Principles of NeurosurgeryUG.5Division of BiosciencesNeurosurgery is a broad field covering a range of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that target pathological processes affecting the brain, spine and peripheral nerves. The course consists of a comprehensive course of lectures on neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and pathology, diagnostic techniques and therapeutic interventions.
HCSCGS21Professional and Clinical Studies IIPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis Module develops the students\' professional and clinical skills and promotes their transfer to a range of adult client groups and settings. It builds on skills developed during Year A of the course, and integrates skills and knowledge from all other Year B Modules, with the aim of highlighting the links between theory and practice. Modules HCSCGS22 (Management of Acquired Communication Difficulties) and 2.3/HCSCGS23 (Vocal Tract Structure & Function) are particularly relevant here. This Module includes clinical placements, supporting workshops and tutorials.
SLANG101Professional Studies 1PG45Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module addresses a range of transferable professional and clinical skills, knowledge, values and attitudes relevant to speech and language therapy practice and promotes the integration of theory and practice, with particular reference to working with children/young people. Learning takes place both in college and on clinical placements. SLANG101: Professional Studies 1 links closely to SLANG102: Management of Communication Disorders 1: Language and Cognition; SLANG103: Management of Communication Disorders 2: Speech and Hearing, and also to all other modules in year A, as it supports the integration of theory and practice. It also has close links to a number of year B modules, particularly SLANG201: Professional Studies 2. This module is relevant to many of the Health and Care Professions Council’s ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists.
SLANG201Professional Studies 2PG45Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module further develops a range of transferable professional and clinical skills, knowledge, values and attitudes relevant to speech and language therapy practice and promotes the integration of theory and practice, with particular reference to working with adults. Learning takes place both in college-based workshops and tutorials and on clinical placements. SLANG201: Professional Studies 2 builds on skills developed during Year A of the course, particularly in SLANG101: Professional Studies 1. It also links closely to SLANG202: Management of Communication Disorders 3: Language and Cognition (Acquired) and SLANG203: Management of Communication Disorders 4: Speech, Swallowing and Voice and also to all other modules in year B as it supports the integration of theory and practice. This module is relevant to many of the Health and Care Professions Council’s ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists.
PSYCGD05Programming for Cognitive SciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesComputing for Psychologists is a course for students with little or no prior experience in computer programming. Apart from using a computer, no prior knowledge is assumed. The course consists of 10 three-hour lecture sessions in which programming concepts are introduced and hands-on experience is provided. Programming assignments are set on a weekly basis to solidify concepts and provide further familiarity.
PLIN3601Progress Portfolio AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN3602Progress Portfolio BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGC99Project ReportPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGP31Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development 3: Latency and AdolescencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module explores the child’s growing sense of identity (including gender identity) during latency and adolescence as the child moves from the family into the wider social world. It will consider the role of the parents, family and cultural environment in facilitating the youngster’s trajectory to adulthood. The theory will be illustrated with clinical case presentations showing how the techniques and approach of psychoanalytic psychotherapy need to be modified to engage with latency-aged or adolescent-aged youngsters.
PSYCGP24Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development I: InfancyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module examines a variety of psychoanalytic theories of infant development from pregnancy through birth and to one year of age. These include the classical Psychoanalytic perspective the theories of Anna Freud, Klein, Winnicott and Lacan as well as Bowlby's attachment theory.
PSYCGP25Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development II: Toddlerhood and Early ChildhoodPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module focuses on normal development during toddler hood and early childhood from a psychoanalytic perspective. It includes the consideration of the role of play language and cognitive development and the child's developing understanding of the self and of family relationships.
PLING153Psycholinguistics: General ProcessingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course provides an introduction to the mechanisms and types of information people use to recognise, comprehend and produce words and sentences of natural languages. A selection from the following topics will be covered: - Psychology of reading: deep versus shallow processing - Priming & frequency effects - Introduction to Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis - Spoken Word Recognition - Sentence Processing - Semantic Interpretation - Context and Reference Assignment
PLIN7308Psycholinguistics: Stages in Normal Language DevelopmentUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces students to the scientific study of how language is acquired by typically developing children, with special emphasis on development after the onset of syntax, at around 2 years.
PSYC3104Psychology and EducationUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesTopics have been selected to illustrate the typical application of a wide range of psychological theory and research to educational practice. Aspects of both normal learning and development and atypical performance and behaviour are sampled and examples are drawn where possible from the professional practice of educational and child psychologists. The following areas are included: Motivation in education. Inclusion of children with special educational needs. Exclusion from school. School ethos and student identity. The use of language in school. Literacy development. Numeracy development. Dyslexia. Bullying. Restorative justice.
PALS3011Psychology of PoliticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYC9002APsychology Readings AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe Psychology Readings is designed to give students an opportunity to earn credit for reading articles and books in a specified area of psychology. The readings course will be supervised by a member of the psychology faculty who will meet with the student a minimum of once per week to discuss progress. The readings can be used to explore an area of psychology not offered in other courses by the department. Or, it can be used to allow the student to learn more about a previously taught topic in greater depth. The readings must culminate in the production of a written review paper (approx 5000 words). Please note that students can only take this course if they are able to find a member of faculty to supervise them.
PSYC9002BPsychology Readings BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe Psychology Readings is designed to give students an opportunity to earn credit for reading articles and books in a specified area of psychology. The readings course will be supervised by a member of the psychology faculty who will meet with the student a minimum of once per week to discuss progress. The readings can be used to explore an area of psychology not offered in other courses by the department. Or, it can be used to allow the student to learn more about a previously taught topic in greater depth. The readings must culminate in the production of a written review paper (approx 5000 words). Please note that students can only take this course if they are able to find a member of faculty to supervise them.
PSYC2400Psychology Study Abroad ModuleUG4Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
BIOL1002Quantitative BiologyUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn introduction to mathematical and quantitative methods for biology students. The course will be concerned with data collection and processing and will be illustrated with a range of biological examples eg., analysing the results of genetic crosses, investigating the prevalence of parasitic infections in insects, detecting skewed sex ratios and analysis of data collected from questionnaires.
BIOL1002AQuantitative Biology AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PLING224Readings in SyntaxPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an advanced exploration of one or more issues in syntactic theory. We will discuss seminal papers on and current approaches to some issue or issues of current interest in generative grammar. The topic for the course will change from year to year.
PLIN3202Readings in Syntax AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an advanced exploration of one or more issues in syntactic theory. We will discuss seminal papers on and current approaches to some issue or issues of current interest in generative grammar.
PHAR3004Receptor MechanismsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is about the mechanisms involved in the generation of a response following receptor activation, either by a natural hormone or neurotransmitter or by drug action, and how drugs may interfere with receptor-mediated responses. Mechanisms involving ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-dependent calcium channels and potassium channels, G-proteins, second messengers (e.g. inositol phosphates, diacylglycerol) and cellular kinases and phosphatases are then considered in detail, together with the role of calcium. A final section draws these themes together by examining integrated cell responses such as the control of the release of insulin from the pancreas. The course material is supplemented by group presentations and discussion of selected research papers related to the core lectures and by the preparation of an essay by each student.
PHARG004Receptor MechanismsPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course is about the mechanisms involved in the generation of a response following receptor activation, either by a natural hormone or neurotransmitter or by drug action, and how drugs may interfere with receptor-mediated responses. Mechanisms involving ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-dependent calcium channels and potassium channels, G-proteins, second messengers (e.g. inositol phosphates, diacylglycerol) and cellular kinases and phosphatases are then considered in detail, together with the role of calcium. A final section draws these themes together by examining integrated cell responses such as the control of the release of insulin from the pancreas. The course material is supplemented by group presentations and discussion of selected research papers related to the core lectures and by the preparation of an essay by each student.
PHARM004Receptor Mechanisms (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is about the mechanisms involved in the generation of a response following receptor activation, either by a natural hormone or neurotransmitter or by drug action, and how drugs may interfere with receptor-mediated responses. Mechanisms involving ligand-gated ion channels, voltage-dependent calcium channels and potassium channels, G-proteins, second messengers (e.g. inositol phosphates, diacylglycerol) and cellular kinases and phosphatases are then considered in detail, together with the role of calcium. A final section draws these themes together by examining integrated cell responses such as the control of the release of insulin from the pancreas. The course material is supplemented by group presentations and discussion of selected research papers related to the core lectures and by the preparation of an essay by each student.
PHAR3004AReceptor Mechanisms AUG.5Division of Biosciences
ANATG008Receptors and Synaptic SignallingPG15Division of BiosciencesHow the world of ion channels, neurotransmitters and their receptors contribute to neuronal processing will be explored. From the biophysical properties of ion channels to exploring their role in synaptic plasticity and neuropathologies.
PALS3006Rehabilitation of Acquired Neurogenic Communication DifficultiesUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is concerned with how a proficient language user is affected by brain injury. It will examine how frameworks, theories, and models from a number of different areas, but in particular cognitive neuropsychology, can inform clinical assessment and remediation of adult acquired language disorders. In addition, it will review how studies of rehabilitation have informed our understanding of models of language processing and our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the recovery process. The sessions will cover different aspects of language breakdown: • auditory processing • single word speech processing • thinking for speaking and sentence processing • reading and writing
PALSG302Rehabilitation of Acquired Neurogenic Communication DifficultiesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesRecovery from aphasia; what and how? Auditory single word input processing: levels of breakdown and remediation Spoken word production: levels of breakdown and remediation Sentence processing: levels of breakdown and remediation Reading and writing difficulties: levels of breakdown and remediation
PHAYG104Research and EvaluationPG20School of Pharmacy
SLANG106Research and Evidence-Based PracticePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module aims to familiarize students with the methodological approaches in qualitative and quantitative mixed methods research. These approaches will be explored using clinical examples and research articles that demonstrate concepts well and are relevant to Speech and Language Therapy (SLT).There will be a strong emphasis on critical appraisal and consideration of covariates, confounds and biases and how these can affect the interpretation of results. Students will develop a good understanding of evidence based practice, service evaluation, questionnaire design and different quantitative and qualitative methods. The module will include some basic practical statistics and their application to SLT assessment, practice and research. This module links closely with other modules in year A and B, in particular SLANG205, Research Methods and SLANG206Research Project. This module is relevant to the Health and Care Professions Council ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists relating to assuring the quality of their practice and awareness of the principles and applications of scientific enquiry and the research process.
PSYC2203Research and Quantitative Methods in PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course builds on PSYC1103, the First Year laboratory course. The main aim of the course is to enable students to design and carry out a piece of experimental work, to analyse it, and to write a report. Students carry out four labs, one in each of the following areas: Visual Perception, Language/Cognition, Body Awareness and Constructing and using Questionnaires. The fifth project (mini project) is carried out in an area selected by the student, and is supervised by an appropriate member of staff.
PALS2006Research Design and Experimental MethodsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents learn some advanced principles of research methodology. Furthermore, advanced statistical methods including partial correlation, multiple linear regression, logistic regression, and different forms of analysis of variance (ANOVA) are introduced. It is assumed that students attending the module have a basic understanding of experimental research methodology, descriptive statistics and basic inferential statistics (t-tests and non-parametric statistics). The mathematical content of this course is minimal and we use computers for all but the simplest calculations.
PSYCGB99Research DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN50Research DissertationPG100Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents undertake a piece of independent research during their 2nd year. This work is supervised by a member of UCL/AFC staff (who all hold honorary UCL contracts). The research project will encourage students to integrate their theoretical and clinical learning, and consider an issue/question relevant to developmental psychopathology from both domains.
HCSCGS01Research Evidence and Design IPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module aims to familiarise students with methodological approaches in qualitative and quantitative research and enable students to choose appropriate methodologies for their own particular research question. The different approaches will be explored using clinical examples, and there is a strong emphasis on critical appraisal of research evidence. Students will develop a thorough understanding of evidence based practice, service evaluations, and the phases to conducting clinical research.
HCSCGS02Research Evidence and Design IIPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe ways in which clinicians and educationalists establish an holistic view of their clients/pupils and plan intervention accordingly has strong parallels with the ways in which causal models are constructed and tested. The module therefore aims to familiarise students with the approaches used in causal modelling of data. It will cover a range of regression approaches (Linear, Logistic, Log-linear, Multiple hierarchical) by exploring literature and examining the importance of the approaches for different circumstances. The ideas behind structural equation modelling will be explored and students will use examples from their own experiences to develop conceptual models. The course has a strong practical and literature-based foundation.
HCSCGS03Research in PracticePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims to develop in students the knowledge and skills required for planning, implementation and management of research with clinical populations in workplace contexts. This is targeted through developing an appreciation of ethical and scientific quality standards for the design, conduct and recording research involving humans, including public engagement in research. Thus the module brings together students’ research interests with knowledge of research methods gained from companion modules within the programme and new learning in clinical research governance, to support the development of students’ coherent research plans. As such, the module also provides a thorough preparation for a subsequent MRes project centred on research with clinical populations.
HCSCGS25Research MethodsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis Module introduces students to research methods and statistical analyses relevant to the study of communication disorders, enabling access to literature relevant to all Modules and providing knowledge and skills relevant to Module HCSCGS26 (Project).
SLANG205Research MethodsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims to further develop students’ understanding of research design and statistical methods used in speech and language research and in the evaluation of therapy for communication disorders. It provides direct experience and knowledge of methods used to investigate and evaluate clinically relevant topics. Students will learn how to select and apply a range of statistical analysis methods in experimental research by exploring literature and understanding the importance of the various approaches for different circumstances. The course has a strong practical and literature-based foundation.
PSYCGN32Research Methods 1: Research SkillsPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGP98Research Methods and DissertationPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course of lectures and seminars aims to develop the understanding and skills necessary to carry out high quality psychoanalytically and developmentally informed research, developing a research question, reviewing the relevant literature, devising an appropriate research design, undertaking data collection, using the correct methods of analysis and writing up a psychological report. It aims to cover the conceptual foundations of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, and consideration of their appropriate uses. The course aims to develop critical reading and evaluation skills, the techniques necessary to conduct literature searches (electronically and via libraries), and those relevant to writing a psychological report.
PALSGM01Research Methods and StatisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN27Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical AnalysisPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will cover a range of topics in descriptive and inferential statistics including: sampling distributions, descriptive statistics, measures of association and measures of difference. Methods for evaluating reliability and validity will also be addressed. The emphasis will be on carrying out statistical tests using SPSS and interpreting and communicating the results of analysis effectively.
PSYCRC04Research Methods in Clinical PsychologyUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PALSG102Research Methods: Principles, Skills and ApplicationsPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAutumn Term Introduction to research design Describing groups of data Variability and distributions Tests, standardisation and z-scores Independence and dependence of data, correlation Estimation and confidence intervals Inferential statistics: Two-sample tests Analysis of Variance Two-way ANOVA for independent groups ANOVAs with within-subject factors Linear regression Chi - squared Revision followed by practice exam Revision and Mock Exam Feedback Exam Spring term Linear regression Chi - squared Introduction to multiple regression Using multiple regression to evaluate processing models Introduction to ANCOVA Using ANCOVA to track developmental trajectories Introduction to single case analysis Comparison of single case analysis from different theoretical approaches
PALSGM98Research PlanPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN97Research PortfolioPG195Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
HCSCGS26Research ProjectPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis Module introduces students to the conduct of research in an area relevant to the practice of speech and language therapy, and links closely with HCSCGS25 (Research Methods).
HCSCGS99Research ProjectPG120Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PALS3901Research ProjectUG1Division of Psychology and Language SciencesAll BSc PALS projects must be empirical in nature, and entail the investigation of a psychological research question from an analysis of data. It is a requirement that the student collects data from human participants and that this forms a significant part of the data that is analysed for the project. Data collected by the student may be combined with or compared to other new or existing data for analysis. Projects must observe the Code of Ethics and Conduct of the British Psychological Society and the student must provide of evidence that any data analysed was collected with appropriate ethical approval.
PALSGM99Research ProjectPG105Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYC3901Research ProjectUG1Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis is an empirical, usually experimental, piece of research on a psychological topic of the student's own choice. Projects are completed under the supervision of a member of staff. There are two pieces of work which contribute to the module mark: The first piece, the Research Proposal, is worth 10% of the total mark for the Project (guideline length 1000 words). The main project report is worth 90% of the module mark.
SLANG099Research ProjectPG60Division of Psychology and Language SciencesStudents will apply knowledge and skills gained in research design, research governance and management etc., covered in the modules SLANG106 Research and Evidence Based Practice, and SLANG205 Research Methods, to carry out a research project drawing on theoretical and/or clinical issues of importance to populations with communication disorders. Guidance about the general process of selecting and carrying out a project will be provided by the module coordinator and students receive guidance and formative feedback from a named project supervisor(s). This module is relevant to the Health & Care Professions Council ‘Standards of Proficiency’ for speech and language therapists relating to practising within the legal and ethical boundaries of their profession, understanding the importance of and being able to maintain confidentiality, communicating effectively, assuring the quality of their practice, and being able to draw on appropriate knowledge and skills to inform practice.
PHAYGX93Research Project - MSc Experimental Pharmacology and TherapeuticsPG90School of Pharmacy
PHAYMX98Research Project (Masters Level)UG2School of Pharmacy
PHAYGX98Research Project for MSc PharmaceuticsPG60School of Pharmacy
BIOC2009Research Project FoundationsUG0Division of BiosciencesThis module introduces the use of online referencing software such as Reference Manager or Endnote. A workshop allows the student to have hands on experience of the use of these technologies and to complete an exercise using one example of the software.
PHOL3904Research Project in PhysiologyUG1.5Division of BiosciencesA research based project allowing final year BSc students to conduct original research in the laboratory of a member of academic staff or in one of the Biosciences laboratories of our associated Institutes.
PLING401Research Skills in LinguisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe two-term syllabus consists of workshops devoted to research methods in linguistics:
- how to plan a one-year project
- how to conduct library research
- how to read a paper with statistical analysis
- how to write an abstract for a conference
- how to present a poster, and related topics.
In the second term, students pursuing an experimentally-oriented project will have a workshop on experimental design, while students pursuing a more theoretically-based research topic will participate in a workshop on software for tree-drawing, phonetic typesetting and bibliography management.
BIOCM102Research Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesA post doc led tutorial series on cutting edge techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology will be coupled with journal club style sessions to explore the subject in more detail. Assessment of student performance is via a 1500-word ‘news and views’ type report on the content of one of the external seminars and via a 2000-word review of a biochemistry/structural biology/molecular biology technique and its contribution/potential contribution to the field.
CELLG102Research Techniques in Cell BiologyPG15Division of BiosciencesStudents attend a weekly seminar given by external speakers (LMCB Monday 4pm or CDB Thursday 1pm). A workshop on this aspect of the module, what the students should expect and what is expected from the students will be given at the start of the module. Seminar attendance will be monitored and this part of the module will be assessed by a ‘news and views’ style report of a seminar given by an external speaker. This will be marked ‘in house’ but, where possible, comments on the article from the seminar speaker will be sought. A tutorial series focussing on cutting edge techniques in cell biology will be coupled with lab/facility visits. Students will be given one review and one primary research paper to read before each tutorial. This element of the module will be assessed by a 2,000-word review in which the student focuses on one assigned technique and discusses the contribution/potential contribution of the technique to cell biology.
CELLM102Research Techniques in Cell Biology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesStudents attend one of either the weekly internal seminars that take place in CDB OR the weekly internal seminars in the LMCB. In addition attendance at external cell biology seminars in CDB and the LMCB is compulsory. A tutorial series on cutting edge techniques in cell biology will be coupled with lab visits to explore the technology in more detail. Assessment of student performance is via a 1500-word ‘news and views’ type report on the content of one of the external seminars and via a 2000-word review of a cell biological technique and its contribution/potential contribution to the field. In addition the students attend the Skills Exchange Workshop in the LMCB, a post-doc/PhD student led workshop discussing technical issues with new techniques being used in the Division.
PSYCRC99Research ThesisUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRE99Research ThesisUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRERTResearch ThesisUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHOLG004RespirationPG15Division of BiosciencesThis course examines the control of breathing particularly in humans, in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological conditions including exercise, altitude, sleep and asthma. The relationship between respiratory function, structural anatomy and pathological states are explored.
PHOL3001Respiration in Health and DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course examines the control of breathing particularly in humans, in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological conditions including exercise, altitude, sleep and asthma. The relationship between respiratory function, structural anatomy and pathological states are explored.
PHOLM001Respiration in Health and Disease (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course examines the control of breathing particularly in humans, in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological conditions including exercise, altitude, sleep and asthma. The relationship between respiratory function, structural anatomy and pathological states are explored.
PHAY1001Role of the Pharmacist in Health CareUG1School of PharmacyThis module introduces students to their future role as pharmacists and the current and evolving pharmacy profession. To prepare students for roles as health care professionals, they need to understand the responsibilities they have towards their patients and other members of the health care team. The knowledge, skills and attitudes required for pharmacy practice are introduced and developed throughout the module. Knowledge and skills obtained in the other year one modules are applied here when discussing the use of medicines and pharmacy practice. In addition, the year 1 "study skills" theme is housed in this module.
BIOL2013Second Year Core SkillsUG0Division of BiosciencesStudents will attend personal tutorials at which key skill questionnaires providing self assessment of progress in key skills will be discussed and monitored. In the post exam period in term 3 they will attend a lecture on essay writing, and use of literature references. They will then, in the same period, prepare a short (1000 word) referenced introduction to their third year project and become proficient with reference management software
PALSG306Second-Language Speech LearningPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module will examine the development of speech perception and speech production during second language acquisition. It will review: experimental methods used for testing speech perception and production, interference between first- and second-language phonetics and phonology, changes in first-language processing resulting from second-language learning, explanations for the decline in plasticity with age, comparisons with early bilingualism, comparisons with first-language acquisition, comparisons with other examples of adult plasticity (e.g., stroke recovery, acclimatization to a cochlear implant), effects of learning more than two languages, links between perception and production, effects of auditory processing vs. linguistic categorization, effects of noise and hearing impairment on second-language speech perception, and training methods for second-language speech learning.
PLIN3003Semantic-Pragmatic DevelopmentUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module focuses on children's developing pragmatic competence and, within this domain, a selection from the following topics will be covered: - The acquisition of various cognitive abilities necessary for full-fledged linguistic communication (e.g., grasp of understanding of common ground). - The development and understanding of pointing and ostensive gestures. - The role of pragmatics in language acquisition, and in particular, word learning. - The early production and understanding of pronouns. - The early production and understanding of quantifiers. - The early production and understanding of scalar inferences (and other types of implicatures). - The early production and understanding of non-literal language (metaphor and irony).
PLING210Semantic-Pragmatic DevelopmentPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module focuses on children's developing pragmatic competence and, within this domain, a selection from the following topics will be covered: - The acquisition of various cognitive abilities necessary for full-fledged linguistic communication (e.g., grasp of understanding of common ground). - The development and understanding of pointing and ostensive gestures. - The role of pragmatics in language acquisition, and in particular, word learning. - The early production and understanding of pronouns. - The early production and understanding of quantifiers. - The early production and understanding of scalar inferences (and other types of implicatures). - The early production and understanding of non-literal language (metaphor and irony).
PLING103Semantics and PragmaticsPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe following topics will be covered: - Propositional logic (syntax, semantics, proofs) - Predicate logic (syntax, semantics, proofs) - Comparing logic to natural language - Lexical semantics and the nature of concepts - Formal theories of natural language semantics - Syntax-semantics interface - Semantics/pragmatics distinction - Explicit/implicit distinction - Linguistic underdeterminacy of speaker meaning - Kinds of context-sensitivity and pragmatic processes - Gricean pragmatics - Relevance-theoretic pragmatics - Semantics, pragmatics and cognitive modularity - Disambiguation and reference assignment - Non-literal language use (metaphor and irony) - Conversational implicature - Pragmatic inference and theory of mind
PLING101Semantics and Pragmatics IPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesA selection from the following topics will be covered: - Propositional logic (syntax, semantics, proofs) - Comparing logic to natural language - Lexical semantics and the nature of concepts - Semantics/pragmatics distinction - Explicit/implicit distinction - Linguistic underdeterminacy of speaker meaning - Kinds of context-sensitivity and pragmatic processes - Gricean pragmatics - Relevance-theoretic pragmatics - Semantics, pragmatics and cognitive modularity - Disambiguation and reference assignment - Non-literal language use (metaphor and irony) - Conversational implicature - Pragmatic inference and theory of mind.
PLING228Semantics Research SeminarPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesWe will read and discuss current and classic literature on the semantics of questions. Topics to be covered, following a general introduction, include theoretical issues involving embedded questions, their relationship with embedded declaratives, multiple questions, de re and dicto reading of questions, and possibly more depending on time and interest. The class will presuppose familiarity with possible worlds semantics.
PALSG208Seminar in NeurolinguisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe goal of the neuroscience of language is to understand the mechanisms engaged during language comprehension and production and their neurological underpinnings. In this course we will discuss different theoretical positions on language implementation in the brain across different levels of representation (eg, morphology (words), syntax (sentences), and concepts). These neurological/processing theories will make use of distinctions that arise from linguistic theory.
PLIN7317Seminar on Expressive ProsodyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will survey a wide range of topics on expressive speech prosody, covering linguistic intonation, timing and rhythm, emotional and attitudinal expressions, vocal femininity and masculinity, charisma and attractiveness. We will also discuss relations between expressive prosody and music, and disorders such as Autism and aprosodia. These topics will be examined from both linguistic and evolutionary perspectives.
PLING231Seminar on Expressive ProsodyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module will survey a wide range of topics on expressive speech prosody, covering linguistic prosody, information structure, emotional and attitudinal expressions, sexual dimorphism, charisma and attractiveness. We will also discuss relations between expressive prosody and music, and disorders such as Autism and aprosodia. These topics will be examined from both linguistic and evolutionary perspectives.
BIOL3012Sex, Genes and EvolutionUG.5Division of BiosciencesBIOL3012 aims to cover modern aspects of evolutionary genetics. It will concentrate on (a) the evolution of sex and its consequences and (b) evolutionary conflicts between individuals and genes within individuals. A wide range of topics will be covered including: the evolutionary origins of sexual reproduction; the maintenance and consequences of selfish genetic elements (meiotic drive genes, cytoplasmic genes, transposable elements); the origin of the nucleus; sex determination; mitonuclear coadaptation; the evolution of sex chromosomes; the evolution of distinct sexes; the origin and evolution of social insects; sexual selection; sperm competition; genomic imprinting. The course is designed to attract students from a diverse range of backgrounds. In previous years, students have attended from Biology, Ecology, Genetics, Human Genetics, Human Sciences, Intercalated Medical Students, Zoology and the Natural Sciences. The course is suitable for 3rd and 4th year BSc and MSci, as well as G-level students.
PSYCGS05Social Cognition Research MethodsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module prepares students to collect social cognition experimental data by exploring the entire process, from the inception of an idea, to the formulation of a hypothesis, choosing of an experimental design, population, sample, and variables, and executing data collection, as well as preparing the data for statistical analysis. Students will also learn about scientific, ethical, and other considerations at each decision-point in this process, and how each decision shapes how results can be interpreted and the place of the experiment within the scientific literature on social cognition. Current debates and controversies regarding psychological and scientific methodology will be discussed. Proper completion of this module will assist students when executing their dissertation.
PSYCGS02Social Cognition, Affect and MotivationPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module examines the interplay between basic cognitive processes, affect, and motivation in the construction of social reality. It reviews knowledge about how the current states, feelings, and goals of the social perceiver affect judgment and behaviour, as well as how the social context affects the individuals’ ways of thinking, feeling, and regulating their behaviour. In particular, the module entails an examination of effects associated with mood, embodiment, approach-avoidance motivation, self-regulation, ego depletion and social factors that impact motivation and affect, such as power, status, social exclusion and minority status affect the emotion and motivation.
PSYCGS04Social NeurosciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course examines the neural mechanisms underlying human social behaviour. It draws on methods from cognitive neuroscience and research questions from social psychology to question fundamental aspects of how people interact in the world.
PSYC1202Social PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe themes, methods and ideas of social psychology will be introduced in this course. We will look at how individuals understand themselves and other people, the relationship between behaviour, self and the social situation, and the forces that govern interactions between individuals and groups. We will pay particular attention to the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience, and moves to understand social phenomena with the tools of cognitive and perceptual psychology.
PSYC3102Social PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module addresses contemporary theorizing and research in social psychology with an emphasis on social cognition and self-regulation. Domains that will be addressed include: automatic and controlled processes in social cognition; stereotype activation and inhibition; mood and subjective experiences; socially situated cognition; asymmetric social relations of status and power; imitation and behaviour complementarity; self-control and goal pursuit.
PSYCG102Social PsychologyPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3102 on the module database
PLIN7305SociolinguisticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course aims to introduce the ways in which spoken language can vary as a result of social factors such as class, age and gender.
PLING150SociolinguisticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesWhat does your accent say about you? Does your age or gender have an effect on how you speak? What about geography or social class? This course aims to develop students\' awareness of the complex relationship between spoken language and society through discussion of existing literature and through experience of handling data collected from studies of language variation. The focus will be on accent variation and change and so it is assumed that students will be familiar with basic concepts in phonetics and phonology. Understanding patterns of spoken language variation requires a multidisciplinary approach, and so during the course students will be introduced to aspects of historical linguistics, language acquisition, speech perception and production.
PSYCGI09Sociotechnical Systems: IT and the Future of WorkPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe technology we use is changing rapidly. New technical possibilities including developments in user interface design, access to networks and remote storage are bringing about changes as great as the introduction of personal computers in the 1980s. This module looks at these changes from the perspective of organizational psychology – in other words in the context of social relationships and organizational structures, processes and culture. Predicting the future is hazardous but we will also look at how the innovations we are experiencing are likely to lead to consequences for the nature of work. The module will be run in two streams, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical stream will look at the literature on job design and work organization, placing emphasis on ‘sociotechnical systems’. This is an approach which has been highly regarded over the last fifty years and which is now increasing in importance as researchers and practitioners realise that it addresses the issues which are clearly becoming relevant. The practical stream will look at a particular issue using ‘soft systems methodology’, an approach which explicitly deals with the difficulties raised by studying social and technical systems in their organizational context. The theoretical stream will be delivered through guided readings with presentations from outside contributors. These presentations will present relevant case studies, the role of social media and the important matter of security. The two streams will be assessed independently.
PSYCM009Sociotechnical Systems: IT and the Future of Work (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PHOL3009Space Medicine and Extreme Environment PhysiologyUG1Division of Biosciences
PHOLM009Space Medicine and Extreme Environment Physiology (Masters Level)UG1Division of Biosciences 1) To provide an understanding of the physiological effects of the space environment upon the human body and the biomedical problems associated with long and short duration manned space flight. 2) To explore the physiological effects of ascent to high altitude and understand the pathophysiology of altitude induced illnesses. 3) To understand the effects of the hyperbaric environment experienced underwater and the benefits of hyperbaric oxygen administer in a chamber. 4) To discuss the issues faced when travelling to areas of extreme temperature and how the body adapts to them.
PSYCGR13Special Research Methods (Options)PG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesIn this course, specialists from a variety of fields in psychology discuss the methods used in their own research area. These methodological seminars are grounded by showing their application to a particular theory or issue in psychology. Each option comprises five 1½ hour seminars, which include some practical work and demonstrations. Students take all four options, and write an essay for each. Students take all four available lecture series and complete a written assessment on all Options available may depending on demand, currently offered options are: Clinical Psychology Cognitive Psychology Cognitive Neuroscience Developmental Psychology
BIOLM008Species Conservation and Biodiversity (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences Humans are causing enormous changes in the natural environment, threatening the existence of many species and habitats. Conservation biology is the science behind efforts to stem this loss of natural diversity, drawing on a broad range of disciplines including ecology, evolution, and biogeography. This course uses a combination of lectures, discussions, and computer practical exercises to address key questions including: What is biodiversity? How much of the planet’s biodiversity remains undiscovered? What are the main threats to biodiversity? What are the main tools (e.g., computer models, monitoring techniques) used to study conservation issues? Why conserve biodiversity? In addressing these questions, students will learn about topics such as extinction risk, habitat fragmentation, climate change impacts, invasive species, reserve design, and environmental ethics. Students will develop an individual project through a series of computer labs, which will provide hands-on experience with Geographic Information Systems, ecological modelling, and remote sensing. Class discussions will tackle tricky debates such as over the relative merits of utilitarian versus intrinsic arguments for the value of biodiversity.
PSYC3205SpeechUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesTerminology from Phonetics. Pulmonary and laryngeal systems. Acoustic characteristics of phonation signal. Frequency response of vocal tract. Spectrographic representation of speech. Application to speech production: Levelt’s model of speech control and critique. The EXPLAN model of speech control Production: Speech timing –cerebellum, Wing-Kristofferson, STI, Down syndrome, Parkinson’s speech. Coarticulation-phenomena and theories. Speaker differences. Dialogue interaction Ethics of experimental work on production. DSM-IV and classification of speech disorders Effects of hearing problems on speech control (otitis media and cochlear implants). Agrammatic aphasia speech.Stuttering its diagnosis and treatment. Speech perception; phenomena and theories. Categorical perception. Perception of accented speech. Auditory scene analysis and applications to speech perception. Motor theory of speech perception and mirror neurons.
PSYCG205SpeechPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3205
PSYCM205Speech (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3205
PSYC3205ASpeech AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3205
PALS2002Speech Production and PerceptionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThrough this module, students will gain a better understanding of the process of spoken communication, with a focus on the production and perception of speech. The course will cover basic concepts in speech acoustics and speech perception. Students will also learn about research methods and instrumentation in these fields and will apply their knowledge to the description and investigation of speaker-listeners. Topics will include: • The source-filter model applied to vowels and consonants • Acoustic-phonetic characteristics of vowels, consonants and connected discourse • Basic principles of speech perception: use of acoustic, visual and linguistic cues • Speech-listener interaction • Development of speech perception • Speech perception in bilinguals/L2 learners • Speech and hearing science in professional contexts
PALS2002ASpeech Production and Perception AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module is a version suitable for Term 1 only affiliate students.
GENEG005Statistics for Interpreting Genetic DataPG15Division of BiosciencesThe module will provide an introduction to computer-based statistical methods of analyzing and interpreting genetics data. The topics to be covered include population genetics (both forward-in-time and backward-in-time models), the study of disease transmission in families (twin studies, segregation and linkage analysis), genetic epidemiology, Mendelian randomization, genetic association studies, genome-wide analyses, fine mapping. The effects on association analyses of admixture and population stratification. The emphasis will be on students doing analyses in class, in groups, and on their own, and on their interpretation of the results.
GENEM005Statistics for Interpreting Genetic Data (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module will provide an introduction to computer-based statistical methods of analyzing and interpreting genetics data. The topics to be covered include population genetics (both forward-in-time and backward-in-time models), the study of disease transmission in families (twin studies, segregation and linkage analysis), genetic epidemiology, Mendelian randomization, genetic association studies, genome-wide analyses, fine mapping. The effects on association analyses of admixture and population stratification. The emphasis will be on students doing analyses in class, in groups, and on their own, and on their interpretation of the results.
CELL3001Stem Cells and Regenerative MedicineUG.5Division of BiosciencesIntroduction; self renewal and differentiation: totipotency-pluripotency-unipotency; stem cells & gene therapy; neural stem cells; haemopoietic stem cells; normal limb development and bone stem cells; limb regeneration; regeneration in fish; retinal repair; CNS repair; connective tissue engineering; cartilage & tracheal repair; wound healing / repair; fracture healing; muscle repair; orthopaedic bioengineering; haemopoietic stem cell transplantation; challenges in good manufacturing practice; translation; ethics.
CELLG001Stem Cells and Regenerative MedicinePG15Division of BiosciencesIntroduction; self renewal and differentiation: totipotency-pluripotency-unipotency; stem cells & gene therapy; neural stem cells; haemopoietic stem cells; normal limb development and bone stem cells; limb regeneration; regeneration in fish; retinal repair; CNS repair; connective tissue engineering; cartilage & tracheal repair; wound healing / repair; fracture healing; muscle repair; orthopaedic bioengineering; haemopoietic stem cell transplantation; challenges in good manufacturing practice; translation; ethics.
CELLM001Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesIntroduction; self renewal and differentiation: totipotency-pluripotency-unipotency; stem cells & gene therapy; neural stem cells; haemopoietic stem cells; normal limb development and bone stem cells; limb regeneration; regeneration in fish; retinal repair; CNS repair; connective tissue engineering; cartilage & tracheal repair; wound healing / repair; fracture healing; muscle repair; orthopaedic bioengineering; haemopoietic stem cell transplantation; challenges in good manufacturing practice; translation; ethics.
PHOL2005Structure and Function of Nervous SystemsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module is an introduction to neurobiology, and is aimed at students who are planning further studies in the area of neuroscience. It covers neural structure and function, organisation of the vertebrate nervous system, sensory pathways and perception, neurochemistry and pharmacology and the neural basis of behaviour. The module is available in the second year. It assumes a basic knowledge of biological principles (e.g. A-level). The module is taught jointly by staff from the research departments of Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB), and Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology (NPP), and is intended to complement modules with more specialised neurobiology content.
PHOL2005AStructure and Function of Nervous SystemsUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module is an introduction to neurobiology, and is aimed at students who are planning further studies in the area of neuroscience. It covers neural structure and function, organisation of the vertebrate nervous system, sensory pathways and perception, neurochemistry and pharmacology and the neural basis of behaviour. The module is available in the second year. It assumes a basic knowledge of biological principles (e.g. A-level). The module is taught jointly by staff from the research departments of Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB), and Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology (NPP), and is intended to complement modules with more specialised neurobiology content.
PSYCGC14Structure and Function of the BrainPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module outlines basic neuroanatomy and measurement of the human and animal brain. Students will be taught physiological and structural principles underlying the anatomical organization of the brain and the functional segregation of higher cognitive functions. The material is tailored for cognitive neuroscientists. Aspects of how to measure and label the brain will be discussed.
PLING205Studies in Pragmatics ResearchPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe two-term syllabus consists of weekly reading and tutorial discussion of a key paper published in the field of pragmatics, including both classic papers, such as Grice's 'Meaning', 'Logic and Conversation', Sperber & Wilson's 'Relevance Theory', and a range of more recent research papers on current issues in pragmatics. By the middle of the second term, students are required to have delineated their own research topic, in discussion with the course tutor, on which they will give a short presentation at the end of the term and will develop a research-oriented essay.
PLIN7109StutteringUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe recently-released film The King's Speech has raised public awareness of stuttering. Stuttering is a disorder that usually starts in childhood and most cases recover by teenage. One in twenty children start to stutter, but this drops by teenage to one in 100. Few teenagers who stutter recover in later life (it appears that George VI was the one in 100). Considerable effort has been directed at identifying which children who stutter will recover and which will not, a matter of importance for the individual and society alike. Comparison of groups of people who persist or recover suggests several factors may be significant. Biological (genetics and brain differences), linguistic and motor factors, and type of stuttering symptom are reliably reported to differ between such groups. This course gives the student the skills to evaluate the evidence, theories and practical issues associated with stuttering in early childhood (close to onset) and into teenage and beyond. Factors that affect the onset and course of stuttering are examined from various perspectives. After preliminary description of the patterns of stuttering, how it is measured, who it affects and what its symptoms are, lectures examine evidence that stuttering is associated with a range of biological and psychological factors. Particular emphasis is given to how language and motor demands affect stuttering. Theoretical accounts that attempt to integrate these findings are critically assessed. The final part of the course applies the knowledge to practical issues (treatment, diagnosis and prognosis). As well as giving a comprehensive coverage about stuttering, this course also has relevance to other speech-language disorders. The course has been developed so that no background in related disciplines is assumed.
PLIN7109AStutteringUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesApart from the method of assessment, this module is identical to PLIN7109, see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lifesciences-faculty-php/courses/search.php?action=single&coursecode=PLIN7109
PLING300StutteringPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe recently-released film The King's Speech has raised public awareness of stuttering. Stuttering is a disorder that usually starts in childhood and most cases recover by teenage. One in twenty children start to stutter, but this drops by teenage to one in 100. Few teenagers who stutter recover in later life (it appears that George VI was the one in 100). Considerable effort has been directed at identifying which children who stutter will recover and which will not, a matter of importance for the individual and society alike. Comparison of groups of people who persist or recover suggests several factors may be significant. Biological (genetics and brain differences), linguistic and motor factors, and type of stuttering symptom are reliably reported to differ between such groups. This course gives the student the skills to evaluate the evidence, theories and practical issues associated with stuttering in early childhood (close to onset) and into teenage and beyond. Factors that affect the onset and course of stuttering are examined from various perspectives. After preliminary description of the patterns of stuttering, how it is measured, who it affects and what its symptoms are, lectures examine evidence that stuttering is associated with a range of biological and psychological factors. Particular emphasis is given to how language and motor demands affect stuttering. Theoretical accounts that attempt to integrate these findings are critically assessed. The final part of the course applies the knowledge to practical issues (treatment, diagnosis and prognosis). As well as giving a comprehensive coverage about stuttering, this course also has relevance to other speech-language disorders. The course has been developed so that no background in related disciplines is assumed.
PHAR3011Synaptic Pharmacology: The Synapse - A Major Site for Disease and Drug ActionUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe way in which synapses, and the receptors and ion channels present therein, function is central to our understanding of a major component of modern Pharmacology and is an extremely active area of basic and applied research.
PHARG011Synaptic Pharmacology: The Synapse - A Major Site for Disease and Drug ActionPG15Division of Biosciences
PLING227SyntaxPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course introduces students to the scientific study of the structure of sentences. Students will be introduced to tree structures, argument structure, case theory, and movement phenomena. The course also aims to sharpen students' analytical skills through problem discovery and problem solving exercises. In the second term, the course deals with one or more topics that involve the interface between the syntax and a syntax-external system. The latter could be the interpretive system, the phonology, or the parser. The exact contents change from year to year, to reflect developments in the field and the lecturer's own research. However, the course will always involve the reading of recent research papers, class presentations by students, the writing of an individual research project, and of an essay that reports on the outcomes of that project.
PLING121Syntax IPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course introduces students to the scientific study of the structure of sentences. Students will be introduced to tree structures, argument structure, case theory, and movement phenomena. The course also aims to sharpen students\' analytical skills through problem discovery and problem solving exercises.
PSYCGN72Systemic Family Practice: Basic SkillsPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN71Systemic Family Practice: Conduct DisorderPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN70Systemic Family Practice: Depression and Self HarmPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCGN74Systemic Family Practice: Eating DisordersPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
ANATG010Systems and Circuit NeurosciencePG15Division of BiosciencesThe module discusses systems and circuit analysis using a variety of techniques from optogenetics in Drosophila to human neuroimaging and computational modeling. The systems covered span from the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, reinforcement and learning in the striatum, to somatosensation and synaptic plasticity and memory.
PHOL2003Systems NeuroscienceUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis neurophysiology course aims to advance and consolidate knowledge gained during the first year course PHOL1001. It will allow students to develop specialist interests in motor and sensory physiology. The course also provides a forum to develop transferable skills.
PSYCGB02Talent ManagementPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes, core processes, methods, and theories of personnel selection, training and development, and career success. In particular, lectures will discuss the psychological determinants of job performance and career potential, interventions designed to motivate and retain employees, and the socio-economic implications of selecting, developing and retaining talent. Core constructs to be examined include abilities and personality traits, and the most widely used methods for selection (interviews, references, letters of recommendation and psychometric testing). Lectures will also discuss executive coaching techniques and training strategies in the current world of organisations. Thus this course examines the practical implications of talent management, as well as how psychological theories and methods can help us predict, understand, and influence talent in organisations.
BIOL2010The Biology of DevelopmentUG.5Division of BiosciencesAn introduction to the modern science of development covering a variety of organisms and discussing evolutionary, cellular and genetic bases of animal development. The study of development is one of the most exciting areas of modern biology. As a field which unites morphology with molecular genetics, it is relevant to biologists studying programmes from zoology to human genetics and biomedical sciences. Specific topics covered include development of the embryonic axes in mouse, fly, frog and sea urchin models. The role of homeodomain proteins and other developmental regulators in setting up the body plan. The development of the vertebrate limb and the nervous system. Development and evolution and development and ageing.
PSYC3210The Brain in ActionUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences1. Introduction and theoretical framework 2. Methods for studying the brain in action 3. Primary motor cortex and motor execution 4. Premotor areas: hierarchical or competitive action planning 5. Visuomotor pathways for praxis: parietal-premotor circuits 6. Supplementary motor area and free will 7. Free won’t: withholding actions 8. Basal Ganglia: circuits and neurotransmitters, actions and goals 9. Basal Ganglia diseases: Parkinsonism, Tourette’s 10. Cerebellum: motor prediction and motor learning 11. The actions of others: Mirror neuron system 1 12. The actions of others: Mirror neuron system 2 13. Tool Use 14. Mentalising using the action system 15. Action and Social cognition
PSYCG210The Brain in ActionPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3210 on the module database
PSYCM210The Brain in Action (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciencessee PSYC3210
PHOL3006The Cellular Basis of Brain FunctionUG1Division of BiosciencesThe module covers the description of brain function from Molecule, to Cell and to System levels. The detailed topics include: 1) Methods, ion channels, channelopathies, transporters and ischaemia; 2) Synaptic transmission, plasticity, integration and dendrites; 3) Metabolism, microcircuits, coding, sensory processing, neural networks and the control of behaviour. This structure is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the cellular mechanisms of brain function in health and disease.
PHOL3006AThe Cellular Basis of Brain FunctionUG1Division of BiosciencesThe module covers the description of brain function from Molecule, to Cell and to System levels. The detailed topics include: 1) Methods, ion channels, channelopathies, transporters and ischaemia; 2) Synaptic transmission, plasticity, integration and dendrites; 3) Metabolism, microcircuits, coding, sensory processing, neural networks and the control of behaviour. This structure is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the cellular mechanisms of brain function in health and disease.
PHOLM006The Cellular Basis of Brain Function (Masters Level)UG1Division of BiosciencesThe module covers the description of brain function from Molecule, to Cell and to System levels. The detailed topics include: 1) Methods, ion channels, channelopathies, transporters and ischaemia; 2) Synaptic transmission, plasticity, integration and dendrites; 3) Metabolism, microcircuits, coding, sensory processing, neural networks and the control of behaviour. This structure is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the cellular mechanisms of brain function in health and desease.
PSYCGP32The Clinical Theory of PsychoanalysisPG15Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
NEUR3031The Control of MovementUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe module begins by considering the anatomy and physiology of essential components of the motor system; muscles and the motor unit; proprioception; spinal integration; ascending and descending pathways in the spinal cord; motor cortex; basal ganglia and cerebellum. The integrated action of these systems in locomotion, voluntary movements and eye movements is considered. The module includes tutorials with target papers through the course and concludes with analyses of motor learning and modelling of motor control. Movement is a very large and important part of what it is that we do. From speaking to running, from fixating an object in the visual field to reaching out and grasping it, movement is the major measurable behavioural output of our nervous systems. In this module, we will examine the motor system in its entirety, from the muscles and motoneurons that form the final common pathway for movement, to the brain systems that contribute to our ability to decide when a movement should be made and what form it should take. The module takes a systems-level approach. The anatomy and physiology of muscles and motoneurons, spinal integration and supraspinal control from the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia will be introduced. The engagement of these systems in locomotion, in the control of posture and balance, in the control of eye movements and in the voluntary control of limb movements will be considered in detail. Mechanisms of motor learning in reflex calibration and in development of motor skills will be discussed, and the module concludes with discussion of cognitive aspects of motor control and the mechanisms that provide the transition from thought to action. The module is well-suited to third year MBBS students who have previously studied the "Neuroscience and Behaviour" and to BSc students who have studied the "Structure and Function of the Nervous System" module (PHOL2005).
NEURG031The Control of MovementPG15Division of Biosciences The module begins by considering the anatomy and physiology of essential components of the motor system; muscles and the motor unit; proprioception; spinal integration; ascending and descending pathways in the spinal cord; motor cortex; basal ganglia and cerebellum. The integrated action of these systems in locomotion, voluntary movements and eye movements is considered. The module includes tutorials with target papers through the course and concludes with analyses of motor learning and modelling of motor control. Movement is a very large and important part of what it is that we do. From speaking to running, from fixating an object in the visual field to reaching out and grasping it, movement is the major measurable behavioural output of our nervous systems. In this module, we will examine the motor system in its entirety, from the muscles and motoneurons that form the final common pathway for movement, to the brain systems that contribute to our ability to decide when a movement should be made and what form it should take. The module takes a systems-level approach. The anatomy and physiology of muscles and motoneurons, spinal integration and supraspinal control from the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia will be introduced. The engagement of these systems in locomotion, in the control of posture and balance, in the control of eye movements and in the voluntary control of limb movements will be considered in detail. Mechanisms of motor learning in reflex calibration and in development of motor skills will be discussed, and the module concludes with discussion of cognitive aspects of motor control and the mechanisms that provide the transition from thought to action. The module is well-suited to third year MBBS students who have previously studied the "Neuroscience and Behaviour" and to BSc students who have studied the "Structure and Function of the Nervous System" module (PHOL2005).
NEURM031The Control of Movement (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences The module begins by considering the anatomy and physiology of essential components of the motor system; muscles and the motor unit; proprioception; spinal integration; ascending and descending pathways in the spinal cord; motor cortex; basal ganglia and cerebellum. The integrated action of these systems in locomotion, voluntary movements and eye movements is considered. The module includes tutorials with target papers through the course and concludes with analyses of motor learning and modelling of motor control. Movement is a very large and important part of what it is that we do. From speaking to running, from fixating an object in the visual field to reaching out and grasping it, movement is the major measurable behavioural output of our nervous systems. In this module, we will examine the motor system in its entirety, from the muscles and motoneurons that form the final common pathway for movement, to the brain systems that contribute to our ability to decide when a movement should be made and what form it should take. The module takes a systems-level approach. The anatomy and physiology of muscles and motoneurons, spinal integration and supraspinal control from the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia will be introduced. The engagement of these systems in locomotion, in the control of posture and balance, in the control of eye movements and in the voluntary control of limb movements will be considered in detail. Mechanisms of motor learning in reflex calibration and in development of motor skills will be discussed, and the module concludes with discussion of cognitive aspects of motor control and the mechanisms that provide the transition from thought to action. The module is well-suited to third year MBBS students who have previously studied the "Neuroscience and Behaviour" and to BSc students who have studied the "Structure and Function of the Nervous System" module (PHOL2005).
PALS3010The Evolution of Vocal CommunicationUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module focuses on vocal communication in humans and other species from an evolutionary perspective. -Introduction to basic evolutionary principles (e.g., natural selection, adaptations and traits, convergent evolution, comparative method); -Imitation and learning: why are humans and some other species (e.g. parrots) such good imitators? Why do we spontaneously imitate others during conversation? -Comparative approach: songbirds learn to sing by imitating others. What can we learn about the evolution of speech by studying songbirds and other species that learn through vocal imitation? -Social factors: how do other humans and other species use vocal communication in a social context? -From gestures to speech: did vocal communication originate in gestural communication?
PLING151The Linguistics of Sign LanguagesPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course introduces students to the linguistic study of signed languages, including sign language phonology, morphology, syntax and sociolinguistic variation. The module will begin by introducing the notion of language modality and why it is important for linguists to study signed languages. The bulk of the module will focus within the core areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, lexicon, syntax, semantics/pragmatics, and discourse. Other areas covered will include language modality and sociolinguistic variation and language contact. The module will end by considering the implications of sign languages for language universals.
ANAT3028The Neurobiology of Neurodegenerative DiseaseUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe last few years have seen a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basic biological mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of mutations in a variety of genes, found to encode proteins present in neuro-pathological inclusions, has suggested that a common feature of all these diseases might be the intracellular accumulation of fibrous protein aggregates within neurons, resulting in neuronal cell death. This course will discuss this novel hypothesis in the light of contemporary research, and provide a foundation for our current understanding of neurodegenerative diseases. The 0.5 CU version of the module (ANAT3028) consists of the lecture series and is examined by one three-hour exam, whereas this 1.0 CU version (ANAT3029) comprises the same lectures and exam, but additionally requires submission of a 6,000 word dissertation together with a short (10 minute) oral presentation. It is recommended that students start thinking about their coursework essay in Term 1, even though the lectures are in Term 2.
ANATM028The Neurobiology of Neurodegenerative Disease (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Biosciences This course will focus on the genetics, and cellular and molecular biology of Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Motor Neurone disease, with the main emphasis on the mechanisms leading to cell death. A combination of lectures and video presentations will cover topics including: molecular genetics of HD, AD, PD and ALS, transgenic mouse models of human NDD, mechanisms of protein aggregation and degradation, cell biology of the neuronal response to injury, molecular pathways for cell death.
ANAT3028AThe Neurobiology of Neurodegenerative Disease AUG.5Division of Biosciences
PALS3005The Neurobiology of Speech ProcessingUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims to give students an understanding of the neural bases of speech perception and production. The course will focus on two methodologies: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). In the lectures on fMRI, we will present the challenges associated with imaging speech perception and production. In the lectures on TMS, we will discuss the unique contributions of TMS to theoretical development in the field of speech science. Students will use the acquired knowledge of research methods and instrumentation to gain a thorough appreciation of research papers that will be discussed in the seminars. Topics include: • Introduction to fMRI and TMS; • Study design in imaging speech perception and production; • Theories and models of spoken language processing; • Imaging plasticity in perception and production; • fMRI and TMS studies of neural recovery (e.g., aphasia); • Motor Evoked Potentials and the Motor Theory of Speech Perception.
PALSG207The Neurobiology of Speech ProcessingPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module aims to give students an understanding of the neural bases of speech perception and production. The course will focus on two methodologies: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). In the lectures on fMRI, we will present the challenges associated with imaging speech perception and production. In the lectures on TMS, we will discuss the unique contributions of TMS to theoretical development in the field of speech science. Students will use the acquired knowledge of research methods and instrumentation to gain a thorough appreciation of research papers that will be discussed in the seminars. Topics include: •Introduction to fMRI and TMS; •Study design in imaging speech perception and production; •Theories and models of spoken language processing; •Imaging plasticity in perception and production; •fMRI and TMS studies of neural recovery (e.g., aphasia); •Motor Evoked Potentials and the Motor Theory of Speech Perception.
BIOC1007The Principles and Practice of Experimental BiochemistryUG1Division of BiosciencesTERM 1 L1: Introduction to the course L2: Introduction to basic mathematics in the course L3: pH, pKa, buffers and equilibria L4: Free energy, redox potentials, pH electrodes L5-6: Spectrometry L7-9: Introduction to amino acids and sequencing L10-12: Basics of protein sequences and structures L13-15: Methods for determining protein structure TERM 2 L16-18: Design and interpretation of experiments L17-18: Statistics L19-21: Purifying proteins L22-24: Applications of Molecular Biology L25-28: Pathways and cycles L29-30: Use of isotopes
CELL2007The Principles of Cellular ControlUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course will provide a strong introduction to the principles of cellular regulation and range across molecular and cellular scales. Using key examples students will learn how molecular mechanisms orchestrate cellular processes. In a wider context cell signaling will serve as a vehicle for students to discover how to fuse an understanding of molecular concepts with macroscopic biology. Lectures will concentrate on: the molecular properties of different classes of receptors; the structure-function relationships of kinases, small and heterotrimeric G-proteins; second messenger molecules and the enzymes that generate them, structure-function in the recognition and binding of phosphoproteins and second messengers; signalling through polyphosphoinositides; integration of molecular-scale information into an understanding of major signaling pathways; adrenalin, insulin and EGF and the Wnt/catenin signaling pathways in example processes like energy metabolism, cancer biology, circadian rhythmicity and tissue differentiation.
PHAYG030The Process of Drug DevelopmentPG30School of Pharmacy
PHAYG029The Process of Drug DiscoveryPG30School of Pharmacy
PSYC1203The Psychology of Individual DifferencesUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course outlines how people differ in terms of their personality and aptitudes, how we can measure these differences, and what the causes might be. Students are introduced to the subject as a specialised area of study within psychology, and the course examines a full range of theories, research and measurement techniques, and applied and research aspects of individual difference psychology. In particular, students are expected to be able to critically examine the nature versus nurture controversy in the development of individual differences. Students will study, compare, and evaluate major theoretical perspectives on personality and mental ability. The work of the most influential theorists representing the major "schools of thought" (or paradigms) in personality and ability will be examined. Relevant research evidence supporting or refuting the theoretical formulations will be reviewed, including recent evidence from the emerging field of cognitive neuroscience. Students will learn to appreciate the contributions and limitations of each individual difference paradigm, and how it has impacted on other areas of specialisation in psychology.
BIOSG001The Scientific LiteraturePG15Division of BiosciencesA fundamental aspect of scientific research requires the ability to acquire information from original scientific papers, to analyse critically the content and quality of published scientific studies and to present and discuss the scientific literature with ones peers. Teaching will consist of seminars and discussion sessions.
PSYC3109The Social Psychology of RiskUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe focus of the module is how lay people in different cultures think, feel and behave in relation to a range of the risks that face them.
PSYCG109The Social Psychology of RiskPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesFor module information please search for module PSYC3109 on the module database
PSYC3109AThe Social Psychology of Risk AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3109
PALSGM02Theoretical FrameworksPG30Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC03Theory and Application of Clinical Psychology MethodsUG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYCRC06Theory and Application of Clinical Psychology Methods (Advanced Level)UG0Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PSYC3107Topics in Clinical PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesLectures cover general psychological processes in therapeutic encounters, specific problems and their treatment, particular models of intervention, and research on outcome of treatment. After an introduction to all lectures and discussion of efficacy of psychological therapies, early lectures address childhood disorders, followed by adult disorders, and the series closes with several lectures on processes of therapy and application to chronic health problems. The topics build upon those taught in PSYC2206, Clinical and Health Psychology, to minimise overlap, so it is an advantage to have taken this course but it is not a formal requirement.
BIOLM019Topics in Current Research (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis course is based on the seminar series of GEE and features invited speakers who are world-leading experts in their field. Students will attend the seminars as well as read, write and present about the topics being discussed. In addition, students will learn about public understanding of science, media constraints and how to communicate science to the public.
PSYC3110Topics in Developmental PsychologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesDr Schlottmann’s section considers a number of topics in normal cognitive development. One major area is the development of “higher” reasoning skills. Topics covered include: Formal operations and scientific reasoning, The development of logical reasoning, Analogical reasoning and transfer, Causal reasoning and perception. The other major topic area is the development of memory. Dr Rice's section will explore a variety of topics in normal and abnormal socio-emotional development. Topics include: The interface of nature and nurture in development, Prenatal influences, Deprivation and social development, The role of the family in emotional development, Growing up with a depressed parent: developmental implications, Developmental pathways: risk and resilience.
PSYC3303Topics in NeurobiologyUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe module is oriented around learning and memory, mainly using spatial and episodic memory as a model system with which to explore issues such as how neurons represent information, and how this representation is modified by experience. We will use multiple levels of description ranging from the genes contained within the neurons, through the proteins they make, the dynamical functions carried out by neurons (e.g., synaptic transmission, modification of connections etc.), the interactions of groups of neurons in circuits to form cognitive representations, and all the way up to the animal's macroscopic behaviour and how this interacts with the environment. By the end of the module students should have an understanding of how (relatively!) simple low-level processes create and interact with high level processes to produce the complex behaviours (such as navigation) exhibited by animals and humans.
PSYCM303Topics in Neurobiology (Masters Level)UG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3303
PSYC3303ATopics in Neurobiology AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesSee PSYC3303
PLIN2003Topics in Semantics and PragmaticsUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis course is an intermediate course on the study of meaning in natural language. It introduces logical concepts and their application in semantics and pragmatics.
PLING207Topics in Semantics and PragmaticsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course investigates two distinctions within the domain of utterance meaning: the semantics/pragmatics distinction and the explicit/implicit communication distinction. It focuses on several key cases of contentious data in order to reach a deeper understanding of how language, context and pragmatic principles interact.
GENEG006Understanding Bioinformatics Resources and Their ApplicationPG15Division of BiosciencesCompetency in genomic and proteomic resources is an essential skill for human disease genetic researchers. This module will enable students to experience first-hand how the annotation of the human genome is achieved and understand the uses and limitations of a wide range of freely available online resources. The course has four themes: (1) Online biological databases and their use for gene/SNP mapping, coding region identification, data extraction, including Ensembl, NCBIGene, UniProt, Biomart, OMIM, ChEBI, (2) Gene Ontology annotation and application, (3) Analysis of protein sequences and structure, including sequence alignment, structural and/or functional motif recognition, structure prediction, protein evolution, (4) Regulation of gene transcription, providing an introduction to this research area and the methods used to characterise proteins involved in gene regulation. Students will be required to undertake their own literature review of a limited number of genes, or biological field and will gain an insight into the application of ontologies.
GENEM006Understanding Bioinformatics Resources and Their Application (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesCompetency in genomic and proteomic resources is an essential skill for human disease genetic researchers. This module will enable students to experience first-hand how the annotation of the human genome is achieved and understand the uses and limitations of a wide range of freely available online resources. The course has four themes: (1) Online biological databases and their use for gene/SNP mapping, coding region identification, data extraction, including Ensembl, NCBIGene, UniProt, Biomart, OMIM, ChEBI, (2) Gene Ontology annotation and application, (3) Analysis of protein sequences and structure, including sequence alignment, structural and/or functional motif recognition, structure prediction, protein evolution, (4) Regulation of gene transcription, providing an introduction to this research area and the methods used to characterise proteins involved in gene regulation. Students will be required to undertake their own literature review of a limited number of genes, or biological field and will gain an insight into the application of ontologies.
PSYCGS01Understanding Individuals and GroupsPG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThis module reviews the current state of knowledge regarding themes and core processes involved in the construction of social reality. It examines how individuals make sense of self, others, and groups. Core processes include attention, encoding, memory organization and retrieval of social information; social categorization; activation and application of social knowledge; hypothesis testing; automatic and controlled processes in social cognition. These basic processes will be discussed in the context of central themes in social cognition, such as person identification, mind perception, trait inferences, expression recognition, stereotyping, and prejudice. Current controversies and debates on the social thinker will be discussed.
PSYCGC17Values, Policy, Culture and Diversity in Low Intensity CBT InterventionsPG30Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe course will focus on acquisition of knowledge, understanding and skills a) to work effectively with individuals from diverse backgrounds and to determine when and what kind of variations would be need in the delivery of low intensity interventions to respond to the diverse needs of their patients. They will gain a good understanding of equal opportunities as its applies to low intensity interventions
BIOLM018Vertebrate Life and Evolution (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will provide a broad review of vertebrate life and evolution from a variety of perspectives, including: the fossil record, modern evolutionary and functional anatomy, morphological and molecular evidence.
BIOLM018AVertebrate Life and Evolution (Masters Level) AUG.5Division of BiosciencesThe course will provide a broad review of vertebrate life and evolution from a variety of perspectives, including: the fossil record, modern evolutionary and functional anatomy, morphological and molecular evidence.
NEUR3045Visual NeuroscienceUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will teach visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. This half unit also makes up part of the full unit course NEUR3001 "Advanced Visual Neuroscience".
NEURG045Visual NeurosciencePG15Division of BiosciencesThis module will teach visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. This half unit also makes up part of the full unit Module NEUR3001/NEURG001 "Advanced Visual Neuroscience".
NEURM045Visual Neuroscience (Masters Level)UG.5Division of BiosciencesThis module will teach visual neuroscience from a broad, interdisciplinary point of view. Our modern understanding of vision and visual processing depends not only on the more traditional fields of anatomy, physiology and psychophysics, which remain centrally important, but also on the fields of genetics, molecular and cellular biology, ophthalmology, neurology, cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging. In this course, we will present visual neuroscience as a multidisciplinary, yet integrated field of study. This half unit also makes up part of the full unit course NEUR3001/NEURM001 "Advanced Visual Neuroscience".
PHAYG108VivaPG0School of Pharmacy
PALS3004Web Programming for Research in Psychology and Language ScienceUG.5Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe aim of the course is to develop knowledge and skills in the use of web technologies for running experiments in psychology and language sciences. The course will enable the student to build and style web pages, to exploit multimedia, to program interactive applications in JavaScript, to store and process subject responses data in a client-server environment, and to perform statistical and graphical analyses of experimental data.
PALSG308Web Programming for Research in Psychology and Language SciencePG15Division of Psychology and Language SciencesThe aim of the course is to develop knowledge and skills in the use of web technologies for running experiments in psychology and language sciences. The course will enable the student to build and style web pages, to exploit multimedia, to program interactive applications in JavaScript, to store and process subject responses data in a client-server environment, and to perform statistical and graphical analyses of experimental data.
BIOS2001Writing and Presenting BioscienceUG.5Division of BiosciencesThis is a half-unit course offering a library project in Biosciences to 2nd year students. The module will help students to write an advanced scientific essay. Students will be supervised by a member of staff from the Division of Biosciences and associated departments. The module aims to improve transferable skills (document preparation, formal writing and oral presentations). The module aims to prepare students for their higher-tariff project in the 3rd year and beyond, and then for the current labour market which prizes superlative communication skills.
BIOL3023Year Abroad Documentation and Self-EvaluationUG0Division of Biosciences
PLIN3607Year-Abroad ProjectUG1Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN3603Year-Abroad Self-Evaluation AUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
PLIN3604Year-Abroad Self-Evaluation BUG.5Division of Psychology and Language Sciences