Name
In Search of Shakespeare
Topic
Shakespeare, letter writing, article writing
Learning time
3 hours and 35 minutes
Designed learning time
3 hours and 35 minutes
Size of class
25
Description
This learning design is a scheme of lessons which revolves around the game 'In Search of Shakespeare'.
Aims
To revise students' knowledge of Shakespeare and the theatre. To revise letter and article writing.
Outcomes
Recall, Find out/discover, Apply, Compose, Give feedback, Reflect, Give feedback
Editor
WebofNotes
Introduction
5 minutes)
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    25
    1
    I introduce the students to the game, 'In Search of Shakespeare'. Expectations are established and outcomes are defined: - Why are we doing this? - What will be happening? (Plan/Timeframe.) - What are our learning outcomes? - etc.
Notes:
Resources linked: 0
Research
35 minutes)
  • Investigate
    20
    5
    2
    The students are presented with the first screen from the game (see attachment). Drawing on their prior knowledge, students work together in groups to note what they know about Shakespeare, the life of a playwright, the period, and the theatres at the time. Using the computers/tablets provided, the groups are then asked to investigate these topics further, and note any additional relevant information. The students are free to consult the timeline I made (see attachment). This research is to help the class revise what they know and research any aspects they are unsure about. I will act as a guide to groups during their research, encouraging their work and providing feedback/help.
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    5
    0
    Each group tells the class the main points of information they gathered.
  • Discuss
    10
    25
    0
    We briefly discuss the information each group has shared. Any further questions about the topics are answered.
Notes:
The information gathered during the collaboration and investigation will help students with the contents of the letters and articles they will compose.
Resources linked: 0
Writing the letter
45 minutes)
  • Practice
    15
    25
    1
    Each student is assigned the following task: "You are Shakespeare in 16th century London. Write a letter to the owner of the theatre in response to their advertised job, explaining why you are the best person for the position." I explain the task and answer any questions regarding it. Students are then asked to practice their first draft of the letter.
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    25
    0
    Before the peer assessment, I remind students what to look for in each other's letters and how to provide effective feedback. A rubric on what to look for in assessing the letter will be available to students.
  • Collaborate
    10
    25
    0
    Peer assessment: Students swap each other's letters and provide written feedback. Following this, each letter is given to another student who will act as a 'moderator', confirming that the feedback (etc.) is fair and amending as necessary. The letters are then returned.
  • Produce
    15
    25
    0
    Taking the feedback into account, students re-write their letters.
Notes:
The students are already familiar with letter writing.
Resources linked: 0
'In Search of Shakespeare'
25 minutes)
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    5
    0
    I explain to students how the 'In Search of Shakespeare' game works. I ask them to pay attention to the information which appears on each screen, and keep in mind how their choices at each stage can have different effects - including ending the game.
  • Collaborate
    20
    5
    1
    In their groups, students play the 'In Search of Shakespeare' game. They must read everything on each screen before discussing how to proceed at each step.
Notes:
The 'In Search of Shakespeare' game offers an insight into the life of a playwright at the time; their successes, problems they encounter, and their failures.
Resources linked: 0
Task discussion
15 minutes)
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    25
    0
    Students note the following task: "Imagine you are Shakespeare from the game 'In Search of Shakespeare'. Write an article about your life as a playwright." I explain the task to students in more detail (e.g. they should discuss both the good and difficult aspects of a playwright) and how I will assess it. I answer any questions regarding it.
  • Discuss
    10
    5
    0
    In their groups, students reflect on what they learned from the game and discuss ideas on how they will approach their own article.
Notes:
Resources linked: 0
Drafting the article
40 minutes)
  • Practice
    25
    25
    0
    Students write a draft of their article.
  • Read Watch Listen
    5
    25
    0
    Before the peer assessment, I remind students what to look for in each other's articles and how to provide effective feedback. A rubric on what to look for in assessing the article will be available to students.
  • Collaborate
    10
    25
    0
    Peer assessment: Students swap each other's drafts and provide written feedback. The article is given to another student who will act as a 'moderator'. The articles are then returned.
Notes:
Resources linked: 0
Finishing
50 minutes)
  • Produce
    30
    25
    0
    Taking the feedback into account, students re-write their letters.
  • Discuss
    10
    25
    0
    Students provide me with both their draft and finalised letters and articles. We discuss this scheme of lessons: what they learned, what they liked/disliked, what they found difficult, what suggestions they have that may improve the lesson or others like it, etc.
  • Read Watch Listen
    10
    25
    0
    Feedback on their letters and articles will be given in the lesson on the following day. Students read the feedback etc. they received, and we discuss further (group or one-to-one) as necessary.
Notes:
If we agree that any aspect of the learning outcomes (etc.) have not been fully achieved, the following scheme/lessons will incorporate it.
Resources linked: 0

Learning Experience

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