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Online Course | Privacy and Data: Law and Practice

01 February 2021–01 March 2021, 2:00 pm–5:30 pm

Privacy and data - telescope on abstract blue background

Running for it's 5th year, in 2021 this course will run online in weekly sessions with 5 modules of 3 hours each

Event Information

Open to

All

Organiser

UCL Laws Events

About this course

This CPD course is designed for qualified lawyers and those working with IP, in privacy, confidential information, data security and management, in the media, with public figures, and developing technologies.

Featuring a world class line up of speakers from the top of their fields including private practice, the bar, law enforcement, and the technology & cryptography sector.  The course will feature presentations from international cyber security experts, professionals working in data management for the state and for the private sector, the media, and experts in child protection.

Over five days, in three-hour modules, the participating speakers will discuss subjects including:

  • the sensitivities of managing data about patients’ and public health
  • current legal challenges to invasions of privacy
  • the protection of reputation in the internet age
  • the public interest vs what interests the public
  • data collection, data transfers, its governance and current legal challenges to the dominance of the data giants
  • the ethics of neural interface technology
  • employees’ rights when working independently & being monitored
  • cryptography
  • protection of company secrets
  • surveillance, security and international crime prevention
  • online protection of the vulnerable  
  • tensions between legal privilege and the investigation of financial crime

What has previously been said about the course: 
“an excellent, if not terrifying, overview”; “startling”;  ”gripping”; “brilliant, very information intense, but wonderfully conveyed”; “the right mixture of factual information and philosophical debate, “the  course actually turned out to be different from what I expected - but in a more stimulating way”; “the best course I have ever attended”.

The Schedule - 14:00 - 17:30

1st February 2021 - Module One: Privacy in Public
Introduction: Amanda Harcourt, Course Convenor, Visiting Professor, IBIL, UCL, Principal of Independent Copyright Consultancy.

  1. Privacy, Publicity and the Public Interest
    Speaker: Andrew Lee, Partner, Brandsmiths
  2. Privacy International: Current law and current PI Cases
    Speaker: Caroline Wilson-Palow, General Counsel Privacy International 
  3. Online Protection of Children
    Speaker: The Baroness Beeban Kidron, Founder and Chair of 5Rights

8th February 2021 - Module Two: Privacy and Data Usage
Introduction: Amanda Harcourt, Course Convenor, Visiting Professor, IBIL, UCL, Principal of Independent Copyright Consultancy.

  1. An Update: General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and Brexit
    Speaker:  Jacob O’Brien, Senior Associate, Brandsmiths
  2. Privacy, Employment and Remote Working
    Speaker: Olivia Sinfield, Associate Director, Osborne Clarke
  3. International Data Transfer: post Brexit, post EU-US Privacy Shield
    Speaker: Oliver Patel, Research Associate and Policy Manager of the UCL European Institute

15th February 2021 - Module Three: Privacy, Security and Secrets
Introduction: Amanda Harcourt, Course Convenor, Visiting Professor, IBIL, UCL, Principal of Independent Copyright Consultancy.

  1. Privacy, Client Confidentiality/Privilege and White Collar Crime
    Speakers: John Binns and Julian Hayes, Partners, BCL Solicitors
  2. Privacy and Data Security in International Law Enforcement
    Speaker: Dietrich Neumann, Head of Business of Corporate Services, EUROPOL
  3. Proprietary Information and the Protection of Corporate Secrets
    Speaker: Adrian Eissa QC, 25 Bedford Row

22nd February 2021 - Module Four: Privacy and Health Data
Introduction: Amanda Harcourt, Course Convenor, Visiting Professor, IBIL, UCL, Principal of Independent Copyright Consultancy.

  1. Management of Medical Data and Patient Rights
    Speaker:  Dr Nathan Lea, Information Governance Manager for Research, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust; and Senior Research Associate, Clinical Epidemiology, Institute for Health Informatics, UCL and Matthew Hall, Head of Information Governance and Data Protection Officer, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust.
  2. Privacy, Data and Epidemiology
    Speaker: Dr Michael Veale, Lecturer in Digital Rights & Regulation, Faculty of Laws, University College London
  3. The Ethics of Neural Implants and Human Integrity
    Speaker: Dr Sarah Chan, Chancellor’s Fellow, Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, co-author of 2019 Royal Society Report “Mind and Machine”

1st March 2021 - Module Five: The Future Perfect?  Privacy, Data & the Citizen
Introduction: Amanda Harcourt, Course Convenor, Visiting Professor, IBIL, UCL, Principal of Independent Copyright Consultancy.

  1. Encryption, Politics and the Law
    Speaker: John Mitchell, Interaction Law. Washington D.C.
  2. Has Technology Invaded Our Most Private Thoughts?
    Speaker: Susie Alegre, Barrister, Doughty Street Chambers
  3. Surveillance and the Modern Economy
    Speaker: Professor Lorna Woods OBE, University of Essex
About the teachers

SESSION 1:

Privacy, Publicity and the Public Interest
Speaker: Andrew Lee, Partner, Brandsmiths

Andrew Lee is an experienced litigator with boutique firm Brandsmiths which specialise in intellectual property, sport and media law. Brandsmiths act for well-known brands such as Microsoft, BMW, Rolls Royce, Missguided, Speedo and Umbro and for high profile individuals including Gordon Ramsay, Mo Farah, David Haye and others in the public eye.   Andrew has extensive experience in advising clients in respect of the protection of their reputations and the protection of confidential and private information. This includes obtaining pre-publication undertakings and/or injunctions against the press, and helping clients in difficult personal situations where there is a threat by others to disclose private information. He has particular experience of dealing with problems arising on the internet such as individuals (often anonymously) posting defamatory allegations or undertaking campaigns of harassment, identifying those individuals and obtaining relief for clients.   He recently acted for the former Brazilian footballer Roberto Carlos in a libel claim against the Daily Mail.

Privacy International: Current Cases
Speaker: Caroline Wlson-Palow, General Counsel Privacy International  

Caroline Wilson Palow is Privacy International’s General Counsel. Caroline leads the legal team and counsels Privacy International’s programmes on legal strategy and risk. Caroline is a US-qualified lawyer who previously specialized in privacy and intellectual property litigation at a prominent US law firm. She received her law degree from Yale Law School and her undergraduate degree in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley.  After law school, Caroline clerked for Judge Warren J. Ferguson of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Online Protection of Children
Speaker: Baroness Beeban Kidron, OBE, Film director, House of Lords Peer and Founder of 5Rights Foundation

Baroness Beeban Kidron is a British filmmaker who successfully navigates between pop culture and society’s darkest underworlds. Kidron is best known for directing Bridget Jones: Edge of Reason (2004) and the Bafta-winning miniseries Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1989), adapted from Jeannette Winterson’s novel of the same name. She is also the director of To Wong Foo Thanks For Everything, Julie Newmar (1991), as well as two documentaries on prostitution: Hookers, Hustlers, Pimps and their Johns (1993) and Sex, Death and the Gods (2011), a film about “devadasi,” or Indian “sacred prostitutes.” 

Baroness Kidron is the Founder and Chair of 5Rights Foundation, a charity that works to create policy and practical solutions to build the digital world children and young people deserve. The charity advocates for enforceable regulation and international agreements that allow children and young people to thrive online. It has developed technical standards and protocols with engineers and colleagues around the world to help businesses reshape and redesign their digital services with children and young people in mind. Baroness Kidron is a Crossbench member of the House of Lords and sat on the Communications Committee and the Democracy and Digital Technologies Committee. She is a Commissioner for UNESCO's Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development where she is a member of the Working Group on Child Online Safety; a member of UNICEF's AI and Child Rights Policy Guidance Group; and sits on the Council on Extended Intelligence. She is also an advisor to Duncan McCann in his court case against Google, for misusing children’s data.

SESSION 2:

An Update: General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and Brexit
Speaker:  Jacob O’Brien, Senior Associate, Brandsmiths

Jacob O’Brien is a solicitor with boutique law firm Brandsmiths, which specialises in intellectual property, sport and media law. Brandsmiths acts for well-known brands such as Microsoft, BMW, Rolls Royce, Missguided, Speedo and Umbro, as well as for high profile individuals including Gordon Ramsay, Mo Farah and David Haye.  Jacob has extensive experience advising clients in respect of their data protection obligations. As General Counsel of Missguided in 2018, Jacob worked with internal stakeholders in the build-up to the introduction of GDPR to ensure the business’s compliance with its obligations. Outside of Missguided, Jacob works with clients to manage and implement data protection processes, as well as assisting with ICO investigations and complaints.

Privacy, Employment and Remote Working
Speaker: Olivia Sinfield, Associate Director, Osborne Clarke

Olivia Sinfield first joined Osborne Clarke from another international law firm in the 1990s.  She has more than twelve years’ experience specifically advising employers and senior executives in the full range of contentious and non- contentious issues arising during the employment life cycle.  After 7 years in a niche employment practice in London, Olivia a re-joined the Osborne Clark London employment team in 2016   This has given her a valuable additional perspective having advised both employers and employees.   She has extensive experience in advocacy in the Employment Tribunal having represented Respondents and Claimants at preliminary and full hearings. She has also participated in the Judicial Shadowing Scheme.  Olivia is experienced in dealing with a wide range of employment issues but has particular experience in:
• Employment Tribunal litigation including bonus claims • Restrictive covenants and injunctions;
• Restructuring and collective redundancies • Business critical issues including board disputes, change management and discrimination claims.  
The challenges of employment brought about by the coronavirus mean Olivia’s has a valuable perspective on employees’ privacy rights and adjustments to working circumstances that are required to be implemented by employers.

International Data Transfer: the current position
Speaker: Oliver Patel, Policy Manager of the UCL European Institute

Oliver Patel is a Research Associate and Policy Manager at the UCL European Institute. He publishes widely on a range of digital law and policy areas, including data protection, cross-border data flows, digital trade, and Brexit. He has co-authored two relevant reports, on Brexit and data transfers and EU-US Privacy Shield respectively, and the work has been featured in BBC News, The Guardian, Financial Times and WIRED. In a past life, Oliver has worked in digital policy at the think tank Nesta and in the House of Commons.

SESSION 3:

Privacy, Client Confidentiality/Privilege and White Collar Crime
Speakers: John Binns and Julian Hayes, Partners, BCL Solicitors

John Binns completed an MPhil in Criminology at Cambridge after obtaining his LLB at Kings College London. The very early part of his career was spent in the Legal Services Commission, later joining a leading criminal/regulatory defence firm of solicitors.  His work at BCL has included representing suspects, defendants and witnesses in cases invoking allegations of bribery and corruption, fraud (including carbon credits, carousel/MTIC, land-banking, Ponzi and pyramid scheme frauds), insider trading, market abuse, price-fixing, sanctions-busting, and tax evasion. He has coordinated and undertaken corporate investigations and defended in cases brought by BEIS, the FCA, HMRC, NCA, OFT, SFO and others.  He has particular expertise in the myriad legal provisions on anti-money laundering (“AML”) requirements in the regulated sector under the Money Laundering Regulations (“MLR”), civil recovery and confiscation of the proceeds of crime, and criminal offences of money laundering under POCA, as well as related areas such as financial sanctions. With a respected practice internationally, John has represented individuals in challenges to the European Court of Justice against their inclusion on targeted sanctions lists arising from the Arab Spring, and advised on numerous Interpol Red Notices and extradition requests.  He has a particular expertise in challenging allegations made by overseas authorities on the basis of political motivation.

Julian Hayes completed post-graduate legal studies in Newcastle, and trained as a barrister at a leading criminal/regulatory chambers following an undergraduate degree at the University of Kent.  He then worked as a regulator at the London Stock Exchange before moving to Australia where he spent several years undertaking high profile litigation at an international law firm.  Julian specialises in financial crime, cybercrime, surveillance and data protection law.  He advises individuals and corporates in relation to fraud and corruption investigations by the SFO, enforcement actions by the FCA (insider dealing and market abuse) and offences under the customs and excise legislation prosecuted by HMRC. As well as expertise in relation to computer misuse offences, Julian also advises on the provisions of the Data Protection Act 2018 and the GDPR (including breach reporting), and provides advice to Communication Service Providers with regard to their obligations under the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 and its associated Codes of Conduct.  Julian works on internal investigations, extradition (including Interpol Red Notices), ancillary matters such as judicial review, restraint and confiscation, mutual legal assistance, Norwich Pharmacal applications in the High Court and defending complaints against corporates for breaches of the OECD’s Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises

Privacy and Data Security in International Law Enforcement
Speaker: Dietrich Neumann, Head of Business of Corporate Services, EUROPOL

Dietrich Neumann is responsible for EUROPOL’s external relations and legal affairs unit. Before starting his job as EUROPOL’s in-house counsel in 2004, he held positions at the German Federal Ministry of the Interior, the General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union and the German Federal Investigation Office. He studied law at the University of Passau and the University of Erlangen, and has an LLM in EU and International Public Law from the Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Proprietary Information and Corporate Secrets
Speaker: Adrian Eissa QC, 25 Bedford Row

Adrian Eissa QC was called to the Bar in 1988 and took silk in 2018.   He advises and represents companies and individuals in a broad range of criminal and regulatory investigations and proceedings. These include, but are not limited to, the following areas: complex fraud, money laundering, insider trading, bribery, civil and criminal confiscation and restraint proceedings, Health and Safety , large scale drug conspiracies , sexual offences, and private prosecutions.  He was appointed Recorder of the Crown Court in 2012.  He is the winner of multiple legal awards for white collar crime and money-laundering work and is ranked as a Leading Tier 1 Silk in Crime, Fraud and Proceeds of Crime and Asset Forfeiture. He regularly lectures and publishes on money laundering, guidance for fraud practitioners and is recommended as a Leading Silk in Crime in Chambers & Partner.

SESSION 4:

Management of Health Data and Patient Rights
Speakers: Dr Nathan Lea, Information Governance Lead for the UCLH Biomedical Research Centre Clinical and Informatics Unit  AND Matthew Hall, Head of Information Governance and Data Protection Officer, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust

Dr Nathan Lea is the Information Governance Lead for the UCLH Biomedical Research Centre Clinical and Informatics Unit and works with UCLH NHS Foundation Trust Information Governance focusing on research and health data reuse. He is a Senior Research Fellow at UCL where his research focuses on the role Information Governance and wider regulatory oversight in the use of genetic, health and social care records in clinical research, particularly with the advent of omics, machine learning and artificial intelligence to drive innovation and improve care.  His work includes understanding of the role of the General Data Protection Regulation and Clinical Trials Regulation to enable safer, more robust and effective software and interventions.  Nathan entered the area of Health Informatics as a software engineer where he co-developed and deployed clinical information systems used at Whittington Health for Cardiovascular care and Dementia registries in partnership with the West London Mental Health Trust and UCL’s Dementia Research Centre. He sits on the UCL GDPR Preparedness Board, Consultative Committee and Security Working Group and has worked with the UCL European Institute on understanding the implications of Brexit and Transatlantic data flows. Nathan works internationally as the Information Governance and GDPR Taskforce Lead at the European Institute for Innovation through Health Data (i~HD) working on several large consortium projects including EU-PEARL and FAIRVASC. He is a member of the European Health Data Evidence Network (EHDEN) Ethical Advisory Board.

Privacy, Data and Epidemiology
Speaker: Dr Michael Veale, Lecturer in Digital Rights & Regulation, Faculty of Laws, University College London

Dr Michael Veale joined the Faculty of Laws as Lecturer in Digital Rights and Regulation in 2019. His expertise sits at the cross over of computer science and technology law, particularly in the context of fundamental rights and advanced data analysis including machine learning and artificial intelligence. Dr Veale holds a PhD in the application of law and policy to the social challenges of machine learning from UCL STEaPP and UCL Computer Science. He previously worked at the European Commission and holds degrees from Maastricht University and the London School of Economics.  He has authored and co-authored reports for a range of organisations, including the Law Society of England and Wales on Algorithms in the Justice System, the Royal Society and British Academy on the future of data governance, the United Nations on AI and public services, and the Commonwealth Secretariat on electoral cybersecurity. He has worked with a range of government departments and regulators in various capacities around issues of emerging technologies, law and society, including in the UK and the Netherlands.  In 2019¬-2020 Dr Veale is also Digital Charter Fellow between the Alan Turing Institute, the UK’s National Centre for AI and Data Science, and the Department for Digital, Culture,  Media and Sport. He co-organises the ACM FAT* Conference on Fairness, Accountability and Transparency in Computing Systems and is General Chair of Hot Topics in Privacy Enhancing Technologies (HotPETS) 2020-21. Dr Veale is a member of the Advisory Councils of the Open Rights Group and of Foxglove, and a research affiliate of the PILOT Lab at Penn State University.

Neural Implants and Human Integrity
Speaker: Dr Sarah Chan, Chancellor’s Fellow, Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, co-author of 2019 Royal Society Report “Mind and Machine”

Dr Sarah Chan is a co-author of the independent Royal Society report published in September 2019.  iHuman: Blurring the Lines between Mind and Machine which examined the impact of emerging neural interface technologies.  Heralded by The Lancet for recognising the “potential ethical, socio-political, and commercial concerns that might be introduced”, The Report expressly sets out recommendations to address the ethical risks of machines implanted in or on the body.  Dr Chan is a Chancellor’s Fellow at the Usher Institute for Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh. She graduated from the University of Melbourne with the degrees of LLB and BSc(Hons) and spent some years as a laboratory scientist in the field of molecular biology before moving to work in science policy and bioethics. She received an MA in Health Care Ethics and Law and a PhD in Bioethics from the University of Manchester, where she was a Research Fellow in Bioethics from 2005 to 2015, first at the Centre for Social Ethics and Policy and from 2008 the Institute for Science Ethics and Innovation, where she was Deputy Director. Sarah joined the University of Edinburgh in August 2015. Her research interests and publications cover areas including the ethics of stem cell and embryo research and reproductive medicine, gene therapy and genetic modification, human enhancement, animal ethics and research ethics.

SESSION 5:

Encryption, Politics and the Law
Speaker: John Mitchell, Interaction Law, Washington DC

John Mitchell is a United Sates attorney based in Washington, DC. For over 30 years, his work has focused on freedom of speech (fighting government efforts to censor music and movies), intellectual property (primarily relating to copyright infringement and exhaustion of the distribution right), antitrust law (with a focus on advising trade associations representing retailers of copyrighted works) and privacy law (with particular emphasis on the U.S. Video Privacy Protection Act, which he helped draft). He has advised clients responding to government efforts to obtain information protected by privacy law, including an effort by the F.B.I. to persuade his client to violate privacy law, and won an important privacy and civil rights case holding that Oklahoma City police officers violated the Video Privacy Protection Act when demanding that video stores give them the names and addresses of customers who had rented the Academy-Award-Winning German film, The Tin Drum, based on unfounded allegations of child pornography. In the music industry, he successfully opposed record company efforts to require that music retailers pass on their digital customers’ contact information. His litigation practice includes the Supreme Court of the United States, where he was instrumental in clarifying the U.S. “first sale doctrine” to the benefit of importers and their customers.

Has Technology Invaded Our Most Private Thoughts?
Speaker:  Susie Alegre, Doughty Street Chambers

Susie Alegre is an international human rights lawyer with over 20 years’ experience.  She has worked on some of the most challenging legal and political issues of our time including human rights and security, combating corruption in the developing world, protecting human rights at borders, the human rights impacts of climate change and the impact of Brexit on individual rights and security. She has particular expertise in human rights and ethics in the field of technology and AI; and the protection of human rights in the small island context.  Her clients, include governments, international organisations, NGO’s, think-tanks, academic institutions and private companies who have instructed her for expert advice and analysis.  This has included areas such as the protection of the rights to freedom of thought and opinion in the digital age; the drafting of parliamentary submissions and responses to public consultations; advocacy strategies and opportunities for stakeholder engagement; assistance with navigating international institutions, public policy development and public campaigns.  Susie is currently Interception of Communications Commissioner for the Isle of Man. Her annual reports include recommendations and guidance on legislative and practical reforms for human rights compliance and effective oversight. In the UK, she advised the Equality and Human Rights Commission on human rights law and was also an ombudsman for the Financial Ombudsman Service where she advised on the development of policy and structures to ensure the effective application of the Equality Act in casework as well as providing training on judicial independence. In the international development context, Susie advised the EU on accountability and combating corruption in Uganda from 2010-2013. She provided leadership advising the international donor community on responses to corruption Co-Chairing the Donor Accountability Working Group. She has also worked with civil society and human rights defenders on engagement with domestic and international bodies for accountability in human rights and represented Amnesty International through its EU Office over the development of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency.

Surveillance and the Modern Economy
Speaker: Professor Lorna Woods OBE, University of Essex

Professor Lorna Woods OBE is Professor of Internet Law, with a long-standing interest in privacy and the law relating to surveillance.. She started her career as a practising solicitor in a technology, media and telecommunications practice in the City of London. She has extensive experience in the field of media policy and communications regulation, including data protection, social media and the Internet, and has published widely in this area. She has contributed to a range of commissioned studies, including the RAND Study on Options for and Effectiveness of Internet Self- and Co-Regulation’ (2007)) and the Hans Bredow Study on Co-regulation and the Media.

She has been invited to give oral evidence to a number of parliamentary committees in respect of inquiries across the TMT field, including House of Lords Communications Committee on Regulation of the Internet; the House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee on security cooperation and data protection post Brexit; and the International Grand Committee on Disinformation and Fake News. Her current research project with William Perrin of the Carnegie UK Trust is on reducing harm arising on social media.  Lorna is a Senior Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and was awarded an OBE in recognition of her work in the Queen’s Birthday Honours of 2020.

 

Course Delivery

This course will be delivered on Zoom. You will be sent details of each meeting link, id and password on the Friday before each session (with reminders on the day of the module).

Fees and Booking

FULL COURSE:
Standard ticket = £600 (groups of 3 or more = £500)
UCL Alumni = £500
Government Legal = £350
Full time Academics = £200
Non-UCL Students = £100

SINGLE MODULE:
Standard ticket = £140
UCL Alumni = £110
Government Legal = £80
Full time Academics = £60

BOOK ONLINE AT:
https://ucl-2020-privacy-and-data-law.eventbrite.co.uk

UCL Students should register their interest in a free place on this course here

Queries

If you have any queries about this course please contact Lisa Penfold (CPD Manager, UCL Laws) by emailing lisa.penfold@ucl.ac.uk