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Choosing a project: listed research projects

This list of projects is for Summer 2023

UCL Projects

The listed projects usually form part of a larger research project supervisors are running at UCL, working at the forefront of their disciplines to push forward the boundaries of knowledge. 

Applicants from UCL can apply for any project which interests them from this list.  It does not have to relate to your current studies.  The projects listed are partly formulated.  If you are successful in your application, you will be expected to work with your Laidlaw supervisor to produce a full project plan before you start work in Summer 2023.

You will need to demonstrate in your application that you meet the Essential Criteria listed for each project.

When you have chosen which project you wish to apply for, make sure you read it thoroughly and think about the issues involved.  This will help you to complete your application.

Essentials for your application

  • You must demonstrate how you meet the Essential Skills listed in the project description when you complete your application form. 
  • Your application must be submitted by the deadline. Late submission for whatever reason cannot be accepted - so we recommend you apply in plenty of time.

See Applying for more information.

Notes:

(1) The standard six week period for summer 2023 is Monday 12 June to Friday 21 July 2023.  These dates can usually be changed by agreement with the supervisor, but you should check this with them before applying.

(2) Project outputs must be completed by the end of the summer 2023.  Failure to do so could jeopardise your place on the scheme.

Project List: Summer 2023

This list is for first year undergraduates at UCL applying for the Laidlaw Scholarship.

Projects Listed by Faculty

You can apply for any topic that interests you regardless of your degree subject, but you must meet the Essential Criteria.

Arts and Humanities
1 The transmission of early Latin tragic fragments
2 Case study of British or Global Yiddish Theatre

Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment
3 Stepping into a Future Urban Growth Lab

Brain Sciences
4 How does voice training affect speech perception?
5 The side effects of clozapine (an atypical antipsychotic) in treating psychosis in Parkinson's disease
6 How does the antibiotic doxycycline promote survival in mitochondrial disease models?

Engineering Sciences
7 (m)App my data!   Exploring the power of location as a data integrator for Net Zero Digital Twins
8 Augmented Reality User Interface
9 A bio-impedance analysis-based HMI system for robotic control
10 Single antenna FMCW radar using UCL's ARESTOR system
11 Internet of Things (IoT) direction of arrival (DoA) system based on Xilinx RFSoC
12 Exploring the landscape of mutations in Gaucher disease

Institute of Education
13 Sound Spikes: Designing, constructing and evaluating musical interfaces using Lego, Spike Sensors and Raspberry PI computers
14 Youth voice and sustainable futures for higher education
15 Marking two hundred years of students at UCL

Laws
16 A critical perspective on English contract law

Life Sciences
17 Cellular ‘self-eating’ and calcium: what’s the link?
18 Career trajectory and success of neurosurgeons
19 Career trajectory and success of psychiatrists

Mathematical and Physical Sciences
20 Nature-inspired self-healing for organic electronics
21 Low temperature deposition of indium oxide thin films for applications in optoelectronic devices

Medical Sciences
22 Sport, exercise and physical activity: improving menstrual health experiences

Social and Historical Sciences
23 Emotions in learning and assessment
24 Climate Change and Investment Protection
25 Foreign language education reforms in Europe
26 History and the Rustat memorial plaque controversy
27 ACT UP New York and the Politics of Health Care in the HIV-AIDS Emergency

Arts and Humanities Faculty

Project Number: 1


The transmission of early Latin tragic fragments

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Gesine Manuwald
Department of Supervisor: Greek and Latin
Faculty of Supervisor: Arts and Humanities
Email address of Supervisor: g.manuwald@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Edition of early Latin dramatic fragments
Brief summary of main research project: The overarching research projects consists of a new edition of all early Latin tragic fragments in a critical edition, including information on their transmission and the history of scholarship.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The transmission of early Latin tragic fragments
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: For this project the scholar will study the transmission of early texts surviving in fragments, find out how information about these texts can be recovered and how this can best be presented. The scholar will look at different existing editions of these texts, compile information from them and evaluate it for the use of future editions.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: Poster illustrating the transmission of short pieces of Latin texts surviving via secondary transmission  short blog post for departmental website on the editing process of Latin text, to inform prospective students and the general public  contribution to new critical edition
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Knowledge of Latin at least to A-Level standard
  • Basic familiarity with using editions of texts in languages other than English
  • Basic familiarity with standard text-editing software packages

Details of Supervision arrangements: several formal meetings (in person or online); regular email exchange throughout the project period 


Project Number: 2


Case study of British or Global Yiddish Theatre

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Sonia Gollance
Department of Supervisor: Hebrew and Jewish Studies
Faculty of Supervisor: Arts and Humanities
Email address of Supervisor: s.gollance@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Digital Yiddish Theatre Project
Brief summary of main research project: The Digital Yiddish Theatre Project [DYTP] uses digital technology to study and preserve the rich legacy of the Yiddish stage. Founded in 2012, the DYTP comprises an international team of theatrical practitioners, research librarians, and scholars in higher education, who are among the world's leading authorities on Yiddish theatre and drama. Our projects to date are:

  • The DYTP Blog: featuring new scholarship on Yiddish drama and performance. Blog posts cover a wide range of topics and come in many formats, including reviews, interviews, biographical sketches, translations and long-form journalism.
  • Plotting Yiddish Drama [PYD]: a searchable database of English-language plot synopses of Yiddish plays.
  • The Encyclopedia of the Yiddish Theatre, volume 7: a digital publication, with supporting metadata, of the previously unpublished last volume of Zalmen Zylbercweig’s magisterial reference work.

Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Case study of British or Global Yiddish Theatre
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: With advice of a supervisor the scholar will identify one or more topics in Yiddish theatre to investigate in greater depth in order to prepare short, public scholarly pieces for the DYTP blog that would be appropriate for an educated general reader but adhere to academic standards. The topics will depend upon the interests and expertise of the scholar, but will hopefully diversify the blog contributions by including topics such as the London Yiddish stage or Yiddish theatre outside of global centres such as New York, Warsaw and Buenos Aires. For instance, what was written about Yiddish theatre in English-language London newspapers during a particular time period? What sort of Yiddish theatre (poster) collection exists at UCL, in the British Library, the Wiener Holocaust Library, or another archival collection? In addition to historical studies, blog post formats can include performance reviews, translations and interviews with Yiddish theatre professionals. If the scholar has sufficient Yiddish proficiency, they might choose to write play synopses for the Plotting Yiddish Drama database instead of or in addition to blog posts, and receive supervisor support in selected play(s) to read and summarize. The scholar will learn about the workings of a Digital Humanities project, receive feedback on writing for a general audience and participate in the rejuvenation of the project website, providing vital help at a time of transition for our 8-year-old blog. In doing so, the scholar would be able to get oriented in the Digital Humanities world, which plays an increasingly significant role in scholarly work as well as teaching.
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • One or more short public scholarship pieces for the DYTP blog
  • Potential assistance in migration of webpages to WordPress
  • Potential contribution of one or more synopses to Plotting Yiddish Drama database
  • A presentation poster and short report.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Interest in Yiddish, Jewish history, theatre, and/or Digital Humanities 
  • Organisation and self-direction

Details of Supervision arrangements: Scholar will meet with supervisor (or another representative from the project team) at the start, middle and end of each period of project work and as mutually agreed upon through the project period. 

Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment
Project Number: 3


Stepping into a Future Urban Growth Lab

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Tommaso Gabrieli
Department of Supervisor: Planning
Faculty of Supervisor: Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment
Email address of Supervisor: t.gabrieli@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Future Urban Growth Lab
Brief summary of main research project: UCL Knowledge Exchange and Innovation Funding (KEIF) is a scheme supporting projects that connect UCL researchers with communities beyond the university to exchange ideas, evidence and expertise. In the KEIF project Future Urban Growth Lab, a team from the Bartlett School of Planning (Dr. Tommaso Gabrieli PI and Prof. Stephen Marshall Co-I) formed a partnership with the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and Dr. Luca D’Acci (Associate Professor in Urban Studies at Politecnico of Turin, Italy) with the objective to operationalise an urban growth model prototype (D'Acci L. 2019 New type of cities for liveable futures. Isobenefit Urbanism morphogenesis. Journal of Environmental Management) and trialling it in a way that is of use to local authorities in envisaging options for future city growth. The urban morphogenesis model to be operationalized  would enhance the understanding of how to achieve sustainable and desirable attributes of cities, such as increase the daily contacts of citizens or reduce their commuting and related emissions and car dependency, given existing market dynamics and policy constraints.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Stepping into a Future Urban Growth Lab
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The scholar will work under the supervision of Dr. Tommaso Gabrieli, and will develop a simple software-code that is able to visualize evolutionary rules and scenarios regarding morphological urban planning.
The software to be developed by the researcher will be based on previous work by Dr. Luca D’Acci and Dr. Michele Voto (https://lucadacci.wixsite.com/dacci/isobenefit-urbanism-morphogenesis https://github.com/mitochevole/isobenefit-cities), with further inputs obtained from local authority stakeholders through the Future Urban Growth Lab project, and written in Python or Net Logo programming language.
It is expected that the software will model and visualize different morphological scenarios and evolutionary rules with real-case applications on UK towns.
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • A simplified version of the existing Iso-Benefit software developed in the Future Urban Growth Lab.
  • An application of the software code to a UK town, in order to visualize different morphological scenarios and evolutionary rules
  • A short paper making recommendations for local authority planners of that UK town, on the basis of the evolutionary rules identified by the software.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Some experience of coding in Python or in NetLogo    
  • Some experience with spatial model and spatial codes    
  • A keen interest in urban spatial models and morphological models

Details of Supervision arrangements: One weekly 2 hours meeting, a final presentation to the Urban Growth Lab group at the end of the project. 


Faculty of Brain Sciences

Project Number: 4


How does voice training affect speech perception?

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Emma Holmes
Department of Supervisor: Psychology and Language Sciences
Faculty of Supervisor: Brain Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: emma.holmes@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): How does voice training affect speech perception?
Brief summary of main research project: In busy cafés or loud restaurants, we often face the challenge of understanding someone speaking when other conversations are going on around us. Previous research demonstrates that, in these situations, we are better at understanding speech that’s spoken by familiar people (e.g., a close friend or partner) than by unfamiliar people (e.g., a stranger). In addition, we can mimic this process in the lab by familiarising people with new voices and training them so the new voices become familiar. Interestingly, training new voices to become familiar in the lab can lead to a benefit to speech understanding that is as large as when we hear naturally familiar voices (e.g., a close friend or partner). This project aims to improve knowledge about how voice training benefits speech perception. On a day-to-day basis, this project might involve making recordings of speech, editing these recordings, and collecting new data from human participants in the lab or online.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: How does voice training affect speech perception?
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The following are examples of research questions that the scholar might work on:

  • Do the effects of voice training differ between older and younger people, or between people with and without hearing loss?
  • How sensitive are newly-learned voices to subtle changes applied to the voice?
  • How does the variability of voice attributes during training affect how well voices are learnt?
  • What are the optimal parameters for voice training?

Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • Results of an experiment on voice training
  • A poster summarising the project
  • A short report

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes, although there may be some flexibility if required by the scholar
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 
•    High level of written and verbal fluency in English
Details of Supervision arrangements: Regular meetings with the project supervisor 


Project Number: 5


The side effects of clozapine (an atypical antipsychotic) in treating psychosis in Parkinson's disease

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Jonathan Rogers
Department of Supervisor: Division of Psychiatry
Faculty of Supervisor: Brain Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: jonathan.rogers@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Neuropsychiatry of Movement
Brief summary of main research project: We are interested in the relationship between psychiatric disorders and movement disorders. There are two aspects to this. Firstly, there are the psychiatric features of classic neurological movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease or Huntington's disease. Secondly, there are motor abnormalities that are intrinsic to psychiatric disorders, such as catatonia, neurological soft signs and psychomotor retardation.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The side effects of clozapine (an atypical antipsychotic) in treating psychosis in Parkinson's disease
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Parkinson's disease is primarily considered as a movement disorder, but psychosis (hallucinations and/or delusions) is a common feature. The most effective treatment for the psychosis is an antipsychotic medication known as clozapine. Unfortunately, clozapine - when used at high doses for schizophrenia - has a range of dangerous side effects, which limit its use. What is not clear is whether - when clozapine is used at much lower doses in Parkinson's disease - it has the same profile of side effects. This project would aim to examine the literature on clozapine use in Parkinson's disease to try to answer this question. However, there would be some flexibility in the project around the theme above.
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • Poster and short report
  • Literature review
  • Potential to be part of a peer-reviewed publication, as the work is developed

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? 13 June - 22 July
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • High level of written fluency in English
  • Background in science or medicine

Details of Supervision arrangements: Weekly supervision either in-person or remote 


Project Number: 6


How does the antibiotic doxycycline promote survival in mitochondrial disease models?

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Jan-Willem Taanman
Department of Supervisor: Neurology
Faculty of Supervisor: Brain Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: j.taanman@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Development of novel treatments for mitochondrial diseases
Brief summary of main research project: Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles in the cell. They are derived from alpha-proteobacteria. Mitochondria still contain their own DNA and transcription/translation machinery. Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell, generating the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP. The mitochondrial DNA codes for subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation enzyme complexes that produce ATP. Mutations that impair mitochondrial function are a common cause of disease. Because of the evolutionary origin of mitochondria, the antibiotic doxycycline that inhibits bacterial protein synthesis also inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis. Remarkably, it has been reported that doxycycline increases the survival in mitochondrial disease models but the mechanism has remained elusive. Some exciting new findings in our laboratory may offer an explanation for the increased survival. In this project, our hypothesis will be further tested in a series of experiments with cell cultures derived from patients with mitochondrial disorders and cell culture models.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: How does the antibiotic doxycycline promote survival in mitochondrial disease models?
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project:

  1. What are the effects of doxycycline on mitochondrially encoded protein levels?
  2. What are the effects of doxycycline on the levels of the oxidative phosphorylation enzyme complexes?
  3. What is the effect of doxycycline on the activity of the oxidative phosphorylation enzyme complexes?
  4. Are cells from patients with a mitochondrial translation deficiency affected in a similar manner as doxycycline-treated cells?
  5. Can our results explain why doxycycline promotes survival in mitochondrial disease models?

Outputs expected by the Scholar: This is a lab-based research project. The scholar is expected to conduct a series of biochemical experiments under direct supervision of a graduate research student. The outputs include:

  • results from the experiments
  • statistical analyses of the results
  • a brief report of the research project in the form of a research paper, and
  • an A0 poster.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Standard six-week period is fine but flexible.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Basic understanding of biochemistry
  • Analytical thinking
  • Enthusiasm for medical research

Details of Supervision arrangements: Day-to-day supervision of the scholar in the lab will be by an experienced graduate student. There will also be weekly meetings between the project supervisor and the research team. In addition, there will be one-to-one meetings between the scholar and the project supervisor at the start, middle and end of the project work, and whenever felt necessary. 


Faculty of Engineering Sciences

Project Number: 7


(m)App my data!   Exploring the power of location as a data integrator for Net Zero Digital Twins

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Claire Ellul
Department of Supervisor: CEGE
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: c.ellul@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Location-Enabled Digital Twins
Brief summary of main research project: Digital Twins (DT) are digital models of the physical world, different from standard models in that they link from physical to digital and back again.  An example of this is a Google Map with driving instructions - the physical (phone) tracks the driver's location, passes this to the digital model which calculates the route and then this goes back to the physical world - the driver/car follows the route. DT support applications including climate change and resilience modelling, improving retail experience, transport modelling and much more, and are fundamental to achiving Net Zero targets.    As DT arose from manufacturing, location science - knowing where and when things happen and how they relate to the things around them - is not explicitly articulated in DT, although location (mappable) data and techniques are often included.      

Working with National Mapping Agencies around Europe (e.g. Ordnance Survey) our research aims to understand and make explicit the importance of location science in a DT context, starting with defining a location-enabled DT and focussing in particular on the potential use of location as an integrator of data.  A simple example of this is making a link between traffic counts on a road and the data from a pollution sensor on the same road - only by knowing the location of both of these data items can they be linked.
Based on this, we believe that location has the power to provide a lowest common denominator for a major challenge facing DT - data interoperability.  This challenge becomes particularly important as DT scale from local/single application towards urban and national scales, where connected twins model system of systems approaches to major engineering challenges.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: (m)App my data!   Exploring the power of location as a data integrator for Net Zero Digital Twins
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: There is an increasing amount of open data available to researchers and the public, from official sources also from crowd sourcing and social media.  Example data sources include data.gov.uk, data.world, data.un.org and many more.
Bringing this data together as needed is fundamental to creating Digital Twins (digital models linking the digital and physical world).  Digital Twins are in turn core to achieving Net Zero targets.
Putting data on a map is one way to bring data from different sources together (known as data integration).  Some of the vast quantities of data can be put on a map very easily - i.e. they contain coordinates and can be opened in mapping software such as a Geographical Information System (GIS) or online map (e.g. Google Maps).  However, some data is more difficult to map - e.g. a PDF report or a video doesn't contain coordinates so might have to be linked to some other data to be mapped.
Star ratings are used by people every day to make purchasing, holiday and many other decisions.  They are usually multi-factor (e.g. value for money, comfort, location, cleanliness.  To help Digital Twin creators understand what data they could use, the question to be addressed by this research is: Can we develop a map-ability star rating for open data and embed this in a user-friendly App?    
It is expected that the student will explore the (m)Appability of data in the context of FAIR principles of data sharing, which state that data should be findable (you know it exists), accessible (you know how to get hold of the data),  interoperable (you can use it with other data) and reusable (you can use the same data for different purposes).

Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • Develop (manually prototype) a visual rating / scale of the (m)Appability of a sample of open datasets.  This could be a star rating, a pie chart (e.g. as used in food labelling) or similar with factors that include whether the data can be mapped at all, whether it is up to date or out of date and others to be identified by the student.
  • Extend an existing interactive Web App (HTML, Leaflet and Javascript, training available) to showcase each dataset and its associated rating
  • A0 poster and interactive demonstration

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • basic knowledge of Geographical Information Systems (e.g. QGIS, ArcGIS) - e.g. understanding layers, shapefiles, coordinate systems, some spatial analysis
  • interest in data management/data engineering
  • some basic scripting/coding (any language) and a willingness to learn web coding skills

Details of Supervision arrangements: Weekly meetings.  Additional supervision/training for App development. 


Project Number: 8


Augmented Reality User Interface

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Anthony Steed
Department of Supervisor: Computer Science
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: a.steed@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Social Collaboration in Mixed Reality
Brief summary of main research project: We are interested in how people will use the upcoming generation of consumer augmented reality glasses. We see a major use to be collaboration with remote people, such that those remote people can understand the situation that the augmented reality user is in. The remote person might be using a desktop, smartphone or virtual reality interface. We are interested in how the users collaborate, and how we might build tools to support this situation.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Augmented Reality User Interface
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: How do we represent remote users in augmented reality?  Can collaboration in mixed reality be as effective as collaboration in a similar situation in the real world?  What tools will help an augmented reality user communicate with remote users?
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • Working prototype of a user interface for an augmented reality system  
  • Demonstration to a group of users of the prototype  
  • Potentially a pilot study with the prototype
  • Short report and A0 poster

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Ability in or willingness to learn C#/Unity  
  • General understanding of computing systems and hardware  
  • Experience with recent augmented reality systems (e.g. on smartphones) would be an advantage

Details of Supervision arrangements: Scholar would work in our lab day to day, and would meet with the supervisor weekly. Other post-doctoral fellows and PhD students would assist. 


Project Number: 9


A bio-impedance analysis-based HMI system for robotic control

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Yu Wu
Department of Supervisor: Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: yu.wu.09@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Z-Anatomy: Bioelectrical Impedance Anatomy for hand motion interpretation
Brief summary of main research project: Advanced prostheses can improve the quality of life for people who suffer from upper-limb loss, but current myoelectric prostheses provide only coarse motions resulting in limited user acceptance.   As a promising human-machine interface (HMI) approach, surface electromyography (sEMG) has undergone extensive development, especially for hand prosthesis. Although sEMG can offer high recognition accuracy >95%, the acceptance of the powered upper limb prosthesis is still very low. The fundamental challenges relate to the sEMG signals. The sEMG amplitude is up to tens of mV with frequencies up to about 500 Hz. This makes recording susceptible to noise and low frequency interference.   Bio-impedance analysis, similar to sEMG, involves a number of electrodes placed on the subject. The technique measures impedance by applying a small ac current and measuring the voltage developed on the skin surface. It is commonly used for body mass index assessment, or as an imaging technique for lung function monitoring. In contrast to sEMG, the frequency and the amplitude of bio-impedance recording’s voltages are directly related to the current drive. Hence, it can be user-programmable to produce an optimum signal-to-noise ratio . Also, since the frequency of the signal is tuneable up to 1 MHz, it can be moved away from low-frequency interference, such as the 50 Hz mains, which makes the system more robust. In addition, because different types of human tissue, e.g., bone, fat or muscles have different impedance features due to their biological structure, frequency differentiation could be possible with bio-impedance recording.   In this project, we aim to detailly exam the merits of bio-impedance recording for HMI and to develop a new pathway with the Z-Anatomy concept for dexterous hand motion interpretation.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: A bio-impedance analysis-based HMI system for robotic control
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Could bio-impedance analysis-based HMI provide better selectivity? More specifically, can bio-impedance analysis interrogate different or deep tissue groups with frequency spectroscopy for more accurate robotic control?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: To develop electronic hardware for bio-impedance analysis with an operating frequency up to 1MHz, and investigate the bio-impedance feature of the sample objects over the frequency range. With good outcomes, conference publication at The IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) 2024 is encouraged.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Circuit design
  • CAD and robotics
  • Programming Python or C

Details of Supervision arrangements: Project meeting each week 


Project Number: 10


Single antenna FMCW radar using UCL's ARESTOR system

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Nial Peters
Department of Supervisor: Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: uceenpe@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): ARESTOR - A multi-role RF Sensor based on the Xilinx RFSoC
Brief summary of main research project: ARESTOR is an ongoing research project within the radar group in Electronic and Electrical Engineering to develop a multi-role RF sensor platform which can be used for a variety of research projects. The system is based around the Xilinx Radio Frequency System on Chip (RFSoC), which combines high-frequency digital to analogue and analogue to digital conversion tightly coupled with high-performance digital signal processing capabilities. Originally developed to operate as an active-radar, passive-radar and electronic surveillance receiver the system has now been used in a wide variety of research projects including integrated sensing and communication (ISAC) and Internet of Things (IoT) spectrum survey.    RFSoC devices are still relatively new technology, and represent a step-change in the capabilities of commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware. They will be pervasive throughout all domains of RF sensing in the near future, in particular in 5G communications systems and next-generation radar and electronic surveillance receivers.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Single antenna FMCW radar using UCL's ARESTOR system
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: ARESTOR is a flexible and reconfigurable RF sensing system developed at UCL. It is based on the relatively new Radio Frequency System on Chip (RFSoC) devices from Xilinx and is capable of performing a multitude of RF sensing tasks (including radar).    Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radars are well suited to low-cost, short range sensing applications such as automotive radar. ARESTOR already implements a variety of different FMCW sensing modes and these are frequently used for radar experiments within the Radar Group. FMCW uses simultaneous transmit and receive, requiring good isolation between the two. This is typically achieved using separate antennas for transmit and receive.    

This project would research the possibility of implementing a single-antenna FMCW radar on the ARESTOR platform by using a second transmit channel to provide active-cancellation (think noise cancelling headphones!) of transmit signal that leaks into the receive path. Similar systems already exist, but typically use analog components to provide the phase and amplitude control required for the cancellation signal. This project would leverage ARESTOR's arbitrary waveform generation capabilities to implement this digitally, resulting in a simpler and more flexible solution.    

Aspects of this project could include:

  • Design of an RF printed circuit board to implement the combining of the cancellation signal into the receiver.
  • Experiments to determine cancellation performance.
  • Algorithm development to automate the optimisation of the cancellation signal.
  • Development of FPGA hardware for accelerating the optimisation process or for real-time feedback.
  • Outdoor radar experiments using the single antenna design to validate its performance.

Outputs expected by the Scholar: Depending on the focus of the research, outputs could include:

  • RF PCB for single antenna FMCW use.
  • Control software for operating ARESTOR as a single antenna FMCW radar.
  • Dataset of lab-based test results of cancellation performance.
  • Dataset of outdoor radar measurements using a single antenna FMCW mode.
  • Poster or conference paper detailing the research findings.
  • FPGA IP blocks for optimising the cancellation signal parameters.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Good software skills (preferably with some knowledge of Python).
  • Some experience of electronics and PCB design if hardware design is chosen as an avenue of research.

Details of Supervision arrangements: Since a large part of this project will be practical, in addition to the required formal meetings, at least one of the project team will be available to supervise the student in the lab at least three days a week. 


Project Number: 11

Internet of Things (IoT) direction of arrival (DoA) system based on Xilinx RFSoC.

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Colin Horne
Department of Supervisor: Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: uceehor@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): ARESTOR - A multi-role RF Sensor based on the Xilinx RFSoC
Brief summary of main research project: The aim of the ARESTOR project is the development of a multi-role radio frequency (RF) sensor which can operate in multiple different modes either simultaneously, or serially, by reprogramming the system on-the-fly, as operational requirements change.  The system is based on the Xilinx RF System on a Chip (RFSoC), an integrated device combining a large area of field programmable gate array (programmable logic) with very high-speed analogue to digital and digital to analogue converters.  The system has been demonstrated as an active radar and a passive radar, as well as a surveillance system for monitoring the RF environment, including the detection and parameter estimation of Internet of Things (IoT) LoRa signals.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Internet of Things (IoT) direction of arrival (DoA) system based on Xilinx RFSoC.
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: This project aims to employ the UCL ARESTOR multi-role RF sensing platform based on a commercial off the shelf (COTS) hardware device, the Xilinx RFSoC, to identify the direction of arrival (DoA) of IoT signals, specifically the LoRa communications signal.    

The research team has previously developed algorithms for identifying the presence of LoRa signals and estimating the transmission parameters. The algorithms have been translated from a PC based Matlab implementation to a version running in real-time on the FPGA in the ARESTOR platform. The work proposed will look to extend the capabilities by developing a system to provide the direction of arrival (DoA) of the detected signal.    

The project could include the design and implementation of experiments to collect LoRa signal data using the ARESTOR platform, research and development of suitable algorithms for direction finding in an offline implementation (Matlab,Python,C) and development of FPGA modules to allow aspects of the system to operate in real-time.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: The primary output of the project would be an offline software implementation of a direction of arrival system which uses ARESTOR captured data as its source input. The software could be translated to an FPGA implementation if time allows.  A database of captured signals might be created and made available outside of the project if the scholar undertakes experiments to capture data.  An A0 poster detailing the research undertaken will be produced, with the possibility of a conference publication.  A short report will be produced.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes, but flexibility is possible.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Excellent Matlab and/or Python coding.  
  • Skills in, or an interest in, one or more of radio frequency sensing, electronics design, antenna design, FPGA design, depending on research direction scholar wishes to take.

Details of Supervision arrangements: Weekly supervisory meetings would be scheduled, with additional meetings if required. Additional contact for experimental work and field trials if the project progresses to this stage. 

Project Number: 12

Exploring the landscape of mutations in Gaucher disease

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Ben Hall
Department of Supervisor: Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Faculty of Supervisor: Engineering Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: b.hall@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Predicting the clinical impact of mutations using protein structure
Brief summary of main research project: Mutations in genes can lead to a wide range of inherited diseases. Whilst genome sequencing is now routinely part of the clinical diagnosis pathway, many mutations are classified as "variants of unknown significance" which cannot be tied to an effect on protein function. Predicting the impact of a mutation from the sequence offers a route to improved diagnosis and can support therapeutic selection.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Exploring the landscape of mutations in Gaucher disease
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: In this project the student will adopt techniques used in other proteins (see for example https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jcim.1c00063) to establish tools for predicting and classifying mutations that cause Gaucher disease. This will include studying the impact of protein misfolding, the location of the mutations on the protein relative to known biological features (e.g. the active site), and other biophysical features.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: In terms of research outputs, the student would be aim to  

  • collect mutations known to cause disease and be benign from public databases
  • plot and visualise the distribution of mutations across the protein structure
  • calculate the impact of each mutation on protein folding using HPC resource  
  • use statistical techniques to show how different protein features may be used to classify existing mutations  

The student will use all data generated to produce a poster of the data.  A short report will also be required.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Experience in either mathematical/computational sciences (with a clear interest in biology) or life sciences with some mathematical skills  
  • Coding experience is desirable and will make the project more straightforward  
  • Some familiarity with protein structure is desirable

Details of Supervision arrangements: My group runs in a hybrid way, so communication is a mix of online and in person. We will meet and communicate regularly through

  • weekly group meetings (teams)  
  • weekly (up to 30 minute) one-to-one meetings (teams, with option for in person)  
  • slack for messaging and quick requests  
  • email.

Towards the end of the project you will be supported in preparing your report and poster.


Institute of Education

Project Number: 13


Sound Spikes: Designing, constructing and evaluating musical interfaces using Lego, Spike Sensors and Raspberry PI computers

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Ross Purves
Department of Supervisor: Culture, Communication and Media
Faculty of Supervisor: Institute of Education
Email address of Supervisor: r.purves@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Lego, Making, and Music
Brief summary of main research project: The overarching project is concerned with exploring and exploiting the intersection of making, music, and engineering using the medium of LEGO, for purposes in education and performance.  The work is aimed at educators in schools, and the resulting resources embrace building instructions, associated SonicPI and Python code and supporting documentation.   Previous activity in this theme has encompassed the development of hybrid physical and digital instruments and an exploration of their use in the classroom, the investigation of LEGO construction methods and how these impact the acoustic properties of the resulting models, and a synthesis of worldwide approaches to LEGO musical instrument construction leading to the beginnings of an international research network in this area.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Sound Spikes: Designing, constructing and evaluating musical interfaces using Lego, Spike Sensors and Raspberry PI computers
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: This project is intended to result in the generation of a library of open source, web-published resources relating to design and construction of digital musical interfaces using Lego components, Spike prime sensors and Raspberry PI computers. Building on existing UCL research, the goal will be to evaluate these digital musical interfaces in a realistic educational setting such as a classroom or workshop. This project is expected to result in the generation of a library of open source, web-published resources relating to design and construction of digital musical interfaces using Lego components, Spike prime sensors and Raspberry PI computers.    The research questions are therefore:

  • How can Spike sensors be used with a Raspberry Pi in the service of inspirational music education (drawing on work in the New Interfaces for Musical Expression community among others)?
  • How can these approaches be embodied in LEGO designs to support and inspire educators to build on and extend them for their own purposes?
  • How can resources (e.g. software libraries) be created to make adoption by educators as easy as possible?
  • How well do the exemplars produced work in classroom practice?

Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • A0 poster (which could possibly be re-purposed as part of the 2023 Dept Culture, Communication and Media annual research and teaching jamboree).
  • A library of building instructions, code and associated audio, graphical and textual support materials for the developed digital musical interfaces.
  • An evaluation of the developed digital musical interfaces, in the form of a UCL-hosted blog or similar, and potentially published as part of a journal article co-authored by the Laidlaw scholar and supervisory team.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Practical skills in Python computer programming, ideally on Raspberry Pi (or other linux-based systems)
  • Practical skills in music, and an interest in music education and/or creative applications of technology
  • Strong skills in the textual and graphical communication of technical information in English

Details of Supervision arrangements: Formal meetings would be held between the scholar and supervision team at the start, mid-point and end of the project as a minimum. These would be supplemented with further informal and technical meetings where needed, along with the inclusion of a fieldwork episode (details to be confirmed) to evaluate the designs developed. Supervision would be led by Dr Ross Purves, and supported by Dr Nicolas Gold and Professor Evangelos Himonides. Working space would be provided within the music education area of the Institute of Education. 


Project Number: 14


Youth voice and sustainable futures for higher education

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Lizzie Rushton
Department of Supervisor: Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment
Faculty of Supervisor: Institute of Education
Email address of Supervisor: l.rushton@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Youth voice in shaping sustainable futures for higher education
Brief summary of main research project: Climate Change and Sustainability Education is a core part of societies' response to current global environmental crises and contemporary national and yet, international youth movements continue to draw attention to inadequacies of current education systems to equip young people in the face of real and urgent climate crises. At the same time, opportunities for youth voice, knowledge and ideas to inform and shape decision making in relation to climate change and sustainability, including education, continue to be limited. This project attends to this gap as it provides an opportunity for a Laidlaw scholar to facilitate workshops with their peers to gather their ideas and knowledges focused on the climate change and sustainability education they currently receive in the context of undergraduate programmes. Using participatory workshops the project will work collaboratively with students aged 18-22 to share their ideas for the future of higher education which foregrounds climate change and sustainability education, for all. As part of the project outputs, the Laidlaw scholar will be supported to co-create with participants a policy brief focused on the findings from the workshops. There will also be opportunities to write a blog and contribute to an academic output.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Youth voice and sustainable futures for higher education
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: What are young people's priorities for climate change and sustainability education in higher education?
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • A0 poster
  • blog for UCL's Centre for Climate Change and Sustainability Education webpage
  • co-created policy brief focused on the place of CCCSE in higher education
  • opportunities for co-authorship of an academic output (this will necessarily extend beyond the life of the project)
  • short report.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Excellent interpersonal communication skills to support facilitation with peers  
  • Excellent organisational and project management skills  
  • High level of written fluency in English

Details of Supervision arrangements: There will be a weekly meeting (online or in person by arrangement) with the Laidlaw Scholar and the supervisor, Dr Lizzie Rushton 

Project Number: 15

Marking two hundred years of students at UCL

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Professor Georgina Brewis
Department of Supervisor: Education, Practice and Society
Faculty of Supervisor: IOE
Email address of Supervisor: g.brewis@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Generation UCL: Two Hundred Years of Student Life in London
Brief summary of main research project: As UCL starts the countdown to its bicentenary in 2026, a new research and engagement project puts students and alumni at the heart of the history of UCL. Students' Union UCL also celebrates 130 years in 2023. A project run in partnership with OVPA, Students' Union UCL and IOE, ‘Generation UCL’ explores 200 years of student life in London, turning institutional history upside down to suggest that the first students of 1828 should be seen as the real ‘founders’ of UCL. Generation UCL will establish the first major collection of oral history interviews with UCL alumni and support the deposit of students’ union archive material with UCL Special Collections. Planned project outputs include an open access book with UCL Press, an Octagon exhibition and a programme of impact and engagement activities to involve the whole UCL community.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Marking two hundred years of students at UCL
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Generation UCL is planning a series of engagement activities in 2023 to share the findings of our research including an Octagon exhibition, publication of a short history of the Students' Union, a blue plaque scheme around campus, walking trails and tours and associated events. The Laidlaw Scholar would support work on these engagement activities, exploring questions such as what stories about student life at UCL in the past should we tell? How we engage current students with UCL's rich history? What themes and topics are of greatest interest, and how can we present diverse stories in engaging and exciting ways? What was it like to be a UCL student in the past, what difference did gender, LGBTQ+ experience, 'race', class, migrant status, or religion play? What individuals or groups of students should we recognise with blue plaques or in other ways through this project?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: Blog posts for the Generation UCL website  Report of reserach findings  Contributions to engagement activities such as walking tours, exhibitions, events, and other programming  A0 poster
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Strong written English skills  
  • Interest in working with historical sources  
  • Creativity and initiative

Details of Supervision arrangements: Formal meetings will be held with both supervisors (Professor Georgina Brewis) and Generation UCL Research Fellow (Dr Sam Blaxland). Involvement with wider project group as needed. 
 


Faculty of Laws

Project Number: 16


A critical perspective on English contract law

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Niamh Connolly
Department of Supervisor: Laws
Faculty of Supervisor: Laws
Email address of Supervisor: n.connolly@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Critical Perspectives on Contract Law
Brief summary of main research project: I am interested in conducting research on critical perspectives on contract law, in order to inform and enrich my teaching of contract law at UCL. This is a process that we have begun by, for example, asking student curriculum partners to review our contract law syllabus. Traditionally, contract law has been taught in quite a doctrinal way, in which we accept judges’ values and assumptions about what justice in private law relations looks like. Private law generally assumes that people interact on an equal footing, and that any inequalities that actually exist between people should not affect the rules. Limiting the frame of debate in this way can be quite conservative. It dovetails with a liberal prioritisation within contract law of guiding values such as individual freedom and commercial certainty. While these values are important, a contract law designed to uphold them might reinforce the privilege of those who are already advantaged in society or fail to meet some people's needs. By focusing on this limited group of core values as the most important legitimate concerns within contract law, we are likely to neglect other important perspectives on what the law ought to achieve, and how it can promote justice in the interactions between private parties. Notice, for instance, that English contract law has an extremely limited doctrine of unconscionable bargains, whereas other common law jurisdictions around the world are more willing to use this tool to regulate exploitative contracts. American legal scholarship has adopted critical perspectives on legal doctrine for decades. In particular, some of these critical perspectives examine the effect of the law on people of different races or gender. Less work has been done in the UK to interrogate critically the effect of English contract law on people of different races, wealth, gender or sexuality. Identifying insights from American scholarship and investigating how they might apply in the different UK context requires research into the primary legal materials. I am beginning to conduct some of this research. My primary purpose is to enrich my teaching of contract law. I plan also to present outputs on our research findings at conferences, and perhaps to publish a journal article about my findings. For the Laidlaw project, I am looking for a student who is personally interested in applying a critical lens to some aspect of contract law, focusing on a specific critical perspective and working in a fairly self-directed way that will feed in to our understanding of the wider issues.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: A critical perspective on English contract law
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: I am looking for a Laidlaw Scholar who has a keen personal and intellectual interest in designing their own research project that will examine some aspect of contract law from a specific critical perspective. Do you consider that the values and assumptions of contract law neglect or are somehow inadequate to respond appropriately to the real-world situations and needs of some groups of people? Do certain rules work unfairly for certain groups of people? If so, are you interested in researching this question in an intellectually-rigorous way? Can you help to articulate how the law is imperfect, or how it might be improved? Think about research that you could do on contract law under the umbrella of this project that might benefit society, in keeping with the ethos of the Laidlaw Scheme.   If you are interested in doing this project, I invite you to decide for yourself on a specific research question that fits into the overarching theme. Identify the perspective from which you would like to interrogate contract law doctrine (eg race or gender) and think carefully in advance about which doctrines of contract law you will focus on. What question would you be able to investigate and answer in a six week research project? Your question can be quite specific or narrow, and will still contribute to our understanding of the overall theme. We build up knowledge piece by piece. The scope of your project should not be too big to answer in six weeks. Think next about what method you could use to find the answer to your research question. What kind of evidence or reasoning will you use to analyse the law? Will you focus on case law/doctrine, or will you consider scholarship from areas outside law? You may draw on any expertise you have, including outside of law. I have an open mind concerning what research question you would like to study or how you plan to investigate it. You can study doctrines that are not currently on the UCL contract law syllabus, if you are interested in them or think they are important. If you have a good idea for a project, submit it. Don’t hesitate because it might differ in some way from examples I mention here.  Please do think carefully before writing your application about your specific research question and the method that you will be able to use to formulate an answer to that question: a well thought-through research proposal is likely to impress the selection panel. I recommend that you do a little prior reading and reflection to enable you to identify a topic or question that is likely to provide an illuminating research focus. Check out whether there has already been literature written on your proposed topic that you can build on. Even though your project will be a relatively small one, involving six weeks’ work, it will make a valuable contribution to scholarship if you choose an important socially-relevant subtopic and explore it thoroughly, carefully and insightfully.   When conducting the research project itself, the scholar would typically begin by conducting preliminary research on the secondary literature, to familiarise themselves with the existing scholarship that articulates critical perspectives on contract law. I will expect them to conduct original primary research into English case law, using legal databases, and to engage thoroughly for themselves with case law (rather than relying too much on secondary literature). The researcher will use their critical analytical skills to interrogate what they discover in the cases. This will not just be the doctrinal legal analysis that we typically do in a law degree, which takes the law’s basic assumptions for granted and focuses on the quality of legal reasoning. Rather, the scholar will engage in a broader critique of the law’s values and operation. Given the plurality and complexity of the common law, the student might discover ways in which the case law does actually try to protect less-advantaged people, despite its articulated commitment to upholding the terms of bargains. The researcher will be expected to approach the evidence in a balanced and fair-minded way, paying attention to evidence that points in different directions and making sense of how it fits together. The scholar might use empirical evidence or material from disciplines other than law to highlight deficiencies in the law. If the scholar wishes to do empirical research (such as a survey) they should talk to me about this early (after the selection process) so that they can write a request for ethics approval in good time before starting the project. In addition to identifying difficulties with the operation of the current law, the student might be able to formulate and advocate for specific reforms to the law. I have an open mind and welcome the scholar’s own ideas about how they will investigate their research question.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: During the research process, I expect the scholar to discuss their research findings with me orally, to keep written notes of their research, and occasionally to write me a written note on a point.  As their research outputs, I expect the scholar to prepare:

  • a database (spreadsheet) that presents the relevant information about the case law that they locate and analyse
  • an essay on this topic (that they might choose to prepare for publication)
  • a poster presenting their findings

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? I can supervise the project during the standard period but I will be abroad at a conference in the last week. We can work around this. It may be easier if you could be flexible about your end date/last meeting. I will supervise the project remotely online.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 
The scholar must:  (1) combine an awareness of and interest in interrogating contract law from critical perspectives (such as race, relative wealth or gender) with the ability to conduct rigorous, evidence-based research;  (2) be committed to independently locating relevant case law by searching databases of legal cases, and have the skills both to find relevant case law and to identify and understand judges’ reasoning (using the common law method);  (3) write clearly, concisely and in a well-structured way.
Details of Supervision arrangements: I will supervise through weekly meetings online. An assistant supervisor will also meet with the scholar in person. 


Faculty of Life Sciences

Project Number: 17


Cellular ‘self-eating’ and calcium: what’s the link?

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Alexander Agrotis
Department of Supervisor: Cell and Developmental Biology
Faculty of Supervisor: Life Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: a.agrotis@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Exploring the relationship between autophagy (cellular 'self-eating') and calcium homeostasis in mammalian cells.
Brief summary of main research project: When most eukaryotic cells are under stress, they increase their level of autophagy ('self-eating') to repair cellular damage and recycle nutrients. This process helps to improve cell survival. Therefore, finding new ways to alter the level of autophagy holds promising therapeutic potential for diseases associated with cell stress (e.g. neurodegeneration).   Calcium ion signalling is involved in numerous cellular pathways from nerve transmission to embryo fertilisation. Certain types of membrane calcium channels, including the TPC (two pore channel) family, are present on lysosomes: organelles which are also the final destination of the autophagy pathway. However the link between lysosomal calcium signalling and autophagy is still debated and needs to be studied further.  This project is a collaboration that will combine the expertise of several labs at UCL studying autophagy and lysosomal calcium channels. It will involve growing gene-edited mammalian cell lines and studying their autophagy responses, using protein analysis and advanced microscopy. The findings of this project will enhance our understanding of how autophagy is regulated.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Cellular ‘self-eating’ and calcium: what’s the link?
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: How do regulators of TPC activation influence autophagy?  Using mammalian cells that have been gene-edited so they are missing genes involved in TPC activation, the successful scholar will use cell biology experiments to uncover how autophagy is affected. This will involve growing the cells, stimulating autophagy and measuring how the cells respond using protein analysis techniques and microscopy. The experiments will also be carried out on non-edited (wild-type) cells at the same time, to provide a comparison of the normal level of autophagy.
Outputs expected by the Scholar:

  • Digital laboratory notebook detailing experimental details and results.  
  • A0 poster.  
  • Set of powerpoint slides or brief written report displaying and explaining key results in figure format (including poster figures plus anything extra).
  • Short report.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Keen interest and basic understanding of molecular cell biology.  
  • Enthusiasm towards learning cell biology laboratory techniques (pipetting, protein and DNA analysis, advanced microscopy).

Details of Supervision arrangements: You would be supervised in the lab by the main supervisor (Dr Alex Agrotis), who will provide training until the scholar can work independently. The main supervisor will also be available to meet on a regular basis. There may be some additional project input from a senior secondary supervisor (Prof Sandip Patel) and collaborators (Prof Robin Ketteler). 


Project Number: 18


Career trajectory and success of neurosurgeons

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Marianna Kapsetaki
Department of Supervisor: Cell and Developmental Biology
Faculty of Supervisor: Life Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: marianna.kapsetaki.15@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Career trajectory and success of neurosurgeons
Brief summary of main research project: This project will examine the career trajectory and success of neurosurgeons as regards to their education, current affiliations, and scholarly activity.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Career trajectory and success of neurosurgeons
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Are there gender or skin colour disparities among neurosurgeons?  Are there any such disparities in their scholarly activity?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: A spreadsheet with the data that the student collects. If they have time, I will also supervise them on how to analyse the data (e.g. using SPSS or JASP). If they have time, then they will also be able to prepare a poster to present at a conference.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? The project can run any time over the summer period that is convenient for the student and supervisor.  
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Has an eye for detail.
  • Is very careful and patient when collecting data.

Details of Supervision arrangements: I am happy to have meetings with the student once a week or every two weeks and will respond to their emails (maximum reply time 24h). 


Project Number: 19


Career trajectory and success of psychiatrists

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Marianna Kapsetaki
Department of Supervisor: Cell and Developmental Biology
Faculty of Supervisor: Life Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: marianna.kapsetaki.15@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Career trajectory and success of psychiatrists
Brief summary of main research project: This project will examine the career trajectory and success of psychiatrists as regards to their education, current affiliations, and scholarly activity.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Career trajectory and success of psychiatrists
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Are there gender or skin colour disparities among psychiatrists?  Are there any such disparities in their scholarly activity?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: A spreadsheet with the data that the student collects. If they have time, I will also supervise them on how to analyse the data (e.g. using SPSS or JASP). If they have time, then they will also be able to prepare a poster to present at a conference.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? The project can run any time over the summer period that is convenient for the student and supervisor.  
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Has an eye for detail.
  • Is very careful and patient when collecting data.

Details of Supervision arrangements: I am happy to have meetings with the student once a week or every two weeks and will respond to their emails (maximum reply time 24h). 


Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Project Number: 20


Nature-inspired self-healing for organic electronics

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Bob C. Schroeder
Department of Supervisor: Chemistry
Faculty of Supervisor: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: b.c.schroeder@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Self-healing organic semiconductors for bionic skin
Brief summary of main research project: As electronic devices are becoming further integrated into our lives, the transition from portable to wearable devices is imminent. Skin-inspired electronic materials are needed to develop devices that can be worn on the skin for applications such as medical diagnostics and monitoring to provide enhanced healthcare in the future. Organic conjugated polymers are ideal materials for this function due to their intrinsic flexibility, solution processability and ability to tune the electronic properties through chemical design which is important for the integration into different electronic devices. Additionally, these biomimetic materials require the ability to heal themselves upon deformation and subsequent damage to restore their mechanical and electronic properties. A potential method achieving intrinsic self-healing is based upon supramolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding which offer dynamic and reversible crosslinking within the polymer matrix.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Nature-inspired self-healing for organic electronics
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Can we integrate hydrogen bonding units into conjugated polymers and exploit their functionality to induce self-healing?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: The scholar will learn how to study and characterise self-healing polymers and write up the results in a short lab report. Furthermore, we would expect the scholar to produce an A0 poster with their key findings and present them to the research group.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 
The scholar should have an interest in synthetic and/or materials chemistry, and be enthusiastic about working in an academic laboratory setting.
Details of Supervision arrangements: The Laidlaw scholar will meet weekly with the PI (Dr Bob Schroeder) and will be directly supervised in the laboratory by a postdoctoral researcher and/or senior PhD student. 


Project Number: 21

Low temperature deposition of indium oxide thin films for applications in optoelectronic devices

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Anna Regoutz
Department of Supervisor: Chemistry
Faculty of Supervisor: Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: a.regoutz@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Transparent Conducting Oxide Materials for use in Optoelectronic Devices
Brief summary of main research project: Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are unique given that they combine both optical transparency and electrical conductivity. These materials are typically deposited in the form of thin films. The applications for TCOs are vast and include flat panel displays, solar cells, touch screens, smart sensors and water-splitting devices. However, the next generation of electronics is heading towards the need for flexibility. In recent years there has already been a push to replace the typical large flat glass substrates used in electronics with smaller and thinner plastic substrates, in hopes of developing TCO materials that are foldable or even rollable. To achieve this, low temperature solution processed thin film deposition methods are being used as they are cheaper, simpler, and more environmentally friendly.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Low temperature deposition of indium oxide thin films for applications in optoelectronic devices
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Indium oxide (In2O3) is a key member of the family of TCOs. Typically, In2O3 is deposited in the form of thin films, which can be achieved by a variety of physical and chemical methods. The use of solution processes to produce thin films has become popular in recent years as it is a cheap and simple method, often only requiring indium-based precursors and solvent without the need for high temperatures or vacuum of traditional techniques. Additionally, doping with metals and non-metals is commonly used to strategically optimise its physico-chemical behaviour and performance. This project aims to investigate the conditions in which high quality thin films of indium oxide can be deposited through a simple sol-gel route. It involves investigating a range of synthesis parameters, with emphasis on finding a low temperature synthesis route, as well as the effects doping has on the resulting thin films. By engaging in a variety of material characterisation techniques such as, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) you will have the opportunity to analyse and understand how altering your synthesis affects the physical and optoelectronic properties of the thin films.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: The scholar will be expected to keep a detailed laboratory notebook throughout and collect a full dataset of the thin film characterisation results, such as XPS, UV-vis and XRD. Additionally, a short scientific report of the results will be required. The scholar will also be expected to present their findings in our weekly group meetings.  An A0 poster will also be required.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  1. Basic knowledge or inorganic chemistry
  2. Practical chemical laboratory skills

Details of Supervision arrangements: Short weekly meetings with the scholar will be arranged with myself and Aysha Riaz (PhD student leading the project) and the scholar will also be expected to attend our weekly group meetings where they will present their work and progress alongside the rest of the group. 


Faculty of Medical Sciences

Project Number: 22

Sport, exercise and physical activity: improving menstrual health experiences

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Jo Blodgett
Department of Supervisor: Institute of Sport Exercise and Health
Faculty of Supervisor: Medical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: joanna.blodgett@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Physical activity and menstrual health: a micro and macro approach
Brief summary of main research project: Menstrual health is an integral aspect of women’s health, underlying many aspects of overall physical, mental and social health and well-being. Despite severe and widespread negative menstrual health experiences, upstream approaches to minimise or eliminate negative symptoms are rarely adapted. Our team is interested in how exercise, sport or daily physical movement can positively impact menstrual experiences in both the general population and in elite athletes.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Sport, exercise and physical activity: improving menstrual health experiences
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Our team has many different avenues and methods of research; the successful scholar is invited to choose the one they are most interested in (or propose their own related to periods/menstrual health) and will have help developing it into a project. If the project involves data collection, ethics will be sought (led by the supervisor) before the project begins.

  1. qualitative data collection (i.e. interviews) to understand barriers to period tracking (i.e. why female athletes do or don't track their periods and symptoms on an app), or how being on period impacts approaches to training and competition.
  2. quantitative survey of female footballers to quantify how periods impact training/competition and understand current knowledge and support received from their club
  3. analysis of existing data. This project would be geared towards a student who enjoys coding or stats, and wants to explore associations using existing data. The available data has data on ~5000 girls from birth to adolescence to early and midlife. For example, the scholar could explore how early life menstrual experiences influence midlife experiences or how physical activity patterns in adolescent positively or negatively influence menstrual outcomes.
  4. Public translation of research. The scholar is invited to take existing research findings and transform them into information that is widely accessible by the public- this could be a short cartoon video, infographics, a public engagement event, school lessons, etc.
  5. data collection and interpretation of an ongoing research project examining cognitive function (i.e. hand-eye coordination, decision making, reaction time, attention) across different phases of the menstrual cycle in female athletes.

Outputs expected by the Scholar: The scholar would be expected to undertake data collection over the first 2-3 weeks (unless using existing data). They would then have the opportunity to analyse the data and write a report. If of interest, we will support the scholar in turning the report into a paper for publication, where they will be named as first-author.  An A0 poster will also be required.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes, there is some flexibility for the project to start later if the scholar prefers.

Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • an eye for detail
  • excellent communication skills
  • ability to work independently.

Details of Supervision arrangements: The student will be invited to work in the Institute of Sport Exercise and Health on a day-to-day basis. Weekly supervision meetings will take place between the scholar and the supervisor and there will be more frequent support available during the analysis phase.


Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences

Project Number: 23


Emotions in learning and assessment

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Cathy Elliott
Department of Supervisor: Political Science
Faculty of Supervisor: Social and Historical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: cathy.elliott@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): What does it feel like to be assessed?
Brief summary of main research project: We know that assessment is a highly emotional process: from anxiety about deadlines to the pleasure of curiosity to the fear of getting a low mark to the defensiveness of receiving feedback to the joy of finishing a qualification, there are a lot of feelings involved. However, much of the literature on assessment either ignores students' emotions or focuses on them in an instrumental way to ask questions about what sort of emotions would be most conducive to getting high marks or becoming more employable. In contrast, this project takes a more critical approach and asks what students learn through the emotional demands of assessment, how they are produced as particular sorts of subjects and whether there are forms of, or approaches to, assessment that allow students to take a critical and reflexive approach to education.    By the summer of 2023, I will have a large amount of rich qualitative data elicited from students on how it feels to be assessed in various ways as part of a degree at UCL. This data will need to be transcribed, coded, analysed and communicated. This is therefore an exciting opportunity for a Laidlaw scholar to be involved in a practical project to work with original qualitative data, analyse it and potentially use it to support advocacy for on-the-ground change in their own institution.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Emotions in learning and assessment
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: What are the main themes in the current scholarly literature on the emotions around assessment in HE?  What are the main themes coming out of the qualitative data about how it feels to be assessed?  What sort of student subject positions are assumed and reproduced through assessment?  What sorts of assessment are most valued by students?  What sorts of assessment seem to be produce critical and reflexive thought about learning and Higher Education?  How can our assessment practice be practically improved?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: Could be any or all of:

  • Transcribed and coded data  
  • A0 poster  
  • Short film  
  • Research report  
  • Series of short case studies

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Open-mindedness particularly to critical approaches to education  
  • Ability to write/communicate well with specific audiences in mind

Details of Supervision arrangements: Weekly meetings (6 meetings in total) 


Project Number: 24

Climate Change and Investment Protection

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Prof Lauge Poulsen
Department of Supervisor: Political Science
Faculty of Supervisor: Social and Historical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: l.poulsen@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Climate Change and Investment Protection
Brief summary of main research project: Scholar will assist on research project on the implications of global investment protection rules for climate change policies.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Climate Change and Investment Protection
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: What are the implications of global investment protection rules for climate change policies? How can empirical and regulatory linkages best be visualised, including through video editing?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: An edited video that, if approved, could become part of an OECD work programme.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? No; likely 13 June to 22 July - although there could be minor additional work later subject to OECD approval.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Video editing in Premiere Pro
  • Advanced data visualisation
  • High level of written fluency in English.

Details of Supervision arrangements: Regular meetings in person or online with project supervisor as well as OECD officials. 


Project Number: 25

Foreign language education reforms in Europe.

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Roland Kappe
Department of Supervisor: Political Science
Faculty of Supervisor: Social and Historical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: r.kappe@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): The political effects of foreign language education reforms in Europe.
Brief summary of main research project: This ongoing project looks at the impact of foreign language education – and especially foreign language education reforms – on people’s attitudes and political opinions.

Theory suggests that speaking foreign languages reduces perceptions of cultural distance and contributes to the formation of transnational identities (Benet-Martinez and Haritatos 2005, Kuhn 2011). Recent research also shows a link between foreign language skills and European identity (Kuhn 2015, Díez -Medrano 2017). The project however goes beyond just correlational work and seeks to identify the causal effect of foreign language learning on a variety of social and political attitudes, national and European identity, and political behaviour. Education reforms provide plausibly exogenous variation in individual foreign language learning. The project has resulted in a working paper using education reforms in the United Kingdom, and the next step is to expand this theoretical and empirical framework to other national contexts.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: Foreign language education reforms in Europe.
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: How is foreign language education structured in a specific European country, or a small number of countries? What are the key education reforms that affected language education? What were the effects of these reforms?
Outputs expected by the Scholar: For one (or perhaps a small number of) European countries (taking into account the Laidlaw scholar’s background, educational experiences, interests and language skills):

  • Provide a systematic overview of current foreign language education policy.
  • Identify key reforms that affected foreign language education in these countries.
  • Produce one (or perhaps a number of) “country reports” that  a) provides a systematic overview of current foreign language education policy.  b) identifies and describes key reforms that affected foreign language education and includes a ‘timeline’ of foreign language education policy reforms.
  • If the scholar also has quantitative methods skills, the project could also include some data analysis of the effects of the reform, but this is not an essential skill or project component.
  • An A0 poster and short report are also required.

Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • Very good proficiency, especially reading comprehension, in one or more European languages (other than English, German, or Italian which have already been covered) is essential.    
  • Good written proficiency in English and good academic writing skills (e.g. conscientious referencing etc.)    
  • The ability to read and understand government documents, such as laws, white papers, etc. in the target language, and the ability synthesise existing research on education policy are essential. Familiarity with the education system of the respective country (e.g. by having attended secondary school) would be desirable but not essential.

Details of Supervision arrangements: There would be ongoing meetings over the six week period. We had weekly meetings in 2020 which worked well. As a minimum there will be:  1) General orientation, overview of the project, goals, expectations.  2) Meeting early during the project to answer questions.  3) Weekly progress meetings to assess progress of the country report.  4) Final meeting after completion of the project.    Related work might be presented at conferences or workshops during or after the six week period. If this is the case – and if practically feasible, and if there is interest – I would be happy to take the Laidlaw scholar to one of these events. This is obviously completely dependent on circumstances. The entire previous project was conducted online due to the pandemic. 


Project Number: 26

History and the Rustat memorial plaque controversy

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Dr Aaron Graham
Department of Supervisor: History
Faculty of Supervisor: Social and Historical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: aaron.graham@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): Recognition and Reparation in Philanthropy
Brief summary of main research project: This is a project funded by the Rockefeller Foundation to explore how philanthropic and educational institutions can address the recognition of benefactors and others whose deeds and actions now sit at odds with contemporary values.  The aim is to produce a ‘toolkit’ of principles that will allow institutions to address the contested periods of their histories in a way informed by historical scholarship.  More details are available at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/research/research-projects/recognition-and...
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: History and the Rustat memorial plaque controversy
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The Scholar will examine whether history informs contemporary debates about recognition and reparation practices.  A high-profile legal case ended in early 2022 with the ruling that a memorial plaque to Tobias Rustat (1608-94), an investor in the slave trade, in the chapel of Jesus College, Cambridge, should not be removed.  Part of this case included the presentation of expert witness statements regarding the extent of Rustat’s involvement in the slave trade, and the final judgement turned in part on this historical question.  The scholar will examine reporting and commentary on the Rustat case in the local, national and international media to assess (1) how far newspapers accurately reported the historical facts of the case, (2) whether their commentary was influenced by the expert witness reports, and (3) the broader role that historical scholarship therefore played in forming wider views of the Rustat case in particular, and questions of recognition and reparation in general.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: The Scholar will assemble a collection of reports giving details of how media outlets reported on the Rustat case and the impact of historical scholarship on perceptions and understandings of the Rustate case.  They will also work with the supervisor to produce an article of approximately 4,000 words to be submitted as a ‘Viewpoints’ piece to the leading historical journal Past & Present, with appropriate acknowledgement being given to the Scholar for their work.  They will also receive help in producing an A0 poster presenting their research findings.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? The project will run over the standard six week period, but the specific dates can be tailored to the needs of the Scholar.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  • High level of written fluency in English.  
  • Experience of research using modern newspaper databases, or a willingness to learn.  
  • Ability to present research findings clearly in a written format.

Details of Supervision arrangements: The supervisor will meet with the Scholar at the start and end of the project, and at least once during the middle, or more often if desired.  Meetings from late June onwards will be held online. 


Project Number: 27


ACT UP New York and the Politics of Health Care in the HIV-AIDS Emergency

Supervisor Details
Name of Scholarship Project Supervisor: Professor Jonathan Bell
Department of Supervisor: Institute of the Americas
Faculty of Supervisor: Social and Historical Sciences
Email address of Supervisor: jonathan.bell@ucl.ac.uk
 
Project Details
Title of main project (the main project to which the Laidlaw Scholar's project will relate): The Health Care Closet: Sexual Politics and American Health since the Rights Revolutions
Brief summary of main research project: This project explores how the development of a valorised private sector in health care financing interacted with a parsimonious welfare system to shape how sexual minorities saw themselves – and each other – as political subjects in the 1970s and 1980s United States. Considering sexual minority rights together with the crisis in health care access, I examine the interactions of LGBTQ rights with state and private health politics. My overarching project stakes a new claim to the importance of the sexual rights question in understanding the broad direction of political economy in the transition from welfare liberalism to free market fundamentalism.
Title of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: ACT UP New York and the Politics of Health Care in the HIV-AIDS Emergency
Summary of Laidlaw Scholar's Project: The Laidlaw Scholar would explore oral interviews from ACT UP activists recorded as part of the ACT UP oral history project https://actuporalhistory.org/ as well as ACT UP archival materials available at the LSE Hall-Carpenter collections and online via Gale Archives of Gender and Sexuality (UCL subscribes to this major resource). They would explore how activists involved in ACT UP thought about health care rights and health care access during the first decade of the HIV crisis in the United States. An option to think about this question in comparative context with the UK, given the existence of the National Health Service here, would be available, using research materials at LSE and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Outputs expected by the Scholar: The scholar would make research notes on the interviews and archival collections and take digital photographs to create a personal archive that could be shared with the supervisor. They would be guided in developing further research questions to add an analytical element to the research notes.  A short report and A0 poster are also required.
Do you expect the Laidlaw project to run over the standard six week period? Yes - this would be an ideal time period for the project.
Outline up to THREE essential skills which the scholar must have in order to undertake your project successfully: 

  1. High level of written and reading fluency in English  
  2. Aptitude for understanding the key points of a source and making notes that draw out the wider significance for the project
  3. Ability to organise research notes and corresponding digital photographs effectively, to allow both researcher and supervisor to be able to use them as a research base.

Details of Supervision arrangements: The supervisor and scholar would meet weekly, either online or in person, to discuss progress, themes and topics emerging from the research, and next steps.