International Crime Science Conference

Nick Ross Chairing

12 July 2016, British Library, LONDON

This year the 10th International Crime Science Conference will take place on 12th July 2016 at the British Library in London. The theme of this year’s conference is "Securing a changing world: crime reduction and security provision in an era of unprecedented social, technological and political change"

The conference will showcase leading research that is helping to tackle threats to our society. In particular it will focus on the way crime and security providers are responding to the challenges created by sweeping change on many fronts; societal change, global political upheavals and unprecedented technological advances. Topics covered will include Cyber Security, Forensics, Security Technologies, Future Crimes, Terrorism, Organised Crime and Evidence-led Policing.  

The conference, which has enjoyed consistently high approval ratings from delegates over the past nine years, brings together senior security practitioners, policy-makers, technologists and academics, all developing the latest techniques and technologies for preventing crime and increasing security. The conference is supported by the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction at the College of Policing.

(Please note: talk/speaker details will be updated here as they are confirmed)

9.30 Welcome

9.45 Opening Plenary

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock OBE, UCL Security and Crime Science and Director, What Works in Crime Science Reduction Consortium

The Crime Drop
Professor Graham Farrell, University of Leeds

10.30 Coffee and Student Posters

11.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Future Crimes

Chair: Professor Paul Ekblom, Central St Martins

Bronte Room: Policing and Use of Evidence-Based Research

Chair: Professor Kate Bowers, UCL Security and Crime Science

Police Collaboration, Dr Lisa Tompson, UCL Security and Crime Science

The What Works Centre for Crime Reduction and police professionalization: findings from the independent evaluation, Professor Mike Hough, Institute for Criminal Policy Research

Dickens Room: Image Processing in Crime and Security

Chair: Thomas Rogers, UCL Security and Crime Science

Securing borders using X-ray imaging and deep learning
Dr Nicolas Jaccard, UCL Computer Science

Using Automatic Object Recognition Techniques for Threat item Detection in CT and X-ray Baggage Security Imagery
Dr Toby Breckon, Durham University

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

11.45 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism

Chair: Dr Noemie Bouhana, UCL Security and Crime Science

A Comparison of Suicide & Non-Suicide Attackers in the U.S, Professor Joshua Freilich, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Bronte Room: Forensics Session

Chair: Dr Ruth Morgan, UCL Security and Crime Science

TBC, June Guiness OBE, Forensic Science Regulation Unit, Home Office

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

12.45 – 13.45 Lunch and Student Posters


13.45 Auditorium:  Afternoon Plenary

Chair: Professor Richard Wortley, UCL Security and Crime Science

Future Crimes

Professor Ken Pease, UCL Security and Crime Science

14.30 Coffee and Student Posters

15.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Cybercrime

Chair: Dr Gianluca Stringhini, UCL Security and Crime Science

Loved and Lost: A psychological examination of the Online Dating Romance Scam
Professor Monica Whitty, University of Leicester

Understanding what happens to leaked account credentials, Jeremiah Onaolapo, UCL Computer Science

TBC, Dr Lorenzo Cavallero, Royal Holloway University

Bronte Room: What Works in Crime Reduction

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock, UCL Security and Crime Science

Costing Tool, Professor Nick Tilley, UCL Security and Crime Science

The Systematic Review Landscape, Dr Aiden Sidebottom, UCL Security and Crime Science

What Works for Reducing Domestic Abuse: Risk-led policing and the DASH risk assessment tool, Andy Myhill, College of Policing

Dickens Room: Organised Crime

Chair: Dr Paul Gill, UCL Security and Crime Science

The European Refugee Crisis and Organized Crime: A critical assessment, Klaus Von Lampe, Jon Jay College of Criminal Justice

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

16.00 Break

16.15 Auditorium:  Panel Discussion: We are living in an era of unprecedented social, technological and political change. The pace of this change, and the turbulence it creates in our societies, has clear implications for the way we approach crime reduction and security provision moving forward. Discuss.

Chair: Steve Welsh, National Crime Agency

Panelists:

Prof Paul Ekblom, Central St Martins
Prof Joshua Freilich, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Prof Graham Farrell, University of Leeds

17.00 Drinks and networking
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

Registration for the International Crime Science conference can be accessed via this link.


Registration costs

  • Early bird rate:   £199
  • Concessionary Rate (Probationary police officers, UCL and non-UCL students and UCL Staff only):   £99
  • Speakers and invited guests - Use the code provided by the administrator


To book please click on this link.

*For those wishing to attend the Evidence Based Policing (EBP) Workshop entitled "Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators” please follow this link to register rather than the one above*

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
What Works
To register for both the conference and the workshop please follow this link (you will not need to register elsewhere to attend the conference)

Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

EBP WORKSHOP at the 10th International Crime Science Conference

July 12th, British Library, London

What are the challenges to embedding evidence-based approaches in policing? How can these best be overcome? Are we making the most of existing opportunities to embed evidence-based approaches in policing?

The College of Policing is the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction (WWCCR), and since 2013 has been working with an academic consortium to develop a strong evidence base to inform decision-making around policing and crime reduction. The College is engaged in a range of activities to build capability and capacity of officers and staff across the service to understand and undertake evidence-based approaches.

One example of WWCCR activity to support the wider use of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP) was the development and piloting of a Police Development Programme by academic consortium partners. The development programme aimed to enable police officers to appraise and use evidence to inform their decision-making. The design and piloting of this programme enabled the officers and staff involved to share their experiences about the challenges and opportunities of implementing evidence based practice and evaluation in policing.

The workshop is spread over two sessions. Attendees must attend both sessions.

Session 1 - 11.00am to 12.45pm

Professor Nick Fyfe (Scottish Institute for Policing Research) and Levin Wheller (College of Policing) will introduce the findings from the pilot Police Development Programme (drawing on work by Fyfe, and Professor Jenny Fleming and Dr Jenni Wingrove at Southampton University) and outline other WWCCR activities which aim to build capability and capacity to undertake EBP across the service.

Session 2 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

Fyfe and Wheller will lead a discussion with attendees around how best to tackle identified barriers and make the most of facilitators to implementing EBP.

The aims of the workshop sessions are:

· To share key findings from the pilot Police Development Progamme;

· To highlight other WWCCR activities aiming to build capability & capacity for EBP across the service;

· To work with delegates to better identify and understand the nature of barriers and facilitators to implementing EBP approaches in police organisations;

· To work with delegates to identify approaches that could be used to best embed EBP in forces.

Who should attend?

This session will be of interest to all police officers and police staff with an interest in evidence-based policy and practice. Researchers who work with police organisations are also encouraged to attend.

Is there a charge to attend?

There is no charge for attendance to this workshop. Participants are invited to enjoy other sessions at the conference, lunch and the evening reception (Usual charge £199). 

Page last modified on 23 feb 16 11:41