International Crime Science Conference

Nick Ross Chairing

12 July 2016, British Library, LONDON

This year the 10th International Crime Science Conference will take place on 12th July 2016 at the British Library in London. The theme of this year’s conference is "Securing a changing world: crime reduction and security provision in an era of unprecedented social, technological and political change"

The conference will showcase leading research that is helping to tackle threats to our society. In particular it will focus on the way crime and security providers are responding to the challenges created by sweeping change on many fronts; societal change, global political upheavals and unprecedented technological advances. Topics covered will include Cyber Security, Forensics, Security Technologies, Future Crimes, Terrorism, Organised Crime and Evidence-led Policing.  

The conference, which has enjoyed consistently high approval ratings from delegates over the past nine years, brings together senior security practitioners, policy-makers, technologists and academics, all developing the latest techniques and technologies for preventing crime and increasing security. The conference is supported by the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction at the College of Policing.

(Please note: talk/speaker details will be updated here as they are confirmed)

9.30 Welcome

9.45 Opening Plenary

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock OBE, UCL Security and Crime Science and Director, What Works in Crime Science Reduction Consortium

The Crime Drop
Professor Graham Farrell, University of Leeds

10.30 Coffee and Student Posters

11.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Future Crimes

Chair: Professor Paul Ekblom, Central St Martins

Horizon Scanning – tools for the future

Dick Lacey, CAST

The Dark Side of Criminal Business - On the evolution and profitability of underground market commoditisation

Rolf van Wegberg, Delft University of Technology

Bronte Room: Policing and Use of Evidence-Based Research

Chair: Professor Kate Bowers, UCL Security and Crime Science

How to make Police-Researcher partnerships mutually effective, Dr Lisa Tompson, UCL Security and Crime Science

The What Works Centre for Crime Reduction and police professionalization: findings from the independent evaluation, Professor Mike Hough, Institute for Criminal Policy Research

Dickens Room: Image Processing in Crime and Security

Chair: Thomas Rogers, UCL Security and Crime Science

Securing borders using X-ray imaging and deep learning
Dr Nicolas Jaccard, UCL Computer Science

Using Automatic Object Recognition Techniques for Threat item Detection in CT and X-ray Baggage Security Imagery
Dr Toby Breckon, Durham University

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

11.45 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism

Chair: Dr Noemie Bouhana, UCL Security and Crime Science

A Comparison of Suicide & Non-Suicide Attackers in the U.S, Professor Joshua Freilich, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Communicating about lone actor terrorism, Dr Julia Pearce, King's College London

Project Regulus – The Threat from Lone Actor Terrorism in the UK, Paul Betley, Greater Manchester Police and the North West Counter Terrorism Unit

Bronte Room: Forensics Session

Chair: Dr Ruth Morgan, UCL Security and Crime Science

Role of Quality Standards - DNA technology developments, June Guiness OBE, Forensic Science Regulation Unit, Home Office

Soil Forensics, Dr Georgia McCulloch

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

12.45 – 13.45 Lunch and Student Posters


13.45 Auditorium:  Afternoon Plenary

Chair: Professor Richard Wortley, UCL Security and Crime Science

Future Crimes

Professor Ken Pease, UCL Security and Crime Science

14.30 Coffee and Student Posters

15.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Cybercrime

Chair: Dr Gianluca Stringhini, UCL Security and Crime Science

Loved and Lost: A psychological examination of the Online Dating Romance Scam
Professor Monica Whitty, University of Leicester

Understanding what happens to leaked account credentials, Jeremiah Onaolapo, UCL Computer Science

DroidScribe: Classifying Android Malware Based on Runtime Behavior, Lorenzo Cavallaro, Royal Holloway University of London

Bronte Room: What Works in Crime Reduction

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock, UCL Security and Crime Science

Economic Analysis for Crime Reduction: What Works?, Professor Nick Tilley, UCL Security and Crime Science

What do we know about what works to reduce crime? A systematic review of systematic reviews, Dr Aiden Sidebottom, UCL Security and Crime Science

What Works for Reducing Domestic Abuse: Risk-led policing and the DASH risk assessment tool, Andy Myhill, College of Policing

Dickens Room: Organised Crime

Chair: Dr Paul Gill, UCL Security and Crime Science

The European Refugee Crisis and Organized Crime: A critical assessment, Klaus Von Lampe, Jon Jay College of Criminal Justice

Refugee Crisis and Opportunities for Organised crime: the victims’ perspective, Chiara GallettiCrime, Violence and Instability work stream

Elliot Room: Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

*Separate Registration Required - Please see registration page*

Chairs: Professor Nick Fyfe, Scottish Institute for Policing Research & Levin Wheller, College of Policing

16.00 Break

16.15 Auditorium:  Panel Discussion: We are living in an era of unprecedented social, technological and political change. The pace of this change, and the turbulence it creates in our societies, has clear implications for the way we approach crime reduction and security provision moving forward. Discuss.

Chair: Steve Welsh, National Crime Agency

Panelists:

Prof Paul Ekblom, Central St Martins
Prof Joshua Freilich, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Prof Graham Farrell, University of Leeds

Klaus Von Lampe, Jon Jay College of Criminal Justice

17.00 Drinks and networking
REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

Registration for the International Crime Science conference can be accessed via this link.


Registration costs

  • Early bird rate:   £199
  • Concessionary Rate (Probationary police officers, UCL and non-UCL students and UCL Staff only):   £99
  • Speakers and invited guests - Use the code provided by the administrator


To book please click on this link.

*For those wishing to attend the Evidence Based Policing (EBP) Workshop entitled "Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators” please follow this link to register rather than the one above*

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
Professor Gloria Laycock, OBE
 
Gloria Laycock  

BIOGRAPHY

Gloria Laycock graduated in psychology from University College London in 1968 and completed her PhD at UCL in 1975. She worked in the Home Office for over thirty years of which almost twenty years were spent on research and development in the policing and crime prevention fields. She has extensive research experience in the UK and has acted as a consultant and trainer on policing and crime prevention in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, India, South Africa and the Middle East.

In 1999 she was awarded an International Visiting Fellowship by the United States Department of Justice based in Washington DC. She returned to the UK in April 2001 from a four-month consultancy at the Australian Institute of Criminology in Canberra to become Founding Director of the UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science. In 2010 she took special leave from UCL to establish the Community Policing and Police Science Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. She has now returned to UCL as Professor of Crime Science and is Director of the Commissioned Partnership Research Consortium of eight UK universities supporting the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

She was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2008 for services to crime policy.

CHAIR, Plenary One: Crime Drop

CHAIR, What Works in Crime Reduction

 
Professor Richard Wortley  
richard-wortley  

BIOGRAPHY

Richard Wortley is Director of the Jill Dando Institute at UCL, Head of the Department of Security and Crime Science at UCL and Director of the SECReT Doctoral Training Centre.  He has a PhD in psychology, and worked as a prison psychologist for ten years before moving to academia. He was head of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University (Australia) for 9 years, and is a past national Chair of the Australian Psychological Society’s College of Forensic Psychologists. His research interests centre on environmental criminology and situational crime prevention. In recent years his research has been particularly concerned with the role that immediate environments play in facilitating child sexual abuse. He has been a chief investigator on 8 national competitive grants in Australia with total finding of around $Aus2 million.

WELCOME ADDRESS

CHAIR, Plenary Two: Future Crimes 

 
Professor Graham Farrell  
G Farrell  

BIOGRAPHY

Graham Farrell is professor at the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies in the School of Law at the University of Leeds. Previous posts including having been professor at Simon Fraser University (Canada) and at Loughborough University, working at the Police Foundation in Washington D.C, at the United Nations in Vienna and, at the University of Oxford. His PhD is from the University of Manchester (1993/4). He has published 15 books and over 100 other articles and papers. His main research interest in recent years has been the crime drop and the security hypothesis.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Descending Mount Improbable: The Crime Drop and Elegant Security

ABSTRACT

The most important criminological phenomenon of modern times is the crime drop. For 25 years many crime types have declined in England and Wales and elsewhere. Largely discredited explanations include the role of police and prisons, childhood lead poisoning and immigration. There is strong evidence that improved security played a principal role in reducing property crime, potentially reducing violence as a positive knock-on effect. Vehicle security improved dramatically in the 1980s and spread gradually, while households without security became a rarity and the spread of double glazing brought stronger glass and frames plus integrated locks for window and doors. This is consistent with crime opportunity theory, suggesting Internet-related and other crime should be tackled by reducing opportunities. The new security is more likely to be unobtrusive, particularly as it becomes smarter, consistent with the pursuit of liberty in a democratic society.

 
Dr Paul Ekblom  
Dr Paul Ekblom  

BIOGRAPHY

Paul Ekblom read psychology and gained his PhD at University College London. As a researcher in the UK Home Office for many years, Paul initially worked on crime prevention projects including police truancy patrols, shoplifting, drink and disorder, and crime on the London Underground.  He then orchestrated the industrial-scale evaluation of the Safer Cities Programme, focusing on the impact of residential burglary projects. Final Home Office responsibilities centred on horizon-scanning; advising on Design against Crime (including on Safer Places, the government guide to crime prevention and the planning system, and the Foresight project Cyber Trust and Crime Prevention) and developing the professional discipline and knowledge management of crime prevention.  

Paul has worked internationally with EU Crime Prevention Network, Europol, Council of Europe, Australian Institute of Criminology, Government of Abu Dhabi, and UN. He is currently part-time Professor at the University of the Arts London Research Centre on Design Against Crime, based at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design; also Visiting Professor at the Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield, and the Department of Security and Crime Science, UCL. His current work covers design and evaluation of products, places, systems and communications; horizon-scanning, and developing practice-knowledge and process evaluation frameworks for general and cyber crime prevention, community safety, counter-terrorism and problem-oriented policing. These frameworks can be viewed at www.designagainstcrime.com/methodology-resources/crime-frameworks andhttp://5isframework.wordpress.com

CHAIR, Future Crimes

 
Dick Lacey  
D Lacey  

BIOGRAPHY

Dick Lacey joined PSDB (now Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST)) in October 1979 after obtaining B.Sc. and Ph.D. from University of London and worked initially on the development of protective equipment for the police. Dick moved to work on explosives detection after the bombing of the Grand Hotel in Brighton and took responsibility for some of the aviation security research programme in 1989 after Pan Am 103, eventually becoming Chief Scientist for CBRNE at Home Office Scientific Development Branch. Dick was also the head of Public Protection Sector which included a number of projects to address the prevention of acquisitive crime. Since partially retiring in 2014, Dick has had responsibility for CAST’s futures and innovation work.

Dick has been a member of a number of international fora in the field of contraband detection and am a fellow of the Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Horizon Scanning – tools for the future

ABSTRACT

Nobody can predict the future with any accuracy but one thing is certain and that is that the future is going to happen. Being better prepared is essential. This presentation will describe the activity of horizon scanning and introduce some of the tools that can be used to help that process. Some specific examples will then be discussed including threats and opportunities arising from the development of the internet of things and the increasing use of autonomous systems.

 
Rolf van Wegberg  
Rolf van Wegberg  

BIOGRAPHY

Rolf van Wegberg is a cybercrime researcher at the Technology, Policy and Management Faculty of Delft University of Technology and the Cyber Security & Resilience division at TNO. Originally trained as a criminologist, he received his MSc-degree (cum laude) in Criminology from Leiden University.

In 2013 he joined TNO, where he works as a research scientist on the economics of (financial) cybercrime. Predominantly he is involved in TNO’s Dark Web program, wherein he researches new and evolving criminal business models, in particular crime-as-a-service models on underground markets. As a researcher at Delft University of Technology, his research is embedded in the MALPAY project wherein he studies the criminal strategies used by cybercriminals in banking malware attacks and the interactions between these strategies and the (security) policies of the financial service providers.

PRESENTATION TITLE 

The Dark Side of Criminal Business - On the evolution and profitability of underground market commoditisation

ABSTRACT

The dark side of the internet can be easily accessed, and it is getting more and more popular amongst (cyber)criminals to deploy criminal activities. Using the TOR-protocol (The Onion Router) anonymous browsing is available for the general public, and increasing amounts of criminals see the advantages of moving their activities to the Dark Web. Ranging from drugs- and weapon trade to cybercrime-as-a-service, the Dark Web is the new anonymous, place-to-be for an increasingly large group of criminals.

This talk covers concrete examples of (novel) criminal activities as well as the evolution and profitability of criminal business models on the Dark Web. Using the case of ‘ransomware-as-a-service’, the question arises: are the lessons-learned of tackling (traditional) crime still valid when analysing this new platform wherein anonymous criminal marketplaces exist and entirely new - highly profitable - criminal business models are used.

 
Professor Kate Bowers  
kate-bowers  

BIOGRAPHY

Kate Bowers is a Professor in Security and Crime Science at the UCL Department of Security and Crime Science. Kate has worked in the field of crime science for 20 years, with research interests focusing on the use of quantitative methods in crime analysis and crime prevention. She has published 75 papers and book chapters in criminology and in journals such as Criminology, the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and the Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency. She has guest edited a special issue of Crime Prevention Studies and co-edited a book on Crime Mapping. She serves on a number of journal editorial boards, and she has number of external appointments such as expert reviewer for a project run by the US Office of the Assistant Attorney General. Her work has been funded by grants from the Home Office, the US Department of Justice the Police, the Department for Education and Skills, and UK research councils such as the ESRC and AHRC. She is Co-Investigator on a EPSRC grant for £1.4m on Crime Policing and Citizenship. She is also a Co-Investigator on the ESRC funded What Works Centre for Crime Reduction initiative run in collaboration with the College of Policing.

CHAIR, Policing and the Use of Evidence-Based Research

 
Dr Lisa Tompson  
Lisa Tompson  

BIOGRAPHY
Dr Lisa Tompson’s work focuses on research and analysis that can be used by policing and crime reduction practitioners to better understand and prevent crime. She is passionate about doing translational research which can be used to facilitate knowledge exchange with crime reduction practitioners and regularly trains practitioners in key theoretical concepts and practical techniques that allow them to optimize their analytic outputs. Lisa has most recently been involved in assembling, appraising and synthesising the evidence base for the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction. PRESENTATION TITLE  How to make Police-Researcher partnerships mutually effective ABSTRACT With recessionary budgets forcing police agencies to rethink their approaches to resourcing, and prevailing political climate favouring evidence-based poling, effective police-researcher partnerships have never been so sorely needed. In this presentation the essential ingredients of an effective police-researcher partnership are unpacked and organised into a theory of change. In doing so, we expose the barriers that might undermine partner relationships and provide an evidence-based approach to setting up and perpetuating partnerships that are mutually beneficial and produce reciprocated knowledge.

PRESENTATION TITLE

How to make Police-Researcher partnerships mutually effective

ABSTRACT

Dr Lisa Tompson’s work focuses on research and analysis that can be used by policing and crime reduction practitioners to better understand and prevent crime. She is passionate about doing translational research which can be used to facilitate knowledge exchange with crime reduction practitioners and regularly trains practitioners in key theoretical concepts and practical techniques that allow them to optimize their analytic outputs. Lisa has most recently been involved in assembling, appraising and synthesising the evidence base for the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

 
Mike Hough  
Mike Hough  

BIOGRAPHY

Mike Hough is Professor of Criminal Policy at Birkbeck, University of London. Mike was a member of the team that started the British Crime Survey at the Home Office Research and Planning Unit, in the early 1980s. He set up an academic policy research centre in 1994, now based at Birkbeck as ICPR.  Mike’s research interests include: procedural justice theory and public trust in justice; policing and police legitimacy; sentencing; and offender rehabilitation and desistance.  

PRESENTATION TITLE
Evaluating the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction: emerging findings

ABSTRACT

This presentation will summarise emerging findings from the first two years of  ICPR’s 3-year evaluation of the College of Policing’s What Works Centre for Crime Reduction, one of the nine centres that are members of the Cabinet Office network of What Works centres.

 
 Thomas Rogers
 
Thomas Rogers  

BIOGRAPHY

Thomas Rogers is a PhD student at University College London, supervised by Dr Lewis Griffin (UCL Comp. Sci.) and hosted within both the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Security and Crime Sciences. His current research focuses on the automated analysis of radiographic images for security, and is funded by the EPSRC and Rapiscan Systems Ltd. Previously, Thomas’ research activities have included; the development of Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) for the analysis of complex quantum systems whilst at Imperial College, the analysis of synthetic aperture radar images whilst at DSTL, and analysis of data from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Thomas holds the MSci in Physics with Theoretical Physics from Imperial College London, and the MRes in Security Science from University College London. Thomas has won various degree prizes during his MSci and MRes studies, and recently won Silver for engineering at the SET for BRITAIN competition held at the House of Commons.

SESSION TITLE

Machine vision for border security

ABSTRACT

Border agencies are confronted by a vast and diverse array of threats, from organized crime networks using cargo containers to smuggle contraband, to a lone wolf attempting to detonate an improvised device on a commercial flight. Security regulations are becoming increasingly stringent and it is a challenge for technology to keep up. This is compounded by the ever increasing flow of goods and persons across international borders, and the economic requirement to maintain high throughput. Typically, cargo, persons or baggage are scanned at checkpoints and a human operator searches the image for threats. But human operators are error prone, susceptible to bribery, and are expensive to train and employ. This session explores the use of machine vision for threat detection and its potential for assisting human operators in baggage and cargo screening.

 
 Nicolas Jaccard
 
Nicolas Jaccard  

BIOGRAPHY

Nicolas Jaccard received a B.Sc. from the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland in 2009. He then pursued postgraduate studies at University College London where he was awarded an MRes in biological complexity modelling in 2010 and a PhD in biomedical image-processing in 2014. Nicolas is now a research associate in the Griffin lab image analysis group in the department of computer science at University College London where he applies machine learning and image processing techniques to biomedical and security problems, including the detection of threats in X-ray cargo images.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Securing borders using X-ray imaging and deep learning

ABSTRACT

Millions of containers are shipped every year. Each of these containers represent a potential opportunity for malicious actors to smuggle goods through borders. The cost of failing to detect smuggling events is in most cases monetary (e.g. tax or duty evasion). However, missing certain classes of prohibited goods, such as "small metallic threats", might pose concrete and severe security risks. The security infrastructure must thus be suitably equipped to detect such threats.

In this talk, we present a deep learning approach for the automated detection of "small metallic threats" in X-ray cargo images. Due to the scarcity of threat-containing images, a novel image synthesis method was developed to generate a suitably large number of examples to alleviate the data bottleneck that commonly affects deep learning methods. Multiple convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architectures trained from scratch on X-ray images, as well as CNNs pre-trained on natural images, were evaluated.

To our knowledge, this is the first application of deep learning to X-ray cargo images. The performance obtained is very promising, significantly surpassing more conventional detection schemes. It is likely that similar results could be obtained for other type of threats given sufficient training data. This work paves the way for the deployment of automated cargo container inspection systems at borders and ports.

 
Toby Breckon
 
Toby Breckon  

BIOGRAPHY

Toby Breckon is currently a Reader (UK Associate Professor) within the School of Engineering and Computer Sciences, Durham University (UK). His key research interests lie in the domain of computer vision and image processing and he leads a range of research activity in this area including applications in autonomous sensing, automated surveillance and security inspection screening systems.

Dr. Breckon holds a PhD in informatics (computer vision) from the University of Edinburgh (UK). He has been a visiting member of faculty at the Ecole Supérieure des Technologies Industrielles Avancées (France), Northwestern Polytechnical University (China), Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China) and Waseda University (Japan).

Dr. Breckon is a Chartered Engineer, Chartered Scientist and fellow of the BCS. In addition, he is an Accredited Senior Imaging Scientist and Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society. He led the development of image-based automatic threat detection for the 2008 UK MoD Grand Challenge winners [R.J. Mitchell Trophy, (2008), IET Innovation Award (2009)]. His work is recognised as recipient of the Royal Photographic Society Selwyn Award for early-career contribution to imaging science (2011).

PRESENTATION TITLE
Using Automatic Object Recognition Techniques for Threat item Detection in CT and X-ray Baggage Security Imagery

ABSTRACT

We describe the use of automatic object classification to enable development of an automated decision making tool for hand and hold baggage screening based on low-cost, 2D X-ray imagery or increasingly the use of 3D Dual-energy CT. Such techniques could also be applicable to cargo pallet screening, postal screening and building / venue protection to supplement existing X-ray screening provision.

The proposed concept of operation would see such approaches form part of a multi-screening system that would simultaneously screen a given item for (a) contents complexity and (b) items with shape characteristics of threat items (e.g. weapons – knives/guns). Used in conjunction with existing materials-based detection for explosives (Explosives Detection Systems – EDS) and narcotics, this offers the ability to automatically screen the majority of regular low complexity items, that do not contain any items indicative of a threat. Within an operating scenario, the majority of items conform to the low-complexity norm with no characteristic indicators of threat items and could potentially pass screening via automated analysis only – maximising throughput and reducing the burden/requirement for human screeners. This presentation covers current state of the art techniques and supporting evaluation results that underpin current research capability in this area from the Durham team.

 
Dr Noemie Bouhana  
Noemie Bouhana  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Noemie Bouhana is Senior Lecturer in Security and Crime Science at University College London, where she leads the Counter-Terrorism Research Group and convenes the MSc in Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism. Her research interests center on the systemic and ecological processes involved in the emergence of radicalising settings, and the role that these settings play in the individual development of a terrorist propensity, with particular attention to selection mechanisms. At present, Noemie is Principal Investigator of the €2.9M EU FP7 PRIME project, an international consortium of six European universities carrying out multidisciplinary research in the prevention, interdiction and mitigation of lone actor extremism. Most recently, she has been selected to receive a $1M Minerva grant to to study the social ecology of radicalisation in the US, UK and Denmark. Past work has been funded by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), Home Office Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT), MOD Counter-Terrorism Science and Technology Centre, and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), and the US National Institute of Justice (NIJ), among others.

CHAIR, Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism

 
Dr Julia Pearce  
Julia Pearce  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Julia Pearce is a Research Fellow in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. Her research interests include risk and crisis communication, public health behaviour, extreme events and disasters, terrorism, social identity, social representations and moral panic. Specifically, she is interested in the impact of perceived moral, cultural and health threats on behaviour. Her recent research uses social psychological theories of risk perception and health behaviour to assess the impact of risk and crisis communication on risk perception and health behaviours, with a particular focus on extreme events (e.g. chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) terrorism). Dr Pearce sits on a number of advisory boards including the Cabinet Office National Risk Assessment Behavioural Science Expert Group and the Public Health England ERDG Psychosocial and Behavioural Issues Sub-group.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Communicating about lone actor terrorism

ABSTRACT

In February 2010 then C.I.A. Director Leon Panetta described ‘the lone wolf strategy’ as the main threat to the United States. European leaders have echoed this concern, with recent lone-actor terrorist attacks in Brussels, London and Copenhagen testifying to the gravity of the threat. The difficulty in interdicting lone-actor terrorism, alongside the promotion of lone-actor events by groups such as ISIS, makes the role of public counter-terrorism communications increasingly important. Effective communication can manage public responses to terrorism, improve knowledge and encourage at-risk populations to support counter-terrorism efforts, increase doubt about terrorist ideologies in the minds of vulnerable individuals and engage the public in preparedness activities ahead of events. This paper provides an overview of the Communications Measures Work Package of the European Commissioned funded PRIME project. It presents findings from a review of existing counter-terrorism communication measures in the United Kingdom and Denmark, highlighting cross-country similarities and differences, and considers implications for future communication measures.

 
 Paul Betley
 
P Betley  

BIOGRAPHY

Paul is a highly experienced detective and investigator of serious crime within Greater Manchester Police and the North West Counter Terrorism Unit. Paul has managing multi-functional teams to investigate complex criminal and terrorism cases across national and international boundaries using covert and overt investigation techniques to obtain the required intelligence and evidence for prosecution. More recently Paul has moved into an intelligence manager and advisory role working with International and UK security partners in creating a safe “London 2012” and a further legacy of professional intelligence assessment to assist National Security specialising in the enhancement of intelligence to assist in the recognition and disruption of those who may be involved in extremist activity.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Project Regulus – The Threat from Lone Actor Terrorism in the UK

ABSTRACT

Project Regulus is a multi-disciplinary approach to addressing the lone actor threat in the United Kingdom. It brings together expertise from academia, intelligence services, clinical psychology and police practitioners.

The principle aim of this strategy is to provide greater assurance around the threat from Lone Actors:

  • To produce a justifiable and defensible decision making process to assess and manage the risk posed by potential lone actors.
  • To exploit new and existing academic research in order to identify and better understand why an individual would engage in political violence
  • To identify and understand key behavioural indicators demonstrated by Lone Actors
  • To inform interventions strategies by tailoring a response to the specific needs of the individual based on their personality type and the behaviours they engage in.
  • To significantly improve collaboration with key partners
 
Joshua Freilich
 
Joshua Freilich  

BIOGRAPHY

Joshua D. Freilich is a member of the Criminal Justice Department and the Criminal Justice PhD Program at John Jay College. He is the Creator and co-Director of the United States Extremist Crime Database (ECDB), an open source relational database of violent and financial crimes committed by political extremists in the U.S.  Professor Freilich’s research has been funded by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). His research focuses on the causes of and responses to terrorism, bias crimes, measurement issues, and criminology theory, especially environmental criminology and crime prevention.

PRESENTATION TITLE

A Comparison of Suicide & Non-Suicide Attackers in the U.S

ABSTRACT

This study explores differences in extremist perpetrators of suicide attacks and non-suicide attacks in the United States. The study relies on data from the United States Extremist Crime Database for extremist offenders between 1990 and 2013. It estimates logistic regression models to test whether suicide attackers were more likely to have exhibited several specific risk factors for suicidality, while also examining other prominent claims regarding patterns of suicide terrorism. The findings demonstrated limited support for the suicidal thesis. Suicide terrorists were no more likely than non-suicide terrorists to have previously attempted suicide or to have history of mental illness. Suicide terrorists were more likely, though, to have a history of substance abuse, to be loners (i.e., unaffiliated extremists who prepared and committed their missions alone), to have served in the military, and to have participated in paramilitary training. Suicide attackers were also more ideologically committed to the cause. We place these findings in context and highlight a number of important issues for future research.

 
Professor Ruth Morgan  
Ruth Morgan  

BIOGRAPHY

Ruth joined UCL in 2007 having completed a D.Phil in Forensic Geoscience at the University of Oxford. Her research is focussed around the role of physical evidence in the detection of crime.  Current research interests include establishing the evidence dynamics, transfer and persistence of geoforensic materials (soil, sediment, pollen etc.), and research that contributes to the production of guidelines for the practice of forensic geoscience. Recent work has concentrated on developing forensic applications of Scanning Electron Microscopy in the analysis of quartz grain surface textures.  Her research has been presented at a number of international conferences and appeared in New Scientist and the press. 

Ruth is the Director of the UCL Centre for the Forensic Sciences.  The Centre seeks to facilitate a network of UCL academics from a wide range of different disciplines and departments to enable a strategic and multidisciplinary research programme in collaboration with external partners and forensic science stakeholders.

She is a member of a number of committees including the London Geological Society Forensic Geoscience Group, the UK Forensic Science Education Group and a member of the Advisory Board of Inside Justice. She is also a reviewer for forensic geoscience submissions for a number of internationally peer reviewed journals.

Current collaborators include Dr Lewis Griffin (UCL Computer Science), Dr Peter Bull (University of Oxford), Dr Melanie Webb (University of Surrey), Dr James Robertson (University of Canberra), Dr Lorna Dawson (Macaulay Institute), Dr James Riding (British Geological Survey).

CHAIR, Forensics Session

 
June Guiness, OBE FCSFS  

BIOGRAPHY

June’s forensic science career spans three decades, as a practicing forensic biologist and court reporting officer, she carried out work in the areas of hairs, fibres, scene examination, blood, body fluid grouping, DNA and STR profiling.

June worked for the Custodian of the National DNA Database® (NDNAD) for 9 years, as the specialist advisor /DNA quality leader providing advice on DNA technical issues, business processes, quality management, policy and legislative updates and was an ISO 17025 technical assessor for the United Kingdom Accreditation Service.

For the last 7 years June has been the policy manager and scientific advisor in the Home Office, Forensic Science Regulation Unit, supporting the Forensic Science Regulator in their role of regulating quality standards in forensic science. She uses her previous experience and knowledge to advice, lead and supports the standards work of the Regulators specialist /technical review groups in blood pattern analysis, DNA, Medical Forensics (Sexual Assault Referral Centres) and Fingerprints.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Role of Quality Standards - DNA technology developments

ABSTRACT

As DNA technology moves ahead developing more sensitive and discriminating methods of detection for use in forensic DNA analysis, brings with it new challenges for validating and implementing these improvements.

The DNA profile result is the product of the journey that the analysed sample has undergone from deposition to interpretation and the various considerations that could be built into validation, implementation and interpretation of DNA results in the context of individual cases.

The presentation will touch on various aspects along the DNA process chain that can make validation less straight forward and more challenging by the increased sensitivity resulting in more DNA profile mixtures and their interpretation in the more complex body fluid cases such as those encountered in sex offences.

 
Dr Georgia McCulloch   
G McCulloch  

BIOGRAPHY

Georgia is an analytical chemist who specialises in High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method development and validation. After obtaining her BSc in Environmental Chemistry from the University of Edinburgh, and an MSc in Forensic Materials form Heriot-Watt University she spent a number of years working on R&D projects to support a range of commercial and academic clients in the pharmaceutical industry. She returned to academia to join UCL’s EPSRC funded Security Science doctoral training programme, with the aim of developing practical, user-friendly analytical methods for the forensic science sector, and is currently completing a PhD in Forensic Geoscience with the UCL Centre for the Forensic Sciences. She also worked for the UK Forensic Science Special Interest Group, where she helped to establish a database of UK forensic science stakeholders and their key research priorities, to help researchers identify meaningful projects, and service providers to maximise their return on R&D investment by pooling resources.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Method Development for HPLC profiling in Forensic Geoscience.

ABSTRACT

Forensic geoscience applies to the use and study of earth materials such as rocks, sediments and soils to assist with crime reconstruction, and can be useful in establishing the provenance of questioned materials or the location of evidence, yet it is rarely used in case work, relative to other, more routine types of forensic analysis. This talk will outline Georgia’s research into identifying organic markers in soil and developing a new HPLC method for soil profiling for use by forensic geoscientists to complement their existing techniques, and will cover the steps taken to ensure that the method was useful to forensic science practitioners and could be implemented in a working forensic laboratory.

 
Professor Ken Pease, OBE  
Ken Pease  

BIOGRAPHY
Originally a forensic psychologist, Ken is currently Visiting Professor at Loughborough University Before retirement  he held chairs at the Universities of Manchester and Saskatchewan, and acted as Head of the Home Office Police Research Group. During 2013 he was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Environmental Criminology Association and a commendation from the Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police for assistance with that force’s Operation Optimal. His two most recent books are Using Modelling to Predict and Prevent Victimisation (New York: Springer, 2014 (with Andromachi Tseloni)) and Self-Selection Policing (London: Palgrave 2016 (with Jason Roach)).

PRESENTATION TITLE 

The Crimes they are a Changing

ABSTRACT

Visions of future crime have tended towards the apocalyptic, with cyber warfare, the erosion and disappearance of privacy, the threatened technological supremacy of organised crime groups, and the cyber-vigilantism of groups like Anonymous auditioning as the four horsemen.  Here an attempt will be made to identify  likely social trends which bring with them changes in the supply of crime opportunities, and the pre-emptive actions which it might be prudent to take now.

 
Dr Gianluca Stringhini  
Gianluca Stringhini  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Gianluca Stringhini is a lecturer in the Departments of Computer Science and Security and Crime Science at UCL . His research interests include cybercrime, network security, social network security, web security, and malware analysis. His work was awarded a Best Paper Award at ACSAC in 2010 and a Symantec Research Labs Graduate Fellowship in 2012. Dr Stringhini holds a PhD from UC Santa Barbara, and his thesis work received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Department of Computer Science at UCSB in 2014

CHAIR, Cybercrime Session

 
Lorenzo Cavallaro
 
L Cavallaro  

BIOGRAPHY

Lorenzo "Gigi Sullivan" Cavallaro was raised in a fantastic epoch where information and knowledge was meant for those who were just curious enough. He grew up on pizza, spaghetti,Phrack (do "smashing the stack for fun and profit" and "IP spoofing demystified" ring a bell to you?), and W. Richard Stevens' TCP/IP illustrated masterpieces. Underground and academic research interests followed shortly thereafter and he has never stopped wondering and having fun ever since.  Lorenzo is currently a Reader (equivalent to Associate Professor in the USA) of Information Security in the Information Security Group (ISG) at Royal Holloway, University of London. Prior joining the ISG, Lorenzo proudly spent time at Stony Brook University (Prof. R. Sekar), as a visiting PhD scholar from University of Milan, and UC Santa Barbara (Profs Giovanni Vigna and Christopher Kruegel) and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Prof.  Andrew S. Tanenbaum) as a PostDoc Researcher---amazing and intense years he still remembers vividly.  Lorenzo's research focuses largely on systems security. To this end, he has founded and is leading the recently-established Systems Security Research Lab (S2Lab) within the ISG, which focuses on devising novel techniques to protect systems from a broad range of threats, including those perpetrated by malicious software. In particular, Lorenzo's lab aims ultimately at building practical tools and providing security services to the community at large. He is Principal Investigator and co-Investigator on a number of UK EPSRC- and EU-funded research projects, sits in technical program committee of top and well-established information security academic conferences and workshops, and has published in top and well-known venues. Lorenzo's Coursera MOOC on "Malicious Software and its Underground Economy:Two Sides to Every Story" attracted more than 100,000 students since its pilot in 2013, which makes him shamelessly bragging on his pizza, spaghetti, and Phrack heritage furthermore.

PRESENTATION TITLE

DroidScribe: Classifying Android Malware Based on Runtime Behavior

ABSTRACT

The Android ecosystem has witnessed a surge in malware, which not only puts mobile devices at risk but also increases the burden on malware analysts assessing and categorizing threats. In this talk, I will show how to use machine learning to automatically classify Android malware samples into families with high accuracy, while observing only their runtime behavior. I will focus exclusively on dynamic analysis of runtime behavior to provide a clean point of comparison that is dual to static approaches. Specific challenges in the use of dynamic analysis on Android are the limited information gained from tracking low-level events and the imperfect coverage when testing apps, e.g., due to inactive command and control servers. On Android, pure system calls do not carry enough semantic content for classification and instead I will show that relying on lightweight virtual machine introspection to also reconstruct Android-level interprocess communication increases the overall accuracy of the system. To address the sparsity of data resulting from low coverage, I will introduce a novel classification method that fuses Support Vector Machines with Conformal Prediction to generate high-accuracy prediction sets where the information is insufficient to pinpoint a single family.

 
Levin Wheller
 
Levin Wheller  

BIOGRAPHY

Levin is the Research and Analysis Standards Manager at the College of Policing and has worked in Government Social Research for over ten years. He received the Government Social Research Award for Excellence in 2013 for his work on the Greater Manchester Police Procedural Justice Training Experiment, the first randomised controlled trial of police training in the UK. Levin is Executive Advisor to the Society for Evidence Based Policing, and his current role at the College is focussed on building the capability and capacity of officers and staff to understand and apply evidence-based policing approaches as part of their professional practice. In 2014 Levin developed and delivered the College’s ‘Evidence Base Camp’, a five-day event where 60 officers and staff from across the police service worked through a series of hands-on training sessions to deliver five systematic maps on priority areas for policing. His previous work has focussed on developing the evidence base around training, behaviour change, organisational change and business improvement. Levin led the development of the Continuous Improvement Self-Assessment Matrix (CI-SAM), a tool to assist forces with organisational change, and worked closely with change leads across the police service to ensure the matrix would draw on both ‘the reality’ of organisational change in policing and the best available research evidence. 

 
Professor Nick Fyfe
 
Nick Fyfe  

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Nick Fyfe is founding Director of the Scottish Institute for Policing Research, Professor in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Dundee, and a Fellow of the Scottish Police College. He has been a Special Advisor to the Scottish Parliament’s Justice Committee for its inquiries into the use of police resource and community policing, is a trustee of the Police Foundation and co-chairs the Policing Working Group of the European Society of Criminology. His recent research has focused on witness protection arrangements in serious and organised crime cases, police investigations of reports of missing persons, and police reform in northern and western Europe. He is currently leading a four year project funded by the Scottish Government to evaluate police and fire reform in Scotland. In 2014 he was awarded the Distinguished Achievement Award by the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University in the United States and in 2015 the project on missing persons he worked on was awarded the Economic and Social Research Council’s Outstanding Impact on Society award.

 

Both Nick and Levin will be leading the workshop sessions "Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators" *Separate registration required, please see registration page*


PRESENTATION TITLE

Establishing common barriers to implementing EBP and how they can be tackled together

ABSTRACT

The ‘What Works Centre for Crime Reduction’ (WWCCR) was established in 2013 to develop a strong evidence base for decision-making around crime reduction. A key component of the WWCCR programme was the development and piloting of a Police Development Programme to enable police officers to appraise evidence and use evidence to inform their decision-making. The design and piloting of this programme enabled the police officers and staff involved to share their experiences and concerns about the challenges to the implementation of evidence and evaluation in policing practice. It is hoped the findings from the pilot training can be used as a catalyst for considering how officers involved in implementing EBP approaches, police trainers, police analysts, the College and academia can work together to tackle some of these challenges. Over 2 sessions of the conference, Professor Nick Fyfe (University of Dundee) and Levin Wheller (College of Policing) will first introduce the findings discussed above and then run a workshop exploring the common barriers and how they can be tackled together.

 
Professor Monica Whitty
 


Monica Whitty
 

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Monica Whitty is a cyber psychologist in the Department of Media and Communication at The University of Leicester. Her main focus of research is in the area of cyber security. She is first author of ‘Cyberpsychology: The study of individuals, society and digital technologies’ (Wiley, in press) with Garry Young and ‘Truth, Lies and Trust on the Internet’ (2009, Routledge) with Adam Joinson. Examples of previous research projects include: SID: An exploration of super identity (EPSRC, £1.9 million); Corporate Insider Threat Detection: cyber security inside and out (CPNI, £1.6 million); An examination of the online romance dating romance scam £100k ESRC). Examples of current projects include: DAPM: Detecting and preventing mass-marketing fraud (£1.1 million, EPSRC); Establishment of an Economic Crime Ismorphic Learning Centre (£550k, Police Innovation Fund). She has published on the following topics: cyber-relationships, online deception, stress and coping, mass marketing fraud, insider threat, online identity, deception, cyberstalking, cyberethics, internet surveillance, and taboos in video games.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Loved and Lost: A psychological examination of the Online Dating Romance Scam

ABSTRACT

The romance scam is a mass-marketing fraud, which emerged around 2007. Whitty and Buchanan (2012) estimated that almost 230,000 people may have been conned by romance fraudsters in Great Britain alone. In this scam, criminals pretend to initiate a relationship through online dating sites or social networking sites with the intention to defraud their victims of money. At a very early stage the scammer declares their love for the victim and requests that their relationship move from the dating site to Instant Messenger and email. This paper reports the findings of quantitative and qualitative studies, which aimed to gain a better understanding of the typology of the victims of this scam and the reasons why people fall victim to this scam. Overall, we found some distinctive personality traits that distinguish these victims, but also concluded that persuasion theories as well as the understanding of how ICTs are used to build a trusting relationship with the victims were critical in elucidating the reasons why individuals are conned by this particular mass-marketing fraud. The findings have implications for crime-prevention as well as to provide appropriate support for these victims.

 
Jeremiah Onaolapo  
Jeremiah Onaolapo  

BIOGRAPHY

Jeremiah Onaolapo is a PhD student in the Department of Computer Science at UCL. His research interests include malicious activity in online accounts, social network security, honeypots, online scams, and botnet activity. Before commencing his PhD research, he obtained an MSc qualification in Information Security from UCL in 2014.


PRESENTATION TITLE

Understanding what happens to leaked account credentials

ABSTRACT

Account credentials are attractive to cybercriminals, who usually seek ways to monetize the valuable and sensitive data in the online accounts that such credentials guard. However, it is unclear what exactly cybercriminals do with the compromised accounts after gaining access. We built an infrastructure capable of monitoring the activity of cybercriminals that gain access to 100 Gmail accounts under our control, with the aim of understanding their modus operandi. In order to lure them into interacting with the accounts, we leaked the account credentials on various outlets, and monitored accesses to the accounts over a period of 7 months. We observed attempts to evade login anomaly detection systems, and recorded some interesting case studies, including an attempted blackmail attack. 

 
Dr Aiden Sidebottom  
Aiden Sidebottom  

BIOGRAPHY
Aiden Sidebottom is a Lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London

PRESENTATION TITLE

What do we know about what works to reduce crime? A systematic review of systematic reviews


ABSTRACT

Evaluation research concerned with crime reduction is vast but of variable quality. Systematic reviews have emerged as a method of sifting, assessing and summarizing the available evidence. However, systematic reviews themselves vary in quality, scope, and can be difficult to locate. This paper describes research conducted in support of theWhat Works Centre for Crime Reduction. The aim was to systematically search the literature to determine the extent and types of systematic reviews of crime reduction interventions and, using the EMMIE framework, rate and rank the evidence provided in such reviews to explore what we know about what works to reduce crime.

 
Nick Tilley
 
Nick Tilley  

BIOGRAPHY

Nick Tilley is a member of the Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science (JDI) at UCL. He has long-term research interests in policing and crime prevention as well as in programme evaluation methodology. Alongside Matthew Manning (Australian National University), Shane Johnson (UCL), and Gabriel Wong and Margarita Vorsina (both Griffith University), he produced the economic guidance element of the ESRC/College of Policing funded Commissioned Partnership Programme in Support of the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Economic Analysis for Crime Reduction: What Works?

ABSTRACT

Economic analysis is important to inform the rational allocation of scarce resources. This applies to efforts to prevent crime as it does to any other area of expenditure. Good quality economic analysis in relation to crime prevention is rare. There are several forms of economy analysis. All require that interventions be comprehensively costed. A new, user-friendly on-line tool for costing crime prevention initiatives has been developed. A brief guide, as well as a more extended text, has been produced to inform the choice and conduct of economic analyses for crime reduction.

 
Andy Myhill  
Andy Myhill  

BIOGRAPHY Andy Myhill is an Evidence and Evaluation Advisor at the UK College of Policing. He has published both government reports and academic journal papers on topics including survey methodology, public attitudes to the police, and domestic violence. 

PRESENTATION TITLE 

What works for reducing domestic abuse: Risk-led policing and the DASH risk assessment tool 

ABSTRACT

The What Works Centre for Crime reduction funded a project to review how the DASH risk model for domestic abuse was operating in England and Wales. The research was undertaken in collaboration between Cardiff University, the College of Policing, and UCL. Following a scoping exercise, three police forces who implemented the DASH model in different ways were studied in-depth. Fieldwork comprised direct observations of frontline officers, in-depth interviews with police officers, staff and partners, a review of case file data, and a survey of police officers and staff. Key themes to emerge from the research were that a narrative of coercive control should be embedded in a risk-led approach; a shorter risk tool for frontline officers may be required to improve the consistency of data collected and to move them towards a greater focus on coercive control; a more thorough risk/needs assessment is best undertaken away from the frontline; and a systematic approach to police learning in relation to risk is desirable. Implications for future practice will be discussed.

 
Dr Paul Gill  
Dr Paul Gill  

BIOGRAPHY
Dr Paul Gill is a lecturer in Security and Crime Science. Previous to joining UCL, Dr Gill was a postdoctoral research fellow at the International Center for the Study of Terrorism at Pennsylvania State University. He has previously managed projects funded by the Office for Naval Research and the Department of Homeland Security. These projects focused upon various aspects of terrorist behavior including the nature of malevolent creativity, terrorist network structures, terrorist leaders and lone-actor terrorism.

His doctoral research focused on the underlying individual and organizational motivations behind suicide bombing. This piece of research won the Jean Blondel Prize for the best PhD thesis in Political Science in Europe for 2010.

Dr Gill holds a PhD in Political Science, an MA in International Relations, and a BSocSc(Int) from the School of Politics and International Relations in University College Dublin, Ireland.

CHAIR, Organised Crime Session

 
Klaus Von Lampe
 
Klaus von Lampe  

BIOGRAPHY

Klaus von Lampe is an associate professor in the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York where he directs the International Criminal Justice BA program. He graduated from the law and political science programs at Free University Berlin, Germany, and received his doctoral degree from Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Germany. His research is centered on the emergence and functioning of illegal markets, taking the illegal cigarette trade as a case study. Other research interests include drug trafficking, underworld power structures, strategic crime analysis, crime prevention and international policing. He is editor-in-chief of Trends in Organized Crime, co-editor of the Cross-border Crime Colloquium book series, and host of the Organized Crime Research website (www.organized-crime.de).

PRESENTATION TITLE

The European Refugee Crisis and Organized Crime: A critical assessment

ABSTRACT
The influx of large numbers of refugees has given rise to diffuse anxieties concerning internal security within the European Union. One recurring theme in the debate that has been unfolding is the assumed link between the refugee crisis and organized crime. The purpose of this presentation is twofold. First, it seeks to clarify what different scenarios such an assumed link may entail, drawing on a conceptual framework that distinguishes three basic dimensions of organized crime: illegal activities, criminal structures and extra-legal governance. Second, it provides some cautious comments on the cogency of these scenarios.

 
Chiara Galletti  
Chiara Galletti  
   

BIOGRAPHY

Chiara Galletti is Projects Manager for the Crime, Violence and Instability work stream that looks at the interaction of serious and organised crime with conflict and violence and its consequences on institutional fragility and security. Chiara has extensive experience in strengthening the participation and the voice of civil society in policy and legislative reform, in particular in the field of human rights, humanitarian law and natural resources management. 

Chiara Galletti worked between March 2009 and October 2012 as a Development Advisor for the European Union in Sudan and Pakistan, focussing specifically on human rights and rule of law programmes. In Pakistan she participated in the definition of a major programme aimed at empowering poor and vulnerable people in Punjab to better claim their legal rights and to improve legal systems for better provision of legal services and justice. The rationale behind the programme was to avoid radicalisation and marginalisation as a result of unfair and inadequate justice delivery. In Sudan she had oversight of two funding envelopes to support civil society in their peace-building efforts and in their struggle to address the root causes of conflict, from economic and political marginalisation to divisive societal organisation.

Chiara Galletti is a qualified lawyer as of November 2004, obtained a LLM in International Humanitarian Law from the University of Geneva in March 2004 and has practiced as a criminal lawyer for the Isolabella Law firm in Milano from January 2006 to November 2006.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Refugee Crisis and Opportunities for Organised crime: the victims’ perspective

ABSTRACT

International Alert has identified serious and organised crime as one of the biggest threats to peace worldwide and to date has carried out research that aims to unpack the complexities of illicit trafficking and economies and how these relate to power dynamics, peace and conflict in a number of different contexts. The underlying rationale is that organised crime undermines state consolidation, spoils peace processes and represents a major impairment to the promotion of peaceful societies.

We have identified the trafficking of human beings as one dimension of organised crime that, due to its profitability, could have significant and vicious impacts on conflict dynamics and violence.

The vulnerability created by insecurity and hostility, weak protection from government and relative mobility of populations in search of safety are factors that amplify trafficking and smuggling flows originating from or destined to conflict areas. Human smuggling and trafficking raise clear concerns in terms of respect of human rights, in particular of women and children, which exacerbates marginalisation and can fuel tension between host communities and refugees. Most governments treat these issues purely from a law enforcement point of view and entitlements to protection and legal remedies may become secondary.

As a peace building organisation International Alert is working to apply a peace building lens to the issue of organised crime, working to understand the root causes of violence and working with local actors to address them, for example by strengthening the resilience of vulnerable groups to criminal gangs and trafficking networks.

International Alert will present lessons learned from work with communities in Lebanon, Syria and Turkey, focusing on the perspectives of those vulnerable to the impact of criminal networks and reflecting on the merits of a holistic approach to resilience-building, encompassing psychosocial support, education and inter and intra-group dialogue.

 
Steve Welsh  
Steve Welsh  

CHAIR, CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION

BIOGRAPHY


Steve Welsh is a Senior Manager at the National Crime Agency (NCA) in the UK that was formed in the on 3rd October 2013, succeeding the Serious Organised Crime Agency to lead the UK’s fight to cut serious and organized crime.

Steve is the head of the Behavioural Science & Disruption department in Specialist Operations at Organised Crime Command in the NCA. This Behavioural Science & Disruption capability still constitutes relatively 'new business' for UK law enforcement. Steve’s work includes exploring how psychology and social science may be applied in designing and delivering innovative and proactive evidenced based interventions to disrupt and fragment organized crime networks and its remit includes cyber enabled serious crime.

Steve is also the Project Director for a two year EC ISEC funded international project known as Pol-PRIMETT II (police-private sector partnerships against metal theft) to combat metal theft in the EU by promoting effective partnership initiatives and the adoption of recognized good practice and innovation.

Steve was originally a police officer initially serving in the Metropolitan Police Service. In his 30 years in UK policing he served predominantly as a detective specialising in combating organised crime in proactive covert investigations.

Whilst a police officer Steve was one of the multi-agency team that produced the original National Intelligence Model for UK Law Enforcement. He also led for UK law enforcement in the Home Office project that planned and delivered UK adoption of cross border surveillance within the European Union.  He has represented the UK in EU expert sessions on the topic of international use of proactive covert tactics.

Steve concluded his police service as a Detective Superintendent with the National Crime Squad (NCS) before transferring in to SOCA in 2006 where he managed projects delivering non traditional and innovative responses to organized crime.

 
What Works
To register for both the conference and the workshop please follow this link (you will not need to register elsewhere to attend the conference)

Embedding evidence-based practice in policing: understanding common barriers and facilitators

EBP WORKSHOP at the 10th International Crime Science Conference

July 12th, British Library, London

What are the challenges to embedding evidence-based approaches in policing? How can these best be overcome? Are we making the most of existing opportunities to embed evidence-based approaches in policing?

The College of Policing is the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction (WWCCR), and since 2013 has been working with an academic consortium to develop a strong evidence base to inform decision-making around policing and crime reduction. The College is engaged in a range of activities to build capability and capacity of officers and staff across the service to understand and undertake evidence-based approaches.

One example of WWCCR activity to support the wider use of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP) was the development and piloting of a Police Development Programme by academic consortium partners. The development programme aimed to enable police officers to appraise and use evidence to inform their decision-making. The design and piloting of this programme enabled the officers and staff involved to share their experiences about the challenges and opportunities of implementing evidence based practice and evaluation in policing.

The workshop is spread over two sessions. Attendees must attend both sessions.

Session 1 - 11.00am to 12.45pm

Professor Nick Fyfe (Scottish Institute for Policing Research) and Levin Wheller (College of Policing) will introduce the findings from the pilot Police Development Programme (drawing on work by Fyfe, and Professor Jenny Fleming and Dr Jenni Wingrove at Southampton University) and outline other WWCCR activities which aim to build capability and capacity to undertake EBP across the service.

Session 2 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

Fyfe and Wheller will lead a discussion with attendees around how best to tackle identified barriers and make the most of facilitators to implementing EBP.

The aims of the workshop sessions are:

· To share key findings from the pilot Police Development Progamme;

· To highlight other WWCCR activities aiming to build capability & capacity for EBP across the service;

· To work with delegates to better identify and understand the nature of barriers and facilitators to implementing EBP approaches in police organisations;

· To work with delegates to identify approaches that could be used to best embed EBP in forces.

Who should attend?

This session will be of interest to all police officers and police staff with an interest in evidence-based policy and practice. Researchers who work with police organisations are also encouraged to attend.

Is there a charge to attend?

There is no charge for attendance to this workshop. Participants are invited to enjoy other sessions at the conference, lunch and the evening reception (Usual charge £199). 

Page last modified on 23 feb 16 11:41