International Crime Science Conference 2007

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SCIENCE, CRIME and SECURITY: making connections

Conference Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock
Programme Chair: Dr Herve Borrion

"This is a unique conference with a very special set of criteria for its success. Of course we want you to enjoy the remarkably wide selection of papers from experienced academics, practitioners and the private sector; but most importantly we also want you to connect--not within your sectors but between.

"We hope to see academics talking heatedly to practitioners; we hope to see business representatives hearing about the needs of our security services and then showing how they can be met; we hope to see exciting new research bids emerging from the discussions." Professor Gloria Laycock, former head of the UCL Department of Security and Crime Science

MONDAY 16 JULY 2007

10.00-10.15
Welcome from Professor Gloria Laycock
10.15-11.30 Opening session: Science, crime and security: making connections
 

Chair: Nick Ross

  • Current and future needs of the service

Peter Neyroud, chief executive of the National Policing Improvement Agency

  • Response

Professor Randal Richards, interim chief executive of the EPSRC; Jane Cannon, managing director of QinetiQ.

11.30-12.00 Coffee
12.00-13.00 Plenary: Future challenges in counter-terrorism
 

Chair: Nick Ross

  • UK: Ken Brigden, MOD CT Centre
  • US: Dr Starnes Walker, US Department of Homeland Security
13.00-14.00 Lunch
14.00-15.00 PARALLEL SESSIONS
 

Emerging technologies

  • Laser surface authentication: using lasers to control crime. Professor Russell Cowburn, Imperial College
  • Hologram technology and crime control. Professor Chris Lowe, University of Cambridge
 

Biometrics: interfacing with the  public

  • Can older adults use biometric fingerprint systems? Professor Pamela Briggs, Northumbria University
  • Biometry and forensic sciences: same quest for identification? Patrick Perror, Gendarmerie Nationale, France
  • EigenFIT: facial composite construction through knowledge integration. Dr Christopher Solomon, University of Kent
  • Evolutionary morphing of facial images for aging simulation. Dr Darren Cosker, University of Wales Swansea
  • Latent fingerprint visualisation on fired cartridge cases using scanning Kelvin probe technology. Professor Neil McMurray, University of Wales Swansea
 

Counter terrorism: simulation and modelling

  • Mass vulnerabilities in 3D tactics. Dr Chris Flaherty, Sinclair Knight Merz, Australia
  • The use of 3D-city models for the detection of urban vulnerable structures. Markus Wolff, University of Potsdam, Germany
  • Working with business on the protection of crowded places. Dt Ch Insp Chris Philips, NaCTSO
15.30-16.00 Coffee
16.00-17.00 PARALLEL SESSIONS
 

Biometrics

  • Biometric sciences for security and crime reduction. Dr Valorie Valencia, Authenti-Corp, US
 

Designing out crime

  • Striking sparks: crime technology and design. Professor Paul Ekblom, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design; and Aiden Sidebottom, UCL
  • The deterrent effect of 23 anti-theft design factors relating to mobile phones. Jen Mailley, Loughborough University, UK
  • Don't give thieves an easy ride: a design against crime practice review. Adam Thorpe, Director of Bikeoff Research Initiative, UK
  • Design against crime as a socially responsive innovation? Professor Lorraine Gamman, Central St Martins College of Art and Design
 

Counter terrorism

  • What lessons were learned from 7/7? Andrew Clancy, Metropolitan Police
17.10-17.50 Practical applications
 
  • Mobile phone forensics: impossible evidence. Hans Taylor, Forensic Telecommunications Services
  • How organised is organised crime? Jerry Hart, i2
17.50-18.20 Plenary: What is so great about science?
  Dr Hasok Chang, UCL
18.30 Drinks reception and canapés
TUESDAY 17 JULY 2007
08.45-09.00 Registration and coffee
9.00-10.30 Plenary: securing public events
 

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock

  • Peter Ryan, security consultant to the 2012 Olympics; Alphus Hinds, UN IPO advisor on major events security; Supt Ellie Bird, British Transport Police
10.30-11.00
Coffee
11.00-12.30
PARALLEL SESSIONS
 

Forensic science: changing forensic science

  • Shaping the future of forensic science. Professor Julie Mennell, Northumbria University
  • Measuring the contribution of forensic science to policing. Ian Shaw, Northumbria University
  • Contribution of footwear mark intelligence and evidence to crime investigation. Zale Johnson and Iain Wilson, National Policing Improvement Agency
 

Surveillance: theoretical and practical approaches

  • Surveillance and crime theory: a framework for the deployment of new technology. Professor Alex Hirschfield, University of Huddersfield
  • The complexity of video visualisation. Ralf Botchen, University of Stuttgart
  • Multi-camera calibration and event recognition. Dr Andrea Cavallaro, Queen Mary University of London
  • Analysis of applications and reliability of voice as a security biometric. Farbod Hosseyndoost, University of Huddersfield
 

Soil forensics: innovations in mapping and non-invasive data for criminal investigations

  • Effect of soil grain size on the geophysical response of graves: clay versus silt versus sand. David Nobes, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • The role of ground penetrating radar in forensic science. Patrick Perrot, Gendarmarie Nationale, France
  • Mapping of forensic case data. Rebecca Bucht, Graduate Centre of CUNY
 

Security and business

  • How to fund my idea and enter the marketplace. Richard Leaver, Pegasus Bridge Fund; Alan Watkins, Chronicle Solutions; Mark McGlade, Ingenia Technology; Professor Keith Willey, London Business School
12.30-13.30 Lunch
 13.25-14.45 PARALLEL SESSIONS
 

Surveillance: exploiting surveillance data

  • Imagery library for intelligent detection systems: future development of i-LIDS. Keith Hughes, Home Office
  • Learning activities from video: preliminary results using the i-LIDS abandoned package detection dataset. Dr Hannah Dee, University of Leeds
  • ANPR and policing: the role of automatic numberplate recognition systems in crime investigation. Alina Haines, University of Huddersfield
  • Bicycle theft detection: a linkage and re-identification task. Dima Damen, University of Leeds
 

Forensic science: developments

  • Maximising the benefits of forensic science in volume crime investigation. Dt Sgt Martin O'Farrell, West Yorkshire Police
  • Lab-on-a-chip for forensic measurements. Professor Zulfiqur Ali, University of Teeside
  • The psychology of crime analysis. Callum Sutherland, Forensic Science Society
 

Soil forensics: integrated databases and end-user needs for physical evidence

  • Meeting the user requirement: a case history. Professor Dave Barclay, Robert Gordon University
  • Developing integrated geographic soils data and analysis for crime investigation. Professor David Miller, Macaulay Institute

Future needs for security

  • A grassroots perspective on public space. Dt Insp Brian Howar, British Transport Police; Dt Sgt Richard Flynn, Centre for the the Protection of National Infrastructure
15.00-15.30 Coffee
15..30-16.30
Closing session: the application of science to security - finding an ethical balance
 

Chair: Nick Ross

  • Professor Gloria Laycock, EPSRC  Societal Issues Panel member; Tony Lake, ACPO lead in forensic science; Professor Steve Bain, member of the National DNA Database Strategy Board


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