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Sensory-perceptual ethnomusicology, neurodiversity and learning style

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm, 22 February 2019

Girl in Mozambique, credit: Robbie Campbell

This presentation explores children's learning processes learning Timbila xylophone music.

Event Information

Open to

All

Organiser

David Baker

Location

Room 828
UCL Institute of Education
20 Bedford Way
London
WC1H 0AL
United Kingdom

Timbila xylophone music is the most famous cultural product of the Chopi people in southern Mozambique.

During full 'ngodo' performances, up to 20 musicians play in rapid and tightly-coordinated improvised phrase-cycles, all accompanied by song and choreographed dance. Elder timbila masters lead these community groups, compose material and are largely responsible for creating the environment within which children and young adults learn and develop.

This presentation explores children's learning processes. Timbila music is "caught and not taught": formal instruction is introduced around age 9. 

This event is free and open for all to attend, no booking is required.

Links

Image

  • Robbie Campbell

About the Speaker

Robbie Campbell

at School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

Robbie Campbell is a PhD music student at SOAS researching the relationships between Chopi timbila xylophone music in Mozambique and dyslexia.