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The Mysteries of the Ark of the Covenant

30 November 2021, 6:00 pm–7:30 pm

Painting of Die Überführung der Bundeslade durch den singenden und tanzenden König David

Thomas Römer (Collège de France) on the importance of the Ark (of God, of Yhwh, of the Covenant) in the Hebrew Bible and more specifically on the so-called Ark narrative in the books of Samuel.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All | UCL staff | UCL students | UCL alumni

Availability

Yes

Cost

Free

Organiser

Institute of Jewish Studies

Location

Zoom
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The lecture will focus on the importance of the Ark (of God, of Yhwh, of the Covenant) in the Hebrew Bible and more specifically on the so-called Ark narrative in the books of Samuel. What was the purpose of the Ark, what did it originally contain? If the original Ark narrative ended with the transfer of the Ark to Kiriath Jearim in 1 Sam 7:1 as will be argued, what is the importance of this site? The lecture will then bring into conversation exegetical observations and the results of the excavations at Kiriath Jearim from 2017 and 2019, organized by the University of Tel Aviv and the Collège de France. The lecture will conclude with the question of the fate of the Ark after the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 587 BCE.

About the Speaker

Prof Thomas Römer

The Hebrew Bible and its contexts chair) at Collège de France

Professor Thomas Christian Römer is professor and chair of the Collège de France and currently its President; he is Professor emeritus of the University of Lausanne, where he taught from 1993 to 2020. He holds also a Doctorate h. c. of the University of Tel Aviv (2015) and is associate Professor of the University of Pretoria. In 2018 he was made Chevalier de la Legion d’honneur.

His current research covers the Formation of the Torah, the question of the So-called Deuteronomistic History and its Social and Historical Setting, and the relation between the literary and archaeological approaches to the Hebrew Bible. He is co-director with Israel Finkelstein and Christophe Nicolle of the excavation in Kiriath Jearim (Israel). He is one of the main editors of the Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception and chief editor of the collection “Ancient Israel and Its Literature” (SBL, Atlanta).

More about Prof Thomas Römer