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Quality Improvement

 

UCL Global Quality Improvement brings together a team of expert researchers, evaluators and practitioners from across UCL who are interested in improving global healthcare and health, particularly in low-income countries and resource-poor settings throughout the world. Our unique approach to quality improvement is founded on five core principles:

1. Whole systems thinking. The inter-relationships between the patient, clinical and non-clinical workers in the health system, different levels of the health system ranging from the community to tertiary referral systems, and required human and material resources and training, supervision and management structures are all considered as part of one dynamic complex adaptive system.

2. Accountability. The people involved in making health systems work must be accountable to the individuals and local communities the health system is there to benefit. Data for decision-making is key as it not only can be used to encourage quality improvement and track it, but can also be a mechanism by which service providers can be held to account. Community-linked death reviews involving the community of the deceased as well as healthcare workers can also increase accountability.

3. Participatory approach. We believe a participatory, grounded and bottom-up approaches involving healthcare professionals, patients and wider communities as well as researchers-in-residence are crucial to understand whole systems, increase buy-in to quality improvement efforts, and consequently design and implement interventions that are effective in specific contexts; and build accountability.

4. Evidence-based. Evidence on what works to improve quality of care in low-income settings is scarce. Our approach is based on the highest standards of scientific and academic rigor, using innovative mixed methods approaches to research and evaluation.

5. Innovation. With expertise in a variety of research and evaluation methodologies related to quality improvement we aim to effectively use both plausibility and probability designs as part of a single research strategy to rigorously determine not only whether the interventions we test work but also how, why and in what circumstances they work. We use methods ranging from tailored formative research to cluster randomised controlled trials with accompanying detailed multidisciplinary theory-based evaluations, and encourage the use of researchers-in-residence.
 

Meet the team

tim-colbourn

Dr Tim Colbourn

Lecturer in Global Health Epidemiology & Evaluation 
UCL Institute for Global Health
 


Tim specialises in evaluation of quality improvement approaches, using methodologies including randomised trials, process evaluation, realist evaluation and economic evaluation. He was one of the evaluators of the MaiKhanda quality improvement trial in Malawi and is focused on improving quality of maternal and newborn care both at community and health facility levels in low-income settings throughout the world. Tim strongly believes in the UCL approach of ensuring local and global institutional buy-in to quality improvement approaches.

Relevant publications

Effects of quality improvement in health facilities and community mobilization through women's groups on maternal, neonatal and perinatal mortality in three districts of Malawi: MaiKhanda, a cluster randomized controlled effectiveness trial

Colbourn T, Nambiar B, Bondo A, Makwenda C, Tsetekani E, Makonda-Ridley A, Msukwa M, Barker P, Kotagal U, Williams C, Davies R, Webb D, Flatman D, Lewycka S, Rosato M, Kachale F, Mwansambo C, Costello A.

International Health 2013; 5: 180-195

MaiKhanda - final evaluation report. The impact of quality improvement at health facilities and community mobilisation by women's groups on birth outcomes: and effectiveness study in three districts of Malawi.

Colbourn T, Nambiar B, Costello A.

Peer-reviewed technical report pp.1-364. UCL Institute of Child Health; The Health Foundation, London, 2013

Cost-effectiveness and affordability of community mobilisation through women's groups and quality improvement in health facilities (MaiKhanda trial) in Malawi

Colbourn T, Pulkki-Brännström A-M, Nambiar B, Kim S, Bondo A, Lumbani B, MakwendaC, Batura N, Haghparast-Bidgoli H, Hunter R, Costello A, Baio G, Skordis-Worrall J

Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation 2015;13:1

Ongoing relevant work

MOMI: Missed Opportunities in Mother and Infant Health - Reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity in the year after childbirth through combined facility and community-based intervention. Feb 2011 to Jan 2016 - publications forthcoming in 2016.

Relevant teaching

Evaluating Interventions - short course and Master's module


 

bejoy-nambiar

Dr Bejoy Nambiar

Research Associate
UCL Institute for Global Health


Bejoy is the systems improvement researcher working towards improving the quality of maternal, newborn and child health. He has been based in Malawi for the past 8 years, evaluating various quality improvement projects. He has been experimenting with a wide range of research methods including randomised trials for measuring impact and theory based evaluation to understand intervention mechanisms. He believes that a whole systems approach is needed to achieve quality improvement especially in resource poor settings. This presents a challenge for evaluation as well as an opportunity. 

Relevant publications


Effects of quality improvement in health facilities and community mobilization through women's groups on maternal, neonatal and perinatal mortality in three districts of Malawi: MaiKhanda, a cluster randomized controlled effectiveness trial

Colbourn T, Nambiar B, Bondo A, Makwenda C, Tsetekani E, Makonda-Ridley A, Msukwa M, Barker P, Kotagal U, Williams C, Davies R, Webb D, Flatman D, Lewycka S, Rosato M, Kachale F, Mwansambo C, Costello A.

International Health 2013; 5: 180-195

MaiKhanda - final evaluation report. The impact of quality improvement at health facilities and community mobilisation by women's groups on birth outcomes: and effectiveness study in three districts of Malawi.

Colbourn T, Nambiar B, Costello A.

Peer-reviewed technical report pp.1-364. UCL Institute of Child Health; The Health Foundation, London, 2013

Cost-effectiveness and affordability of community mobilisation through women's groups and quality improvement in health facilities (MaiKhanda trial) in Malawi

Colbourn T, Pulkki-Brännström A-M, Nambiar B, Kim S, Bondo A, Lumbani B, Makwenda C, Batura N, Haghparast-Bidgoli H, Hunter R, Costello A, Baio G, Skordis-Worrall J

Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation 2015;13:1

Ongoing relevant work

MOMI: Missed Opportunities in Mother and Infant Health - Reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity in the year after childbirth through combined facility and community-based intervention. Feb 2011 to Jan 2016 - publications forthcoming in 2016.


 

 

 

 

dougal-hargreaves

Dr Dougal Hargreaves

Honorary Consultant Paediatrician
University College Hospital

Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellow
UCL Institute of Child Health


Dougal's current research focus is using data on geographical variation in child health outcomes and paediatric care activity within the UK to guide national and local quality improvement strategies.

 

Relevant publications

Journal articles

1. Hargreaves DS, Elliott MN, Viner RM, Richmond TK, Schuster MA. Unmet Healthcare Need in US Adolescents and Adult Health Outcomes. Pediatrics published online: 2015 August 17 (doi: 10.1542/peds.2015.0237)

2. Hargreaves DS, Greaves FE, Levay CE et al. Comparison of healthcare experience and access between young and older adults in 11 high-income countries. J Adolesc Health. 2015 July 20 (doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.05.015).

3. Hargreaves DS. Learning to listen: delivering patient-centered care for adolescents. J Adolesc Health  2014 October Volume 55, Issue 4, Pages 463-464

4.  Bensted R, Hargreaves DS, Lombard JC, Kilkelly U, Viner RM. Comparison of healthcare priorities in childhood and early/late adolescence: analysis of cross-sectional data from 8 countries in the Council of Europe Child-friendly Healthcare Survey, 2011. Child Care Health Dev. 2014 Jun 25. doi: 10.1111/cch.12169. [Epub ahead of print]

5. Viner RM, Hargreaves DS, Coffey C, Patton GC, Wolfe I. Deaths in young people aged 0-24 years in the UK compared with the EU15+ countries, 1970-2008: analysis of the WHO Mortality Database. Lancet. 2014 Sept 6;384(9946):880-892 
 

 

Book Chapter

Hargreaves DS, Wunder K, Viner RM, Santelli J. The Health of the World's Adolescents and Young Adults. In Neinstein's Textbook of Adolescent and Young Adult Health, 6th edition. (In press)

For full list of publications, please see IRIS

Previous experience

o Two year post as Clinical Advisory to the Chief Medical Officer in England (2006/8)

o Establishing and leading a post-earthquake relief project in Pakistan, with Medecins Sans Frontieres (2005/6)

o Leading a fifteen month quality improvement project for child health services in a remote area of Turkmenistan, with Medecins Sans Frontieres (2004-5)

o Trainer in recognition and management of the acutely sick child, Bihac, Western Bosnia (2002)

o Harkness Fellowship in Healthcare Policy and Practice, Harvard Medical School (2013/4) 


 

martin-marshall

Prof Martin Marshall

Professor of Healthcare Improvement
 


Martin Marshall is Professor of Healthcare Improvement at UCL, lead for Improvement Science London and general practitioner serving a diverse socio-demographically deprived community in East London. His main interests are in the fields of improvement science, knowledge mobilisation, health system organisation and redesign (particularly in primary care), quality improvement and comparative health system analysis. He now spends most of his time working at the interface between academia and practice. In the past he has held senior roles in government and in the charitable sector and he has extensive experience as an advisor and consultant in the field of quality improvement in Europe, North America and Australasia.
 

Relevant publications

Marshall M. A Precious Jewel; The Role of General Practice in the English NHS. N Engl J Med 2015; 372:893-897

Marshall M, Pagel C, French C, Utley M, Allwood D, Fulop N, Pope C, Banks V, Goldmann A. Moving improvement research closer to practice: the Researcher-in-Residence model. BMJ Quality and Safety 2014; doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2013-002779

Marshall M, Mountford J, Gamet K, Gungor G, Burke C, Hudson R, Morris S, Patel N, Koczan P, Meaker R, Chantler C, and Roberts M. Understanding quality improvement at scale in general practice; a qualitative evaluation of a COPD improvement programme. Br J Gen Pract, 2014, 64 (629) e745-e751; DOI: 10.3399/bjgp14X682801

Marshall M, Pronovost P, Dixon Woods M. Promotion of improvement as a science. The Lancet, 2013;381(9864), 419-421

Marshall M. Bridging the ivory towers and the swampy lowlands; increasing the impact of health services research. International Journal for Quality Improvement in Healthcare. 2013; doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzt076

Marshall M, Ovretveit J. Is it possible to improve quality and save money? BMJ Quality and Safety 2011;20:293-296

Marshall M, Bibby J. Shared decision making. BMJ 2011; 342: doi:10.1136

Marshall M, McLoughlin V. How do patients use information on healthcare providers? BMJ 2010;341:c5272 p1255-1257


Monica Lakhanpaul

Prof Monica Lakhanpaul

Programme Director for the Children and Young People's theme for UCL Partners' Academic Health Science Network
Deputy Theme Lead for the children and young people's North Thames CLAHRC
Head of the Population, Policy, Practice Program, Institute of Child Health
Professor of Integrated Community Child Health 
Honorary Consultant Community Paediatrician, Whittington Health
 


Monica's overall vision and passion is to work across traditional boundaries putting children and their families at the centre of healthcare. Monica's research focuses on reducing variation in practice and improving outcomes for children by utilising an integrated applied health research approach to collaboratively design and deliver tailored interventions to address suboptimal care across the patient pathway thereby crossing primary, community and hospital care, social care and education.

 
Relevant publications

Khanna R, Lakhanpaul M, Burman-Roy S, Murphy MS; Guideline Development Group and the technical team. 'Diarrhoea and vomiting caused by gastroenteritis in children under 5 years: summary of NICE guidance.' BMJ. 2009 Apr 22;338:b1350. doi: 10.1136/bmj.b1350.

Saperia J, Lakhanpaul M, Kemp A, Glaser D; Guideline Development Group and Technical Team. 'When to suspect child maltreatment: summary of NICE guidance.' BMJ. 2009 Jul 22;339:b2689. doi: 10.1136/bmj.b2689.

Lakhanpaul M, MacFaul R, Werneke U, Armon K, Heminway P, Stephenson T. 'An evidence-based guideline for children presenting with acute breathing difficulty.' Emerg med J. 2009. Dec; 26 (12):850-3

Brent A, Lakhanpaul M, Ninis N, Levin M, MacFaul R, Thompson M. 'Evaluation of temperature-pulse centile charts in identifying serious bacterial illness: observational cohort study.'  Archives of Diseases in Childhood; PMID: 21233079, 2011.

Wahl H, Banerjee J, Manikam L, Parylo C, Lakhanpaul M.,  'Questionnaire survey to identify the health information needs of families attending the paediatric emergency department'. Archives of Diseases in Childhood; 2011, Apr; 96 (4): Epub 2011 Jan 10.

Maguire S, Ranmal R, Komulainen S, Pearse S, Maconochie I, Lakhanpaul M, Davies F, Kai J, Stephenson T. 'Which urgent care services do febrile children use and why?' Archive of Diseases in Childhood; 2011 Jun 3 (Epub ahead of print).

Wallace E, Smith S, Perera-Salazar R, Vaucher P, McCowan C, Collins G, Verbakel J, Lakhanpaul M, Fahey T. 'Framework for the impact analysis and implementation of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs).' BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making; 2011, 11:62.

Manikam L, Bannerjee J, Blackwell N, Lakhanpaul M. 'Barriers to Incorporating NICE Clinical Practice Guidelines in Medical Education: The Medical Student's Perspective.' Medical Science Educator 2011; 21(4).

Roland D, Wahl H, Lakhanpaul M, Blackwell N, Davies F.  Education by Video.  BMJ Careers Feb 2011.

Fitzgerald A, Mori R, Lakhanpaul M.  'Interventions for covert bacteriuria in children'.  Cochrane Library 2012; Issue 2.

Thompson, M, Lakhanpaul M, et al. 'Systematic review and validation of prediction rules for identifying children with serious infections in emergency departments and urgent-access primary care.' Health Technology Assessment; 2012; Vol. 16: No. 15 ISSN 1366-5278

Bird D, Culley L, Lakhanpaul M. 'Why collaborate with children in health research: an analysis of the risks and benefits of collaboration with children.' Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed. 2013 Jan 8. [Epub ahead of print]

Manikam L, Blackwell N, Banerjee J, Nightingale P, Lakhanpaul M. 'Improving assessment of paediatric acute breathing difficulties in medical education: a cluster randomized controlled trial'. Acta Paediatrica, 2013, doi: 10.1111/apa.12187 [Epub ahead of print]

Verbakel JY, Van den Bruel A, Thompson M, Stevens R, Aertgeerts B, Oostenbrink R, Moll HA, Berger MY, Lakhanpaul M, Mant D, Buntinx F; European Research Network on Recognising Serious Infection (ERNIE). 'How well do clinical prediction rules perform in identifying serious infections in acutely ill children across an international network of ambulatory care datasets?' BMC Med. 2013 Jan 15; 11:10. Doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-11-10.

Culley L, Hudson N, Baldwin K, Lakhanpaul M. 'Children travelling for treatment: what we don't know.' Arch Dis Child. 2013 Jun; 98(6):442-4. Doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-303189.

Roland D, Jones C, Neill S, Thompson M, Lakhanpaul M. 'Safety netting in healthcare settings: what it means, and for whom'. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed. 2013 Oct 28. Doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-303056.

Jones CH, Neill S, Lakhanpaul M, Roland D, Singlehurst-Mooney H, Thompson M. 'Information needs of parents for acute childhood illness: determining 'what, how, where and when' of safety netting using a qualitative exploration with parents and clinicians.' BMJ Open 2014 Jan 14;4(1): e003874. Doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003874.

Kerkhof E, Lakhanpaul M, Ray S, Verbakel JY, Van den Bruel A, Thompson M, Berger MY, Moll HA, Oostenbrink R; European Research Network on recognising serious Infections (ERNIE) members.  The predictive value of the NICE "red traffic lights" in acutely ill children.

PLoS One. 2014 Mar 14;9(3):e90847. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090847. eCollection 2014.

Lakhanpaul M, Bird D, Manikam L, Culley L, Perkins G, Hudson N, Wilson J, Johnson M.  A systematic review of explanatory factors of barriers and facilitators to improving asthma management in South Asian children. BMC Public Health. 2014 Apr 27;14:403. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-403.

Schang L, De Poli C, Airoldi M, Morton A, Bohm N, Lakhanpaul M, Schilder A, Bevan G.  Using an epidemiological model to investigate unwarranted variation: the case of ventilation tubes for otitis media with effusion in England. J Health Serv Res Policy. 2014 Oct;19(4):236-44. doi: 10.1177/1355819614536886. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Neill SJ, Jones CH, Lakhanpaul M, Roland DT, Thompson MJ.  Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

J Child Health Care. 2014 Oct 8. pii: 1367493514551309.

Neill SJ, Jones CH, Lakhanpaul M, Roland DT, Thompson MJ; the ASK SNIFF research team.  Parent's information seeking in acute childhood illness: what helps and what hinders decision making?  Health Expect. 2014 Oct 20. doi: 10.1111/hex.12289.

Lakhanpaul M, Bird D, Culley L, Hudson N, Robertson N, Johal N, M. McFeeters, Hamlyn Williams, C. MRD Johnson. The use of a collaborative structured methodology for the development of a multifaceted intervention programme for the management of asthma (MIA), tailored to the needs of children and families of South Asian origin. Health Serv Deliv Res 2014;2(28)

 

Roland D, Matheson D, Taub N, Coats T, Lakhanpaul M.  Is perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases?  BMC Med Educ. 2015 Aug 13;15:132. doi: 10.1186/s12909-015-0419-x.


Michelle Heys

Dr Michelle Heys

NIHR Clinical Lecturer in Child Public Health and Global Health Epidemiology
UCL Institute for Global Health
 


Michelle is a paediatrician and a paediatric epidemiologist with a passion for delivery of high quality care both at the individual and system level. Her research interests are life course epidemiology of cognition and cardiovascular risk and health service configuration and evaluation for newborn babies, children and young people. Along with colleagues at IGH, she is developing a project to improve outcomes for newborns born in hospital facilities in Bangladesh and Malawi. She has led initial work in rural Nepal examining the unmet health and education needs of children and young people with atypical child development including autism and ADHD.

Relevant publications

Fu I, Fong D, Heys M, Lee I, Sham A, Tarrant M. Professional breastfeeding support for first-time mothers: a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2014 May 26. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.12884. PubMed PMID: 24861802.

Heys, M., Kwong, H-M., Reed, J., Blair, M. What do we really know about infants who attend accident and emergency departments?" Perspectives in Public Health 2013 Dec 12. PMID: 24336511

Heys M., Lin SL, Lam TH, Leung GM, Schooling CM. Lifetime Growth and Blood Pressure in Adolescence: Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" Birth Cohort. Pediatrics. 2013 Jan;131(1):e62-72. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0574. PMID:23230068

Selected peer reviewed abstracts (publications in progress for 2016):

Heys, M., Manandhar,DS., Osrin, D., Tumbahangphe, KM., Sen, A., Shrestha, B., Shrestha, DK., Adhikari, RK., Budhathoki, B., Costello, A. G248  Long term survival of children from a cluster randomised controlled trial of women's participatory groups in Makwanpur district, Nepal. Archives of Disease in Childhood 100 (Suppl 3), A104-A104

Kesler, E., Costello, A. Heys, M. Azad, K. G259 (P) A systematic review of health worker-led interventions to reduce mortality in low birth weight neonates in low and middle-income institutional settings. Archives of Disease in Childhood 100 (Suppl 3), A112-A113

Alexander, A., Pellicano,L., Medeiros, E., Tumbahangphe, KM., Gibbons, F., Wickenden, M.,Shrestha, M., Costello, A., Heys, M., Manandhar, DS.. G256 (P) Understanding parents' and professionals' knowledge and awareness of autism in Nepal Archives of Disease in Childhood 100 (Suppl 3), A110-A110

Sikorski, C. Lakhanpaul, M., Costello, A., Heys, M. British Association for Child and Adolescent Public Health: G477(P) A systematic review: "Can participatory action learning methods improve health outcomes in high-income countries? Arch Dis Child 2014;99:Suppl 1A197-A198 Published Online First:7 April 2014 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2014-306237.457

Heys, M., Rajan, M., Blair, M. British Association for Child and Adolescent Public HealthG478: (P) Socio-economic position, service configuration and length of inpatient stay for paediatrics: what matters? Arch Dis Child 2014;99:Suppl 1A198-A199 Published Online First:7 April 2014 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2014-306237.458

Sikorski,C., Lakhanpaul, M., Costello, M., Heys M. British Association for Child and Adolescent Public Health: G479(P) A systematic review: 'Can postnatal women's groups improve health outcomes for women and children in high-income countries? Arch Dis Child 2014;99:Suppl. 1 A200 Published Online First: 7 April 2014 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2014-306237.459

Heys, M., Blair, M. Child Public Health Interest Group: Who are the "frequent flyers" in paediatric A and E? A study of two large district general hospitals in London, UK. Arch Dis Child 2012;97:Suppl 1 A183 doi:10.1136/archdischild-2012-301885.429

For full list of publications please see: https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=MHEYS25

Relevant teaching

PICH: Michelle is a Paediatric Integrated Child Health (PICH, London) mentor for a London wide program that looks to train primary and secondary care physicians in the development, evaluation and implementation of Quality Improvement projects to improve outcomes for children and young people.


 

Christina Pagel

Dr Christina Pagel

Reader in Operational Research
UCL Clinical Operational Research Unit & Department of Applied Health Research
 


Christina has a background in both mathematics and physics and has been working in Operational Research applied to health care since 2005. Her main interest is in using information to help people within health services make better decisions. Often this will involve mathematical modelling or other Operational Research techniques, but sometimes it can be just presenting the data in a more intuitive way. She wants her work to be relevant to, and used by, those working within the health services and so she is also very interested in the process of how to get theoretical knowledge into practical application. She has been an embedded researcher at Great Ormond Street Hospital Intensive Care Unit since 2013, spending 2 days a week there.

Relevant publications

Pagel, C., Ramnarayan, P., Ray, S., & Peters, M. J. (2015). A Novel Method to Identify the Start and End of the Winter Surge in Demand for Pediatric Intensive Care in Real Time. Pediatr Crit Care Med, 16 (9), 821-827. doi:10.1097/PCC.0000000000000540

Crowe, S., Prost, A., Hossen, M., Azad, K., Kuddus, A., Roy, S., . . . Pagel, C. (2015). Generating insights from trends in newborn care practices from prospective population-based studies: Examples from India, Bangladesh and Nepal. PLoS ONE, 10 (7). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127893

Pagel, C., Prost, A., Hossen, M., Azad, K., Kuddus, A., Roy, S. S., . . . Crowe, S. (2014). Is essential newborn care provided by institutions and after home births? Analysis of prospective data from community trials in rural South Asia. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 14, 99-?. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-14-99

Jensen, H. A., Brown, K. L., Pagel, C., Barron, D. J., & Franklin, R. C. (2014). Mortality as a measure of quality of care in infants with congenital cardiovascular malformations following surgery. Br Med Bull, 111 (1), 5-15. doi:10.1093/bmb/ldu014

Marshall, M., Pagel, C., French, C., Utley, M., Allwood, D., Fulop, N., . . . Goldmann, A. (2014). Moving improvement research closer to practice: the Researcher-in-Residence model. BMJ Qual Saf, 23 (10), 801-805. doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2013-002779

Pagel, C., Crowe, S., Brown, K., & Utley, M. (2014). The benefits and risks of risk-adjustment in paediatric cardiac surgery.Heart, 100 (7), 528-529. doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-304848

Pagel, C., Utley, M., Crowe, S., Witter, T., Anderson, D., Samson, R., . . . Brown, K. (2013). Real time monitoring of risk-adjusted paediatric cardiac surgery outcomes using variable life-adjusted display: Implementation in three UK centres. Heart, 99 (19), 1445-1450. doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-303671

Skordis-Worrall, J., Pulkki-Brännström, A. -. M., Utley, M., Kembhavi, G., Bricki, N., Dutoit, X., . . . Pagel, C. (2012). Development and formative evaluation of a visual e-tool to help decision makers navigate the evidence around health financing. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 (6). doi:10.2196/resprot.2173

Crowe, S., Utley, M., Costello, A., & Pagel, C. (2012). How many births in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia will not be attended by a skilled birth attendant between 2011 and 2015?. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 12, 4-?. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-12-4

Vasilakis, C., Pagel, C., Gallivan, S., Richards, D., Weaver, A., & Utley, M. (2012). Modelling toolkit to assist with introducing a stepped care system design in mental health care. Journal of the Operational Research Society. doi:10.1057/jors.2012.98

Pagel, C., Prost, A., Nair, N., Tripathy, P., Costello, A., & Utley, M. (2012). Monitoring mortality trends in low-resource settings.Bull World Health Organ, 90 (6), 474-476. doi:10.2471/BLT.11.092981

Pagel, C., Utley, M., Kembhavi, G., Brikci, N., Pulkki-Brannstrom, A., Dutoit, X., & Skordis-Worral, J. (2011). Helping decision makers navigate the evidence around health financing.http://www.haciric.org/static/doc/events/HaCIRIC_11_conference_proceedin..., 213-223. HaCIRIC.

 


susana frazao pinheiro

Dr Susana Frazao Pinheiro

Programme Director, Healthcare Management 
UCL School of Management
 


Susana has worked with the UN and Ministries of Health on the development of national health strategic, and monitoring and evaluation plans for almost a decade, as well as in emergency situations. She was a postdoctoral fellow on a clinical trial for an HIV vaccine at Oxford. Her passion to find solutions to improving access to quality healthcare has led her to work with both communities and senior health professionals in countries such as Angola, Haiti, Guinea-Bissau, The Gambia, Mozambique. Susana has conducted research in the UK, Portugal, USA.

 

Relevant work/publications

Implementing the National Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation for HIV/AIDS 2011-2014. Ministry of Health, Angola and UNAIDS. 2011Workshop Report. UNAIDS. 2012

One Comprehensive M&E Plan: National Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation for HIV/AIDS 2011-2014. M&E Framework. Ministry of Health, Angola and UNAIDS. 2011

Integrating HIV in a humanitarian context in Angola. Workshop Report. UNAIDS. 2011.

Frazao Pinheiro, S. Final evaluation of the 5-year Global Fund Grant "Reducing the burden of HIV/AIDS in Angola 2005-2010. Global Fund/ UNDP. 2011

Frazao Pinheiro S. Mainstreaming HIV in Early Recovery. Workshop Report and Facilitators Guide. Bureau for Development Policy. UNDP. Geneva. 2010

AIDS Accountability Scorecard on Women. AIDS Accountability International.  2010

Early Recovery Practitioners Guide and Workshop Report. Mainstreaming HIV/AIDS in Early Recovery. UNDP. Geneva. 2009

Integrating HIV/AIDS in Early Recovery. Module. CWGER/ UNDP. Geneva. 2009 

Relevant teaching

 

  • Health systems policy and financing
  • Contemporary Topics in Healthcare Management
  • SSS in Medical Policy and Management (UCL Medical School)

 

 


Felicity

Dr Felicity Fitzgerald


Felicity is a paediatric infectious diseases trainee, who asked her PhD supervisor for 5 weeks out to volunteer working clinically in the West African Ebola response. She returned 7 months later having set up the largest and most comprehensive paediatric cohort study to emerge from the outbreak to date, working with Sierra Leonean colleagues and support from Save the Children and LSHTM. This followed up children from their first attendance and testing at health care facilities, to transfer to specialist treatment centres and post-discharge. She has learnt many lessons about trying to perform research in an outbreak setting, with a backdrop of fragile health infrastructure and high background morbidity and mortality. She hopes to put these experiences to good use in the future, working on how best to incorporate research and data collection into an emergency response, and was recently invited to speak at LSHTM's Centre of Evaluation's symposium on "Evaluating the Ebola Response". More broadly, she is interested in building on her PhD expertise in bacterial molecular diagnostics to design safe and effective treatment pathways for children presenting with signs of infection in resource limited settings. She is committed to pragmatic and participatory operational research in developing settings with the aim of improving paediatric care sustainably.

Relevant publications

Fitzgerald F, Naveed A, Wing K. et al.,

Ebola Virus Disease in children in Sierra Leone: a retrospective cohort study

In draft

Fitzgerald F., Awonuga W., Shah T., Youkee D.

Ebola Response in Sierra Leone: the impact on children

Journal of Infection, Under Review

Contributor to „Clinical Management of Patients in the Ebola Treatment Centres and other care centres in Sierra Leone: A Pocket Guide Interim emergency guidelines- Sierra Leone. World Health Organisation 4.12.14

Church JA*, Fitzgerald F*, Walker AS, Gibb DM, Prendergast A.

The expanding role of cotrimoxazole in developing countries

Lancet Infectious Dis 2014 Nov 14. pii: S1473-3099(14)70892-8. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(14)70892-8.

*joint first author


sonya_crowe

Dr Sonya Crowe

Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellow & Senior Research Associate in Operational Research
UCL Clinical Operational Research Unit
 
 


Sonya has a background in physics and worked for the Department of Health before joining the Clinical Operational Research Unit at UCL in 2009. During her time at UCL she has worked on a variety of areas in healthcare, collaborating with local NHS organisations, those informing national policy and international partners working on global health problems. She is currently a Health Foundation Improvement Science Fellow, using Operational Research to explore ways of improving outcomes for infants once they've returned home after cardiac surgery and studying the role that mathematical modelling plays in the complex decision-making process of designing a better service. Her main interests are in using information to help people within health services make better decisions and drawing on learning from complementary disciplines (e.g. innovation studies and knowledge mobilisation) to enhance the effectiveness and relevance of analytical techniques within healthcare.

 

Relevant publications

Crowe, S., Prost, A., Hossen, M., Azad. . . & Pagel, C. (2015). Generating insights from trends in newborn care practices from prospective population-based studies: Examples from India, Bangladesh and Nepal. PLoS ONE, 10 (7). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127893

Pitt, M., Monks, T., Crowe, S. & Vasilakis, C. (2015). Systems modelling and simulation in health service design, delivery and decision making. BMJ Qual Saf doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2015-004430

Pagel, C., Prost, A., Hossen, M., Azad, . . . & Crowe, S. (2014). Is essential newborn care provided by institutions and after home births? Analysis of prospective data from community trials in rural South Asia. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 14, 99-?. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-14-99

Crowe, S., Bennett, P., Daraktchiev & M., Utley, M. (2014). Use of modelling to inform public health policy: a case study on the blood-borne transmission of variant-CJD. Journal of the Operational Research Society 65, 269-277

Crowe, S., Seal, A., Grijalva-Eternod & C., Kerac, M. (2014). Effect of nutrition survey 'cleaning criteria' on estimates of malnutrition prevalence and disease burden: secondary data analysis. PeerJ, 2, e380-?

Pagel, C., Crowe, S., Brown, K. & Utley, M. (2014). The benefits and risks of risk-adjustment in paediatric cardiac surgery.Heart, 100 (7), 528-529. doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-304848

Pagel, C., Utley, M., Crowe, S., Witter, T. . . & Brown, K. (2013). Real time monitoring of risk-adjusted paediatric cardiac surgery outcomes using variable life-adjusted display: Implementation in three UK centres. Heart, 99 (19), 1445-1450. doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2013-303671

Crowe, S., Utley, M., Costello, A. & Pagel, C. (2012). How many births in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia will not be attended by a skilled birth attendant between 2011 and 2015?. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 12, 4-?. doi:10.1186/1471-2393-12-4

Crowe, S., Pagel, C., Bull, C., Fenton, M… & Utley, M. (2012) Using a mathematical model to assist with the management of paediatric heart transplant waiting lists: a case study. IMA Journal of Management Mathematics, 23 (2): 99-116

Crowe, S., Utley, M., Walker, G., Grove, P. & Pagel, C. (2011). A model to evaluate mass vaccination against pneumococcus as a countermeasure against pandemic influenza. Vaccine, 29 (31), 5065-5077


chelsea

Dr Chelsea Morroni

Clinical Lecturer
UCL Institute for Global Health & UCL Institute for Women's Health

 

Honorary Senior Lecturer in Public Health, University of Cape Town and University of Botswana
Honorary Assistant Professor of Medicine Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and the Botswana UPenn Partnership
Special advisor, Botswana Ministry of Health, Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme

Chelsea is an epidemiologist and sexual and reproductive health doctor working towards improving the quality of sexual and reproductive health and maternal health services in low- and middle-income settings. She has been based full-time in Botswana for the past 2 years, initiating various quality improvement projects in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and NGOs; she was previously based in South Africa for over a decade. Her team are utilizing a range of research methodologies in this work, from randomised designs to process and economic evaluations, as well as developing a series of health service-based demonstration projects and clinical centres of excellence.


michael emes

Dr Michael Emes

Deputy Director
UCL Centre for Systems Engineering
 


Michael is Deputy Director of UCL Centre for Systems Engineering and Head of the Technology Management Group at UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL). He completed his first degree in Engineering, Economics and Management at St John's College, Oxford, and a PhD at MSSL in developing ultra-low temperature cooling systems for spacecraft. He previously worked as a strategy consultant for Mercer Management Consulting (now Oliver Wyman) on projects in retail, energy and transport. Michael now conducts teaching and research at UCL in the areas of systems thinking and engineering, technology strategy, risk management and decision-making in domains including transport, health and aerospace. He is Programme Manager and a lead trainer for the European Space Agency's Project Manager Training Course.


till

 

Dr Till Bärnighausen

Associate Professor
Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Programme Director
Health Systems and Impact at Wellcome Trust Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies (South Africa)


Till works on health care access, transformation of health services, and the causal impacts of HIV treatment and other global health priority interventions on population health, economic, social and behavioural outcomes. Till and his team have established the population impact of HIV treatment - delivered under the real-life conditions of a public-sector health system in rural Southern Africa - on mortality and life expectancy, employment an educational attainment, and health seeking and sexual behaviour. He has introduced several methods innovations for applied, population-based HIV research. Till is a medical specialist in Family Medicine and holds doctoral degrees in International Health Economics (Harvard) and History of Medicine (University of Heidelberg), as well as master degrees in Health Systems Management (LSHTM) and Financial Economics (SOAS). He previously worked as a physician in Germany, China, and South Africa; as a journalist in Berlin; and as a management consultant for McKinsey & Company in Europe. Till currently holds a faculty position at UCL in the Department of Infectious Disease and Population Health.


 

Duncan Wagstaff

Dr Duncan Wagstaff

Anaesthesia Specialist Trainee (ST5, North Central London)
Academic Clinical Fellow (UCL)
MD(res) student (Department of Applied Health Research, UCL)

Duncan is an Anaesthetist interested in exploring the use of data for clinical quality improvement. He is currently involved in the implementation and ethnographic evaluation of the new national Perioperative Quality Improvement Programme (PQIP) led by the Royal College of Anaesthetists. His other clinical academic interests include Health Economics and Global Anaesthesia. He completed his first degree in Natural Sciences (Physics) at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and then worked as a financial derivatives trader for four years before qualifying in Medicine at Green College, Oxford.