GEE News Publication
A A A

Gee Research Blog

Male Promiscuity Boosts Role of Chance in Sex Chromosome Evolution

Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:02:31 +0000

Humans, like all mammals and birds, determine sex with chromosomes. Whether a fertilised egg develops into a male or female depends on what chromosomes it carries Scientists have long recognised that genes evolve a little differently on the sex chromosomes, and recent research in GEE suggests this may be due to differing patterns of inheritance […]

The post Male Promiscuity Boosts Role of Chance in Sex Chromosome Evolution appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Sloths Move Slow, Evolve Fast

Wed, 11 Mar 2015 18:20:41 +0000

Sloths might be notorious for their leisurely pace of life, but research published last year shows they are no slow coaches when it comes to evolution. Sloths, as we know and love them, are small, slow-moving creatures found in the trees of tropical rainforests. But modern sloths are pretty odd compared to their extinct relatives. […]

The post Sloths Move Slow, Evolve Fast appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Write About Research – A GEE Research Blog Competition

Tue, 03 Mar 2015 15:28:43 +0000

The GEE Research blog communicates UCL science with a wider, non-specialist audience, by providing short summaries of recent research in the department of UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment. This provides an opportunity to engage with a broad audience, including other academics, students, members of the public, and even businesses and policy-makers. It is a great […]

The post Write About Research – A GEE Research Blog Competition appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Was Fermentation Key to Yeast Diversification?

Tue, 17 Feb 2015 15:30:43 +0000

From bread to beer, yeast has shaped our diets and our recreation for centuries. Recent research in GEE shows how humans have shaped the evolution of this important microorganism. As well as revealing the evolutionary origins of modern fission yeast, the new study published in Nature Genetics this month shows how techniques developed for detecting […]

The post Was Fermentation Key to Yeast Diversification? appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Planning for the Future – Resilience to Extreme Weather

Thu, 15 Jan 2015 15:13:14 +0000

As climate change progresses, extreme weather events are set to increase in frequency, costing billions and causing immeasurable harm to lives and livelihoods. GEE’s Professor Georgina Mace contributed to the recent Royal Society report on “Resilience to Extreme Weather”, which predicts the future impacts of increasing extreme weather events, and evaluates potential strategies for improving […]

The post Planning for the Future – Resilience to Extreme Weather appeared first on GEE Research.

Read more...

Helen Chatterjee awarded AHRC Grant

28 May 2014

Helen Chatterjee

Dr Helen Chatterjee (GEE) has been awarded a £550,000 grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to investigate the value of museum encounters in social prescribing.  Social prescribing links patients in primary care with local sources of support within the community which can improve their health and wellbeing. The 3 year project, called Museums on Prescription, will target socially isolated, vulnerable and/or lonely older people who will be referred from the NHS and Adult Social Care departments to partner museums in Camden and Kent, including UCL Museums, the British Museum, Sir Johan Soanes Museum, Islington Museum, Canterbury Museums and Galleries and Tunbridge Wells Museums and Gallery. Other partners include AgeUK, Arts Council England, the New Economics Foundation and  the Royal Society for Public Health. The project, which kicks off in July this year, is led by Helen, who is the Principal Investigator, Paul Camic who is a Professor of Psychology & Public Health and a Co-Investigator, at Canterbury Christ Church University, and Dr Linda Thomson (GEE and UCL Museums), who will be the lead Research Associate.

Page last modified on 28 may 14 13:04