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GEOL0028 Marine Geology

This course aims to inform our undergraduate students about many of the important physical aspects of deep-marine systems and involves the study of the range of sediment delivery processes from shelf to deep water, their deposits, trace-fossil assemblages and bed-thickness distributions as an archive of controls.

Coordinator: Prof Kevin Pickering

Module details
TitleMarine Geology
UG CodeGEOL0028
CoordinatorProf Kevin Pickering
Other Contributors 
Term2
Credit15 credits
Written ExamNone 
Coursework100% coursework
Oral Presentation 
Pre-RequisitesGEOL0010 Surface Processes & Structures
Maths & Stats Content and RequirementGeneral GCSE-level (or equivalent) knowledge of maths
Total Number of Hours of Student Work188 hours
Hours of Lectures/Seminars20 hours
Hours of Practicals/Problem Classes20 hours
Hours of TutorialsAs needed
Days of FieldworkNone
OtherNone
Content

Modern and ancient deep-marine (below wave base) processes, deposits and environments comprise about 60% of the Earth’s surface and represent a major (if commonly hidden) facet of Earth surface processes. This course aims to inform our undergraduate students about many of the important physical aspects of deep-marine systems. Based on a textbook by Kevin T. Pickering & Richard N. Hiscott (Deep Marine Systems, to be published by Wiley-Blackwell in late 2014), the course involves the study of the range of sediment delivery processes from shelf to deep water, their deposits, trace-fossil assemblages and bed-thickness distributions as an archive of controls (e.g., seismicity, climate change, etc.).

Content to include:

  • Physical and biological processes in deep-marine environments.
  • Sediments (facies) – beds, their sedimentary characteristics and interpreted depositional processes.
  • Deep-water ichnology (trace-fossil assemblages as palaeoenvironmental indicators).
  • Time-space integration (including sequence stratigraphy).
  • Statistical properties of sediment gravity flow (SGF) deposits (e.g., bed thickness distributions and how they can be interpreted).
  • Sediment drifts and abyssal sediment waves (e.g., contourites).
  • Submarine fans and related depositional systems: Modern (e.g., dimensions, scale, subenvironments, sediment sourcing).
  • Submarine fans and related depositional systems: Ancient (models, interpretations of subenvironments and inferred controls on depositionfrom the stratigraphic record).
  • Evolving and mature extensional systems (tectonic models linked to stratigraphic architecture and evolution).
  • Subduction margins (tectonic models linked to stratigraphic architecture and evolution).
  • Foreland basins (tectonic models linked to stratigraphic architecture and evolution).
  • Strike-slip continental margin basins.

AIMS

Modern and ancient deep-marine (below wave base) processes, deposits and environments comprise about 60% of the Earth’s surface and represent a major (if commonly hidden) facet of Earth surface processes. This course aims to inform our undergraduate students about many of the important physical aspects of deep-marine systems. Based on a textbook by Kevin T. Pickering & Richard N. Hiscott (Deep Marine Systems, to be published by Wiley-Blackwell in late 2014), the course involves the study of the range of sediment delivery processes from shelf to deep water, their deposits, trace-fossil assemblages and bed-thickness distributions as an archive of controls (e.g., seismicity, climate change, etc.).

OUTCOMES

An understanding of deep-marine physical processes, deposits, environments and platetectonic context. Acquire skills in subsurface data analysis and interpretation.