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Visit to the Institute of Making

Tue, 01 Apr 2014 10:14:53 +0000

We are very lucky to have an Institute of Making at UCL. I often walk past its impressive glass front, peer at the collection of things on shelves that can be seen inside, and wonder what on earth they are and what goes on in there. So I was delighted when a group of us [...]

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New Project – MiCLUES

Mon, 10 Mar 2014 16:52:29 +0000

We recently started a project called MiCLUES to develop dynamic smartphone-based visitor guidance algorithms and software for the Royal College of Music Museum of Instruments.  The aim is to enable visitors to make better use of the combined physical and digital collections and to chart both curated and personalised paths through the museum. The project [...]

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Think-aloud studies of information behaviour

Publication date: Jan 28, 2013 3:20:59 PM

Start: Feb 5, 2013 1:00:00 PM
End: Feb 5, 2013 2:00:00 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

Painless Introductions series icon


In this Painless Introduction, Stephann Makri will discuss how to plan and conduct think-aloud observations of digital information behaviour. This will be an interactive and discursive Painless Introduction where you will be directly involved in planning a study aimed at looking at how information is acquired, interpreted and used.

After the planning is done, an audience member will be invited to participate in the study and we will discuss how digital information environments can be designed to better support their digital information behaviour.

Stephann Makri is a Research Associate at UCL Interaction Centre. His research looks at how people acquire, interpret and use information in the context of their work and how this understanding can be fed into the user-centred design and evaluation of digital information environments. Stephann is currently working on a £1.82m UK Research Council funded project called SerenA: Chance Encounters in the Space of Ideas, which has involved gaining a rich understanding of peoples' examples of serendipity (including coming across information serendipitously) and using this understanding to inform the design of digital information environments aimed at creating opportunities for 'happy accidents.'

Page last modified on 28 jan 13 15:02 by Sarah Davenport