Skip to site navigation

Reforming the House of Lords: Meg Russell gives evidence

31 October 2011

Whitehall

Meg Russell appeared before The Joint Committee on the Draft House of Lords Reform Bill.

Dr Russell answered questions on the coalition's Lords reform proposals, drawing from her research into other countries' parliamentary systems and her analysis of the functioning of the House of Lords itself. Issues covered included how an elected House of Lords might compare to other elected second chambers in terms of its powers and strength relative to the Commons.

Meg Russell has led a long-term ESRC-funded project, cataloguing the changing face of the House of Lords and analysing the ongoing process of its reform. She is the author of Reforming the House of Lords: Lessons from Overseas (OUP).

The evidence session can be viewed at the link below.

Further Information

Join the Debate

Blog

Elections, referendums, political parties and the Constitution Unit

Thu, 27 Aug 2015 10:00:06 +0000

In the third of our series of posts adapted from presentations at the Unit’s 20th anniversary conference, Alan Renwick documents on how the UK’s electoral framework has evolved since 1995 and illustrates how the Unit has shaped the implementation of changes. Looking forward, he identifies the franchise and the current gulf between citizens and politicians as key areas for […]

Read more...

The Constitutional Standards of the House of Lords’ Constitution Committee: A valuable tool for enhancing scrutiny

Tue, 25 Aug 2015 11:00:47 +0000

To mark the launch of the second edition of The Constitutional Standards of the House of Lords Constitution Committee, Jack Simson Caird considers the role that a set of constitutional standards could play in the current government. Drawing on the example of English votes for English laws, he argues that such a code would increase […]

Read more...

Too many cooks? An analysis of the Thai Draft Constitution

Tue, 11 Aug 2015 09:00:00 +0000

Last summer, this blog carried an analysis of the Thai interim constitution that was introduced following the coup d’etat in May. One year on, Jam Kraprayoon assesses the proposed permanent constitution that is due to be put to a referendum in January. He writes that the current draft suggests a shift away from elected officials to political appointees, ordinary […]

Read more...
Mailing List

Connect with us

RSSFlickr

Footer menu