Department of Greek & Latin
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MA Philosophy & Religion Courses


  • CL5669  Neoplatonism

Prof. Anne Sheppard (RHUL)
*+40 credits
Meets: Mondays 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
The first term of this course will be spent studying the philosophy of Plotinus.  In the second term we will move on to his successors, Porphyry, Iamblichus and Proclus, and to discussion of the Neoplatonic commentaries on Plato and Aristotle written in late antique Athens and Alexandria.   Some previous knowledge of Greek philosophy is desirable, but not essential.  Texts may be studied in translation.
Assessment: Two essays of 4,000-5,000 words each
Place: RHUL Bedford Square Annexe WC1E 6DP

  • PHILGA37 Aristotle

Dr Fiona Leigh (UCL)
20 credits
Meets: Weds. 11:00 - 13:00 (term 1)
This combined upper level undergraduate and graduate level course aims to familiarize students with a range of Aristotle’s philosophical arguments and analyses of the world as he encountered it. Topics include Aristotle’s logic (Prior Analytics), hylomorphic metaphysics (Metaphysics), causation (Physics), virtue ethics (Nicomachean Ethics), philosophy of mind (de Anima), and epistemology (Posterior Analytics).
Assessment: one 5,000 word essay
Place: UCL -- 19 Gordon Square, rm 10

  • PHILGA39 Graduate Studies in Ancient Philosophy

Dr Fiona Leigh (UCL)
*20 credits
Meets: Weds. 11:00 - 13:00 (term 2)
The course will focus on Plato’s later dialogue, the Sophist, and Fiona Leigh’s draft manuscript of a new reading of this dialogue, from start to finish. Issues and topics to be addressed include what is involved in giving a philosophical definition of a kind, the ontological status of mimetic representations, modes of being, the comparative status of Forms and participants, and the nature of falsehood. Some of the central claims to be defended will be that the method of collection and division and the more analytic method of dialectic are compatible, Forms are treated as causes, not universals, in the dialogue, and not‐being is analysed as equivalent to difference
Assessment: one 5,000 word essay
Place: UCL

Dr Hugh Bowden (KCL)
*20 credits
Meets: tbc
What can the mythology of the ancient Greeks tell us about ancient Greek social, cultural and religious organization, or about their understanding of the world? Can it tell us anything about humankind more generally? These questions have been asked by scholars in a range of disciplines from anthropology to psychology and beyond, and this module examines some of the answers they have come up with. The module does not offer a survey of Greek mythology itself, or focus on individual literary works as such, but concentrates on the ways that Greek myths have been interpreted from the nineteenth century onwards. This module is partner to 7AACM420 Greek Religion: Culture & Cognition, and it is recommended that the two modules be taken together.
Assessment: will be one 5,000 word essay.
Place: KCL

Dr Hugh Bowden (KCL)
*20 credits
Meets: tbc
The study of religion has in recent years benefited from insights draw from cognitive anthropology, psychology and other disciplines, all of which make up the area of study referred to as the coginitive science of religion. These new approaches are beginning to be applied to the study of ancient religion, and this module aims to take up some of these ideas and see what light they may cast on the study of ancient Greek religious practices, in particular in the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age. The module does not offer an overview of Greek religion, and it is intended for students who already have some understanding of the nature of Greek religion. This module is partner to 7AACM420 Greek Religion: Myth & Meaning, and it is recommended that the two modules be taken together.
Assessment: will be one 5,000 word essay.
Place: KCL

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