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UCL Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering

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Life at CEGE

Our students, in their own words. Find out what life's really like at the UCL Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering

Postgraduate taught 

Earthquake Engineering with Disaster Management MSc 

Camilo De La Barra (Chile), 2016/17

What inspired you to study MSc EEDM?
Chile - where I am from - is one of the most seismically active countries in the world, and has been devastated by earthquakes and tsunamis in recent years (e.g. Maule 2010 earthquake, Mw = 8.8). In spite of having renowned design, construction codes and a strong seismic engineering community, these natural disasters still pose major problems to our country. There is a special need for trained people who have a global outlook and different perspectives who can provide solutions to address these problems. For me, that was where UCL’s MSc EEDM came in.

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Why is it important for someone to study MSc EEDM?The course provides students with a global context on how seismic events and related disasters affect people and infrastructure. In a growing and more demanding world, the engineers of today must provide innovative engineering solutions which are not necessarily from their field of expertise, but also involve multidisciplinary views. In this sense, this MSc programme stands out from others as it engages with leaders in catastrophe modelling, seismic and structural engineering, geophysics and the social sciences.

What can students expect to learn on MSc EEDM and can this help them with their future career?
Unlike other Earthquake Engineering MSc programmes, I would highlight that the MSc EEDM is the only one that provides a truly holistic view of the aspects related not only to earthquakes, but to a variety of natural disasters. This establishes constant links with industry-related topics. It also gives you a comprehensive insight of how different disciplines – rather than only seismic engineering – approach a problem. By doing so, students that complete the programme are well-prepared to face an engineering role where not only ‘numbers’ are needed, but also critical thinking and a global outlook – both of which add value to the future world demands on these matters.

What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
I enjoyed the opportunity to share with students, professors and leaders from around the world, as well as being able to study how different cultures deal with natural disasters. I also enjoyed the collaboration between the department and industry, which played an important role during our studies and the MSc research projects and opened worldwide opportunities to all the students.


 

Vibek Manandhar (Nepal), 2016/17 
Picture of student

Why is it important for someone to study MSc EEDM?
Even in the 21st century, earthquakes are one of the most unpredictable phenomena – one that needs many more scientists, researchers and professionals alike to supplement each other’s work. Earthquake resistance and economy are always on a delicate balance. The world needs more researchers and professionals to push the boundaries and work on fields like earthquake hazard, fragility of structures as well as innovative and economic solutions for improving earthquake resistance of structures.

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What inspired you to study MSc EEDM?
Nepal lies in one of the most sensitive regions in terms of seismic hazard. Growing up there meant that I’ve always wanted to do something in the field of earthquake research. Having worked for four years as a design consultant after my bachelors, I wanted to gain an advanced level of knowledge in structural/earthquake engineering and answer all the questions that I had accumulated over the years. I then wanted to put it to use and upgrade my career – while helping society and the world as a whole with a degree from one of the best universities.

What can students expect to learn on MSc EEDM and can this help them with their future career?
The course is well-tuned to providing students with the best quality education, starting from the very basics. It gradually builds up the students' knowledge and makes them competent enough to solve the most advanced problems in core areas like dynamics, seismic risk and seismic design. By the end of the course, the students are well armed with the knowledge and ability to fit in a wide range of career roles.

What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
Learning from the best professors in the field of engineering at one of the top universities in the world was an amazing experience. In addition, I enjoyed interacting, learning and – all the while – having a great time with friends from around the world! Besides university, I had the best time of my life living in London, experiencing the sights, sounds and tastes of one of the greatest cities on the globe. I must also express my sincere gratitude to the Chevening Scholarship programme and University College London for making all this possible.


 

Keith Adams (Britain), 2015/16 
Student picture

What can students expect to learn on MSc EEDM and can this help them with their future career?

As well as rigorous structural design and retrofitting techniques, the seismic risk assessment modules are well regarded globally. Cultural heritage preservation is a departmental strength. The MSc prepares a student for a career in structural engineering, catastrophe risk modelling and third sector organisations involved in disaster mitigation.

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What inspired you to study MSc EEDM?
I looked at the options for Earthquake Engineering carefully before deciding that the research group at EPICentre were incredibly well cited. I reasoned that a first-class MSc was likely to be delivered by world class academic staff – UCL was the natural choice.

Why is it important for someone to study MSc EEDM?
Disaster Management is a perfect adjunct to the engineering content. Pretty early on we learnt that there were multi-disciplinary teams involved in earthquake engineering, by providing an interface between earth science, social science and engineering we understood the interactions that could lead to effective solutions, by people for people. Essentially, how to join the dots together.

What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
UCL is an amazing academic community built on equality of opportunity – it’s bright, vibrant and exciting. The EEDM course is small and personal with a high ratio of staff interaction, meaning the MSc students can contribute to the department immediately. Meeting friends from all corners of the world is a life-changing experience.


 

Chen Huang (China), 2014/15 
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What inspired you to study MSc EEDM?
Though several disasters have stricken the world recently resulting in huge economic losses and casualties, there are always some inspiring stories about how the earthquake engineers fight against the earthquake and other natural disasters. For example, a smartphone app can send out an early-warning message before the earthquake occurs, so that people can escape from the building. Likewise, new engineering techniques have been developed to improve the existing building and protect people. As an engineer, I want to be part of this positive change.

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Why is it important for someone to study MSc EEDM?
If, as a structural engineer, you want to tackle the unpredictable natural forces such as earthquake and another natural hazard, then consider EEDM. The EEDM programme provides the best expert team in Europe regarding earthquake and other disasters. It also has strong connections with engineering and reinsurance industries, great opportunities to work with world-leading companies and experts, excellent training for future career and sufficient support for students.

What can students expect to learn on MSc EEDM and how can this help them with their future career?
The EEDM MSc provides systematic training on structural design and analysis for both building and infrastructures, as well as seismology, catastrophe modelling and disaster management, in case of earthquake and other natural disasters. The field trips available allow you to assess earthquake damage and visit the reconstruction sites. Not only will EEDM MSc prepare you as an engineer, but it will also equip you with transferable skills relating to communication, networking and team-working.

What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
The field trip to Italy and other team-building activities. I had the chance to meet people from different backgrounds and learn from them.


 

Engineering for International Development MSc

Natasha Allen, 2017/18

What can a student expect to learn on MSc EfID?
Expect to be exposed to a broad range of topics and approaches to engineering for development. Amongst those, find a set of topics and questions that motivate you and dive into those. There is a lot of opportunity for learning outside the classroom and it’s good to take advantage of it.

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What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
I really enjoyed that most of our courses emphasized project-based learning and encouraged us to think holistically and practically about the actual challenges of working on engineering problems in developing contexts. This approach really solidified the understanding that 30 percent of the solution is technology and 70 percent is people which – as it turns out – is the hardest part! It was fun and challenging to work on nuanced problems with my classmates. 

What are your plans after completing MSc Engineering for International Development? How will MSc EfID help?
I am starting my own social enterprise that focuses on building a local workforce to operate and maintain rural community electricity systems, starting in Myanmar. The MSc program helped me build a framework with which to critically assess development interventions and continues to help me question and challenge my own assumptions which should enable me to ensure that I am realizing true impact in my work. 

What advice can you give to someone starting out in this area?
Be open minded and always listen and ask first. Quite often people we aim to help already know what they need. Our job is to help them realise that and open platforms for their voices to be heard in the process.       


                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Gabriela May Lagunes, 2017/18

What inspired you to study MSc EfiD?
In my four years as an undergraduate (studying BSc Physics at UCL), I worked with the UCL branch of Engineers Without Borders. This experience showed me the power of engineering, technology and science in improving people’s livelihoods. From this experience, I decided to take Engineering for International Development MSc (EfID), hoping to kick-start a career in international development.  

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Why is it important for someone to study MSc EfID now?
There is a remarkably wide range of challenges that the global community is facing today. From climate change to lack of energy and water security, high waste production, food scarcity, and humanitarian crisis in conflict areas, every single situation could be supported by the set of skills that this programme will help students develop. 

What can students expect to learn on MSc EfID?
The theoretical and technical basis needed to start a career in international development, the challenges of the industry and the areas where innovation and creativity is needed to push forward sustainability worldwide.

What have you enjoyed most about your experience at UCL CEGE?
Engineering for International Development MSc allowed me to learn the theory behind several aspects related to development and sustainability, from water security and clean energies to humanitarianism and disaster risk reduction. Lectures were given by people with many years of relevant experience in the field, making them very engaging and insightful.