XClose

UCL Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering

Home
Menu

UCL Accessibility Research Group (ARG)

The Accessibility Research Group (ARG) is a multi-disciplinary research team that conducts​ interdisciplinary research into accessibility

Experiment participants walking in and out of a mock tube train carriage

The objective of ARG is to make the world accessible to everyone. We aim to understand how people navigate their environment during everyday activities, and how poor design of transport systems could be improved to provide accessible systems that enable everyone to achieve their full potential.

About

ARG was set up and is directed by Prof Nick Tyler CBE. ARG is home to:

  • PAMELA – a multisensory pedestrian environment laboratory studying human interactions with infrastructure​
  • PEARL​​ – an enhanced and extended version of the PAMELA facility (PDF)
  • UCL-Squared – the Universal Composition Laboratory at UCL

Our Objectives

  • To carry out basic and applied research into all aspects of accessibility to transport systems
  • To work towards the elimination of barriers to access for all people especially people who experience physical, sensory or cognitive barriers to their involvement in society
  • To base our research on a user-centred approach, working with people to understand their difficulties and to investigate solutions they find appropriate
  • To disseminate results and work in progress to as wide an audience as possible

People

The UCL Accessibility Research Group (ARG) is located within the Centre for Transport Studies in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering​ at University College London.

ARG researchers
Current PhD students
  • David Ashmore
  • Olga Binions​
  • Natalie Chan
  • Ran Chen
  • Liliana Ortega Garza
  • Corina Kwami​​
  • Mojtaba (Adam) Malekzadeh
  • Adriana Ortegón
  • Nikos Papadosifos
  • Nuria Hernandez Rivera
  • Natan Waintrub Santibáñez
  • Pam Turpin
  • ​Dinos Visvikis
ARG alumni
  • Dr Marta Bordas
  • Mr Ian Brown​
  • Dr Martha Caiafa
  • Dr Elvezia Cepolina
  • Dr Tsu-Jui C​heng​​
  • Dr Craig Childs
  • Mr Chris Cook
  • Dr Emily Digges La Touche
  • Prof Rodr​igo Fernández
  • Dr Simrn Kaur Gill​ ​
  • Dr Catherine Holloway
  • Dr Ka​ren Hayrapetyan
  • Dr Patricia Idaewor
  • Dr Rana Imam
  • Dr Charles Kunaka
  • Dr Ricardo Marar
  • Ms Claudia Ramírez
  • Dr Kristy Revell​​
  • Ms Lone Rose
  • Mr Harry Rostrom
  • Prof. Paulo Cesar Marques Silva
  • Ms Reka Solymosi
  • Dr Roselle Thoreau​
  • Dr Maria Alicia Vicencio
  • Ms Marcela Wainstein
  • Dr Biao Yang
  • Dr Michel Zhao

Study (PhD)

Anyone interested in CEGE's research degree programmes is advised in the first instance to visit the Postgraduate research section of the website.  

Accessibility is a subject area which is ripe for doctoral research. Current doctoral projects include biomechanics of wheelchair propulsion, the use of organic models in modelling city evolution for developing countries, the design of buses for improved accessibility, wheelchair design for the safety of children in vehicles, the issues around the increasing use of mobility scooters and the relationships involved in care for people with dementia. 

Recent doctoral projects include the study of people on stairs, the use of public transport information by older people, accessibility issues for micronetworks and feeder services and implementation of supranational regulation. Other areas of interest include cognitive analysis of information needs, work with people with learning difficulties, pedestrian activities, infrastructure design and community-centred governance. 

Further ARG study information

Research students within ARG have all the benefits of being members of the UCL Doctoral School, of working within the Centre for Transport Studies and the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, including its Centre for Urban Sustainability and Resilience. Students are also part of UCL CRUCIBLE, through which they can reach and work with people across University College London. 

Much of our research involves external bodies such as UK Government departments (in particular the Department for Transport, Department for Communities and Local Government, Department for Energy and Climate Change, the Department of Health, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Transport for London), local government, and private sector companies in the UK and overseas. We also have extensive and increasing engagement with researchers and governments overseas, notably in Latin America, Japan, China and the EU. 

In addition, those working within the Accessibility Research Group can become involved in any of our research projects - some of which can help to provide useful data sources, experimental facilities, or interesting facets of problems which can be explored as part of the doctoral research. This contact helps to keep the focus on real issues, while encouraging the more philosophical side of research to flourish. Doctoral students are encouraged to take part in training courses organised by UCL or elsewhere as appropriate throughout their period of study. If you are interested in doctoral study on any aspect of accessibility, you should contact Prof Nick Tyler, Dr Taku Fujiyama or Dr Steve Taylor in the first instance to discuss the possibilities.

Projects

  • Healthy Cities
  • Accessibility & User Needs in Transport (AUNT)
  • Dynamic Accessible Vehicle Interior Design Feasibility (DAVID-F)
  • Robust Methods for Monitoring & Understanding People in Public Spaces (REASON)
  • Trendsetting Accessibility Research Group in Engineering and Transport (TARGET)
  • Evaluation of outcomes of a gene therapy intervention for Léber’s condition
  • Sustainable Urban Systems to Transfer Achievable Implementation Network (SUSTAIN)
  • Personal Intellingent City Accessible Vehicle (PICAV)
  • Training Opportunities for Community-Centred Transport Applications (TOCCATA)
  • Accessibility Research Reaching OutWard (ARROW)

Publications

An ARGnote is a peer reviewed two page note that explains key research findings from the UCL Accessibility Research Group (ARG). The aim of an ARGnote is to distribute research findings in a way that makes them accessible to all. To achieve this ARGnotes are written in a non-technical style of writing, and are supported by presentations, supplementary material, videos and audio files depending on the topic of the ARGnote.
 
The ARGnotes cover the length and breadth of research that is conducted within ARG. The series was launched in January 2014 and all ARGnotes are peer reviewed by the researchers at ARG.

ARGnotes

Title

Author(s)

 

Volume

 

Issue

 

ISSN

 

The need for an invisible wearable walking support: it’s what the users want!

Xenia Karekla and Nick Tyler

1

7

2054-4561

Emily Digges La Touche

1

6

2054-4561

Derrick Boampong, Catherine Holloway, Roselle Thoreau, Nick Tyler

2

6

2054-4561

Nick Tyler 

1

5

2054-4561

Roselle Thoreau

2

5

2054-4561

Nikos Papadosifos

1

4

2054-4561

Roselle Thoreau

2

4

2054-4561

Nick Tyler and Roselle Thoreau

1

3

2054-4561

David P. Ashmore and Nick Tyler

2

3

2054-4561

Simrn Kaur Gill

1

2

2054-4561

David P. Ashmore

2

2

2054-4561

Simrn Kaur Gill

1

1

2054-4561

Catherine Holloway, Roselle Thoreau, Pete Smitham, Reka Solymosi

2

1

2054-4561