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CCHH News & Events

Chinese Food Philosophy: A Recipe for Life

Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH), Bee Wilson and Ching-He Huang in conversation with Donald Sloan, Wednesday 16 , January 2019, 6.30–8.30pm, at Asia House, 63 New Cavendish Street, London W1G 7LP.
Book via Eventbrite. Free tickets for students.
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Madness in Paris, Paris in Madness: The City, Emotions and the Insane at the Dawn of Mass Society

A History of Psychological Disciplines Seminar with Professor Jean-Jacques Courtine (University of Auckland, NZ / QMUL.
Time: Mon 19 November 2018, 18:00 – 19:30.
Place: SELCS Common Room, G24 Foster Court, Malet Place.
Registration via Eventbrite:
https://parismadness.eventbrite.co.uk

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Movement Matters: Dance, Kinaesthesia and the Avant-Garde

A workshop-performance event to mark the paperback edition of Irina Sirotkina and Roger Smith, The Sixth Sense of the Avant-Garde: Dance, Kinaesthesia and the Arts in Revolutionary Russia (Bloomsbury, December 2018).
Time: Saturday 1 December 2018, 2:00–6:00pm.
Place:  IAS Common Ground (ground floor, south wing, Wilkins building).
Registration via Eventbrite:
https://movement-matters.eventbrite.co.uk
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Longing For Rain: Spectral lovers and the new urban spaces of middle-class Beijing

A UCL Health Humanities seminar with Vivienne Lo and Nashuyuan Wang.
Time: Thursday 15 November,  6.15–7.15pm.
Place: SELCS Common Room, G24 Foster Court, Malet Place More...

The Cholera Pandemic,Transnational Politics, and the Cold War in Southeast Asia and China, 1960-1965

An IAS Talking Point seminar with Visiting Research Fellow Dr Fang Xiaoping 方小平 and responses from Dr Vivienne Lo  and Dr Andrew Wear.
Time: Wed 20 June 2018, 6–8pm
Place: IAS Common Ground (ground floor, south wing, Wilkins building)
Registration via Eventbrite.
Download a flyer here.
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Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture 2018

Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH) will be giving the 2nd Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture at the Needham Research Institute, Cambridge on Friday 25 May, 4pm. More...

Imagining Chinese Medicine

(edited volume, Vivienne Lo & Penelope Barrett, Brill, 2018) has now been published in Open Access. You can browse or download it at:
http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004366183
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MA Dissertation Conference 2018: Transnational Studies and Chinese Health & Humanity

Wednesday 23 May, 09.00–13.00, Room 101, 16–18 Gordon Square.
Please come along to support our wonderful students and find out about the breathtaking range of their research! More...

Madness in Paris, Paris in Madness: The City, Emotions and the Insane at the Dawn of Mass Society

9 November 2018

A History of Psychological Disciplines Seminar with Professor Jean-Jacques Courtine (University of Auckland, NZ / QMUL.
Time: Mon 19 November 2018, 18:00 – 19:30.
Place: SELCS Common Room, G24 Foster Court, Malet Place.
Registration via Eventbrite:
https://parismadness.eventbrite.co.uk

Paris in the last quarter of the 19th century… With the accelerated urbanisation of the capital city and the massive growth in its population, new anxieties emerge. Alcoholism is rampant, degeneracy lies in wait. “Are there not more madmen today than at any other time?” worries among many others Dr Paul Garnier in his Madness in Paris (1890). He is well-placed to answer his own question: Garnier is Chief Medical Officer of the Special Infirmary at the police headquarters’ holding cells, to which the bad, the mad and the sad scooped up from the pavements of the capital are transported. And the response is in the affirmative: the crowding of the city by dense and floating masses of anonymous individuals has unleashed previously unknown forms of urban madness. The city therefore produces madness, observed, transcribed, identified, and classified by psychiatry. We could stop here, seeing nothing more in it than a classic episode in the long history of the control of the insane. But there is another way of reading this picture of urban misery, whose language is scrupulously documented in the psychiatric reports; that is, from the perspective of a history of emotions “from below”, hearing in it the voices of these lost souls. Then a different city reveals itself. For if cities engender madness, madness produces cities: a coherent image of the capital emerges from these delusions. It possesses its own geography, its own monumentality, its own landmarks; but also its own itineraries, its own lines of flight, its own meanderings. It will be one of the goals of this presentation to reconstruct madscapes, the mapping of the Paris of the mad. And to wonder: all things considered, is this Paris of the deluded really any stranger than the delusional Paris invented by mass urban society?

Page last modified on 06 nov 18 17:21 by Penelope Barrett