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Order/Disorder: The artist-researcher as connector-disrupter-running messenger?

A UCL IAS Talking Point with Dr Kai Syng Tan, artist and UCL IAS Visiting Research Fellow.
Time: 5 December 2017, 6–8pm
Place: IAS Common Ground
Admission by free ticket from Eventbrite
More...

Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities: Ten workshops

Tuesday evenings (6.00pm) during term-time, 14 November 2017 to 6 February 2018, Room 215, Foster Court. More...

2017 Chinese Art Film Festival London Showcase

Modernisation and the Persistence of Traditional Values in China.
Co-organised by Shanghai Art Film Federation and SOAS China Institute. Tues–Fri during Reading Week, 7–10 October. Admission free – no registration required unless otherwise stated. More...

History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar

The uses of ox-bezoar in pre-modern Japan in ritual and medical practices.
Speaker: Dr Benedetta Lomi (University of Bristol).
Time: Tuesday 24 October 2017, 6.15pm (doors open 6pm).
Place: Wellcome Library, 183 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE.
Everyone is welcome.
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The Silent Teacher

Film screening, 18 October 2017, 7pm, IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building. European première of The Silent Teacher 那個靜默的陽光午後 (Taiwan, 2016). More...

YiMovi Exhibition of Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities


A UCL-PKU collaborative event, jointly convened by Dr Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH), Prof. Guo Liping (PKU) and Dr Daniel Vuillermin (PKU). Peking University Medical Campus, 31 May – 2 June 2017. More...

UNexpected London Chinese Short Film Festival 2017

UCL main campus 22–27 May. Short film screenings: 26–27 May. Free tickets from Eventbrite.

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MA Chinese Health & Humanity Dissertation Conference 2017

Wednesday 24 May, 2.00–5.00pm, Room 102, 23 Gordon Square.
Please do come along to support our students and find out about their fascinating research! More...

British Museum

British Museum

In March 2008 the main exhibition halls of the British Museum were furnished with a splendid array of mortuary items from the tomb of the First Emperor of China, (秦始皇帝Qin Shi Huangdi d. 210 BCE). The assembled cohort of warriors, their vivid colours now faded to reveal a monochrome clay-hued terracotta, represented a mere fraction of the acres of the army surrounding the central burial chamber, as yet to be excavated, on the outskirts of modern Xi’an. Fixed for eternity in readiness for action, their placid, rather expressionless, faces provide ample testimony to the Thearch’s anxiety to secure his protection after death, and his desire for safe passage, intact, into the realm of the immortals. As we wandered around the silent and dimly lit halls, all the lavish furnishings and entertainments he had deemed necessary to his revival formed a sombre and motionless background to what was to be a resolutely alive and interdisciplinary conference: ‘Sports, Medicine and Immortality: From Ancient China to the World Wide Web’, where the papers given that form the nucleus of a new British Museum Research Publications volume Perfect Bodies. Whether or not the First Emperor’s body and soul have found a felicitous place for revival in the afterworld, many ideas about training and preserving the perfect body that were contemporary with his lifetime remain more energetic than his warriors.


British Museum: What's on for the Olympics

Page last modified on 15 jul 12 20:11 by Penelope Barrett