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CCHH News & Events

Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture 2018

Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH) will be giving the 2nd Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture at the Needham Research Institute, Cambridge on Friday 25 May, 4pm. More...

Imagining Chinese Medicine

(edited volume, Vivienne Lo & Penelope Barrett, Brill, 2018) has now been published in Open Access. You can browse or download it at:
http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004366183
More...

MA Dissertation Conference 2018: Transnational Studies and Chinese Health & Humanity

Wednesday 23 May, 09.00–13.00, Room 101, 16–18 Gordon Square.
Please come along to support our wonderful students and find out about the breathtaking range of their research! More...

Chinese Visual Festival 2018

Don't miss the 2018 edition of the excellent Chinese Visual Festival – on at KCL and BFI Southbank from 3rd to 6th May before transferring to Edinburgh Filmhouse for 11th–14th May.
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China’s visual cultures and the Medical and Health Humanities: launch event

Monday 21 May 2018, 6-9pm, IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building. Admission by free ticket:
https://cchh-book-website-launch.eventbrite.co.uk
More...

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, CERA-UK Annual Conference 2018

Chinese Education in Global Contexts: Researching the Local, the Global and the ‘Glocal’, 14–15 June 2018, UCL Institute of Education (IoE). Deadline for abstract submission: 15th April 2018. More...

PKU-UCL inter-university module in the Cross-Cultural Health Humanities

An inter-university module in the Cross Cultural Medical/Health Humanities, taught by historians, philosophers and global health specialists from PKU and UCL, will run this week at the Yenching Academy of Peking University.
More...

YiMovi website – live now!

Our new website YiMovi/医学仁康: Chinese film and the cross-cultural Medical Humanities – is live now at yimovi.com. More...

British Museum

British Museum

In March 2008 the main exhibition halls of the British Museum were furnished with a splendid array of mortuary items from the tomb of the First Emperor of China, (秦始皇帝Qin Shi Huangdi d. 210 BCE). The assembled cohort of warriors, their vivid colours now faded to reveal a monochrome clay-hued terracotta, represented a mere fraction of the acres of the army surrounding the central burial chamber, as yet to be excavated, on the outskirts of modern Xi’an. Fixed for eternity in readiness for action, their placid, rather expressionless, faces provide ample testimony to the Thearch’s anxiety to secure his protection after death, and his desire for safe passage, intact, into the realm of the immortals. As we wandered around the silent and dimly lit halls, all the lavish furnishings and entertainments he had deemed necessary to his revival formed a sombre and motionless background to what was to be a resolutely alive and interdisciplinary conference: ‘Sports, Medicine and Immortality: From Ancient China to the World Wide Web’, where the papers given that form the nucleus of a new British Museum Research Publications volume Perfect Bodies. Whether or not the First Emperor’s body and soul have found a felicitous place for revival in the afterworld, many ideas about training and preserving the perfect body that were contemporary with his lifetime remain more energetic than his warriors.


British Museum: What's on for the Olympics

Page last modified on 15 jul 12 20:11 by Penelope Barrett