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CCHH: China Centre For Health And Humanity

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Reconstruction of a silk manuscript on therapeutic exercise.

Image: Reconstruction of a silk manuscript on therapeutic exercise. Mawangdui tomb 3, Hunan c. 168 BCE

CCHH is the home for teaching about China, her health and humanity at graduate level. We also offer one undergraduate option. We aim to provide a friendly and challenging environment where students from all parts of the world, and particularly from China, will have the opportunity to develop and reflect upon their ideas together with experts from all over UCL and SOAS.

For more information please contact Dr Vivienne Lo: ucgavlo@gmail.com Department of History, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT

HMED3014: History of Asian Medicine
This course aims to provide knowledge of the background and development of key concepts and practices in the history of Chinese medicine, with a secondary focus on the history of Tibetan medicine. It will describe the transmissions of these Asian medical systems and traditions to Europe and the practice of traditional medicine in the modern world. The course will give a broad historical perspective, whilst at the same time focusing on the social, cultural and political contexts of key times of medical innovation. (1/2 unit).

HIST6110: Ancient and Medieval China [and her neighbours] ca 1600 BCE - 979 CE
This year sees the first UCL Undergraduate course on the History and Culture of Ancient and Medieval China. This is a survey course, which will provide an overview of the political, social and cultural history of the territories that we now know as China. From the ancient world of the Shang people, through the foundations of empire, and its north-south fracture under nomadic rule, to the cosmopolitan culture of  medieval times, the centralising narrative of an unbroken Chinese civilisation will be questioned.  Lectures will focus on the diversity revealed by archaeological evidence, the impact of the Han history makers and their myths of the culture bringers, the coming of Indian Buddhism, and trade, travel and religion along the Silk Routes. In this way, we will learn about the changing lives of those inhabitants of the Yellow and Yangzi River areas and the North China plain, and how they were affected by surrounding cultural areas.