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Current PhD vacancies are listed below. See the postgraduate pages for more information on our PhD programmes.

A fully funded 3-year PhD studentship is available in the Department of Chemistry. This studentship is not linked to a specific project, but is an opportunity for talented students to develop their own project in collaboration with one or more of the PhD supervisors in the Department (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/people/academic-staff). Applicants should initially contact potential PhD supervisors to check whether they participate in this scheme. They need to contact their supervisors with a covering letter and CV (including contact details for 2 referees) together with 2 or more titles for their proposed PhD projects in collaboration with different PhD supervisors. If supervisors confirm that they are willing to take the applicant to their research group, applicants should send their applications by email to y.moscou@ucl.ac.uk and complete the electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply.

Applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. They should be self-motivated and have excellent experimental skills. Good communication skills (both presentation and writing skills in English) are also essential.

The deadline for applications is 15th January 2018. Any queries regarding the studentship scheme should be directed to f.l.gervasio@ucl.ac.uk.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018.

Wellcome Trust 4-year PhD Interdisciplinary Programme in Structural, Computational and Chemical Biology

Studentships available for 2017/18 entry

 

Applications for Wellcome Trust PhD Programme studentships are now open. Please read the instructions for applicants carefully to ensure that you submit a completed application.

 

Deadline for applications: Friday 6 January 2017

Shortlisting: Tuesday 17 January 2017

Interviews: Thursday 26 and Friday 27 January 2017

Details of how to apply are available here.

 

Further information

 

To discuss the programme informally please contact the Programme Coordinator, Professor Alethea Tabor.

A fully funded 3-year PhD studentship is available in UCL Chemistry to work on a highly interdisciplinary project in the groups of Dr Vijay Chudasama (60%) and Dr Gemma-Louise Davies (40%). Please visit our group websites for more details about our research: http://chudasama-group.eu/ and https://gemmalouisedavies.com/

The project will involve: (i) the synthesis of small molecules and their application in the site-selective modification of proteins, (ii) the development of nanostructured materials as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and (iii) the controlled attachment of the site-selectively modified proteins onto the surface of the nanostructured material. The aim is to target the MRI contrast agents to specific disease targets using state-of-the-art bioconjugation chemistry. The student will gain expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, bioconjugation, inorganic nanoparticle synthetic techniques, and the use of a variety of analytical techniques, including, but not limited to, mass spectrometry, ELISAs, SPR, relaxometry, clinical MRI and electron microscopy.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject and the ability to think analytically and creatively. An enquiring and rigorous approach to research as well as good team-working, observational and communication skills (both presentation and writing skills in English) are also essential. Previous research experience in contributing to a collaborative interdisciplinary research environment is highly desirable but not essential, as training will be provided. UCL offers a world leading scientific environment in the heart of London.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 31st January 2018, with interviews to be held in February, but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Chudasama (v.chudasama@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk.

A fully funded 3-year PhD studentship is available in the Department of Chemistry to work on a collaborative project entitled the ‘Upgrading of Lignin to Chiral Synthons’ with Professor Helen Hailes and Dr Tom Sheppard. For further details about our research see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/people/helen-hailes and www.tomsheppard.eu

To ensure that we have a sustainable chemical industry, it is essential that alternative renewable starting materials are used for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The richest sustainable source of aromatic compounds is lignin, however the efficient conversion of lignin into aromatic synthons is still a major challenge. This project will develop new routes for the selective modification of lignin to provide access to valuable chiral compounds via sustainable chemistries. It will involve the development of methodology to cleave key lignin C-O ether bonds, and introduce nucleophilic groups. Fragments will then be used with a range of biocatalytic enzymes including our available transaminases, transketolases, norcoclaurine synthases, and alcohol dehydrogenases. Products will be characterised and the absolute stereochemistries of products determined. This PhD project will open up the possibility of synthesizing many new compounds using sustainable building blocks and reagents, via concise approaches with low environmental impact. The student will gain expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, enzyme expression, biocatalysis, and the use of a variety of analytical and characterisation techniques, such as HPLC, GC, and NMR spectroscopy.

Applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. They should be self-motivated, be keen to work on a collaborative interdisciplinary project and have excellent experimental skills. Good communication skills (both presentation and writing skills in English) are also essential. UCL offers a world leading scientific environment in the heart of London. Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 9th January 2018, but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (covering letter and CV including contact details for 2 referees) by email to professor Helen Hailes (h.c.hailes@ucl.ac.uk). Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk.

A fully funded 3 year PhD studentship is available in the Department of Chemistry at UCL working on an interdisciplinary project in the groups of Dr Matthew Blunt and Dr Katherine Holt. Please visit our group websites for more details about our research: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/people/matthew-blunt and http://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/people/katherine-holt

New nano-structured materials offer some of the best potential solutions to the environmental challenges facing our society. In particular, molecular frameworks have been the focus of recent research efforts as new catalyst or electrode materials. Two-dimensional covalent-organic frameworks (2D-COFs) consisting of metalloporphyrin molecules have already been shown to be effective electro-catalysts for environmentally important reactions such as the reduction of carbon dioxide. This project will involve (i) the synthesis of metalloporphyrin containing 2D-COF thin films on a range of different graphitic substrates; (ii) the structural and chemical analysis of these materials on the macro and nanoscale using a variety of analytical techniques; and (iii) the use of electrochemical STM to investigate electrochemical processes occurring in metalloporphyrin 2D-COFs at the molecular level. The aims of this project are to develop synthesis methods for controlling the arrangement of coordinated metal ions within a porphyrin molecular framework and to understand how this arrangement influences the nanoscale redox properties of these materials for environmentally important reactions. The student will gain expertise in materials synthesis, scanning probe microscopy, electrochemical analysis and a range of other materials characterisation techniques including, but not limited to, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); transmission electron microscopy (TEM); powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD); and Raman spectroscopy.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject and the ability to think analytically and creatively. An enquiring and rigorous approach to research, the ability to work well in a team, observational and communication skills (both presentation and writing skills in English) are all essential. Previous research experience of contributing to a collaborative interdisciplinary research environment is highly desirable but not essential, as training will be provided.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Blunt (m.blunt@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries.
Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 12th January 2018, with interviews to be held in February, but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

A fully funded PhD studentship is available within the UCL Department of Chemistry to work under the supervision of Prof. Giuseppe Battaglia (http://www.battagliaresearchgroup.org) and Dr. Giorgio Volpe (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/anslab) on the experimental study and development of novel light-activated chemotactic nanosystems capable of autonomous movement to localise, pick up, and deliver nanoscopic objects. This project is relevant for several applications ranging from catalysis and energy conversion to bioremediation, chemical sensing and drug delivery.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related subject, e.g. Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science or Engineering and an interest in working at the interface between nanophotonics and biophysics. Previous experimental experience in nanotechnology or photonics is desirable but not essential, as training will be provided.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 8 January 2018, although the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr. Giuseppe Battaglia (g.battaglia@ucl.ac.uk) and Dr. Giorgio Volpe (g.volpe@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries.

Applicants will also be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to the postgraduate administrator Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

A fully funded (39 month) PhD studentship is available in UCL Chemistry to work on a project Designing Transparent Oxide Thermoelectrics supervised by Dr Robert Palgrave and Dr David Scanlon.

As the global demand for energy grows, renewable energy production is becoming increasingly important. Thermoelectrics (TEs) allow us to generate electrical power from a temperature gradient using a phenomenon called the Seebeck Effect. Most established TE materials have small band gap, and contain heavy, rare or toxic elements, e.g. PbTe and Bi2Te3. The discovery of a high performance transparent oxide TE would open up new fields of research in a range of novel applications such as smart windows (or screens) with energy harvesting, cooling and thermal sensing functionalities. This is a combined experimental and computational project, and the student will be trained in both aspects. In this project we will synthesise and test new candidate transparent oxide TEs; our selection of synthetic targets will be informed both by state of the art computational materials design and experimental characterisation. We will screen oxides with low lattice thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity for transparent TE capabilities.

The successful candidate will work with state of the art synthesis, characterisation and computational methods on a topic of intense current interest worldwide. At the end of the project the student will be equipped with a unique set of highly sought after skills in both synthetic and analytical chemistry and computational modelling. The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest in materials chemistry, self-motivation and have the ability to think analytically and creatively. An enquiring and rigorous approach to research as well as good team-working and communication skills (both presentation and written English) are essential.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 31 January 2018, although the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Robert Palgrave or Dr David Scanlon (r.palgrave@ucl.ac.uk or d.scanlon@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries. Applicants will also be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to the postgraduate administrator Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

A fully funded (3 years) PhD studentship is available in UCL Chemistry to work on the project entitled “Bridging magnetic and electronic structure techniques via atomistic approaches” supervised by Dr Scott Woodley and Prof Andrew Wills. The work will involve three aspects: (i) DFT calculations studying magnetic ordering in a small unit cell aimed at obtaining parameters of magnetic interactions that will be used in (ii) magnetic Monte Carlo simulations that will aim to derive order parameter information from model Hamiltonians and the experimental data; and (iii) atomistic GULP simulations of the two pure systems including both types of interactions. When major model parameters have been established, the work will be moved to the solid solution and construction of the corresponding phase diagram. The ability to predict phase diagrams of industrially relevant magnetic materials will be a breakthrough and, therefore, a success in this project would generate high impact publications and software. Depending on the candidate’s strengths and interests, the project can involve development of models and software.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Physical Chemistry or Chemical Physics, Computational Chemistry or Physics, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in materials chemistry and have the ability to think analytically and creatively. An enquiring and rigorous approach to research, as well as good team-working and communication skills (both presentation and written English), is essential. Good mathematical knowledge is essential and programming experience is desirable.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The earliest this position will be offered is 31st January 2018 and will remain open until a suitable candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Scott Woodley ( Scott.Woodley@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries. Applicants will also be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to the postgraduate administrator Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

A 3.5-year PhD studentship in recombination processes in organic photovoltaic materials (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Application deadline: 30 June 2018

Start Date: 24 September 2018

Location: London (1.5 years), Singapore (2 years)

Topics: spectroscopy, modelling, solar energy

The Studentship

This position is fully funded by the UCL-A*STAR Collaborative Programme via the Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science (M3S CDT) at UCL. The student will be registered for a PhD at UCL where he/she will spend year 1 and the first six months of year 4. The second and third years of the PhD will be spent at the A*STAR IHPC in Singapore. The Studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £17,050 (tax free) pro rata in years 1 and 4. During years 2 and 3, the student will receive a full stipend directly from A*STAR. In addition, A*STAR will provide the student with one-off relocation allowance. Please note that, due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU citizens are eligible for this studentship.

The Project

Solar energy, a promising alternative to the non-renewable sources primarily used today, is a rapidly growing industry. Low-cost, easily-processable organic photovoltaics (OPV) may potentially have a substantial share of this market. However, OPV is still in its infancy and although commercialisation has begun, many barriers to its success still exist. Primarily, this is due to relatively low power conversion efficiencies, caused by loss mechanisms such as bimolecular recombination. Bimolecular recombination is a process by which opposing charge carriers recombine back to the ground state before they have a chance to reach the contacts and produce electricity.

This project will combine two complementary techniques to measure and analyse recombination in organic photovoltaic blends: laser transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and computational modelling. This project will therefore involve measuring the recombination of different polymer/fullerene blends possessing varying degrees of non-Langevin characteristics using TAS. The recombination processes will subsequently be modelled computationally in order to assess and analyse the experimental behaviour. The overall aim is to establish whether the creation of an easily dissociable charge transfer state during recombination is the origin of supressed bimolecular recombination, a rare but highly desirable behaviour that enables substantially more efficient solar cells.

The Candidate

The successful applicant should have or expect to achieve at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent for undergraduate degree in Chemistry, Physics or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject, good experimental practice and the ability to think analytically and creatively. Good computer skills, plus good presentation and writing skills in English, are required.

Please contact Dr Tracey Clarke (tracey.clarke@ucl.ac.uk) or Dr Michael Sullivan (Michael@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg) for further details or to express an interest.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Supervisors: Dr Tracey Clarke (UCL), Dr Michael Sullivan (IHPC, A*STAR, Singapore)

A 3.5-year PhD studentship in Artificial Enzymes based on Metal-Containing Molecular Containers (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Supervisors: Dr. Tung Chun Lee (UCL), Dr. Shiqiang Bai (IMRE, A*STAR) Closing Date for Applications: 30 June 2018 Start Date: 24 September 2018 Location: London (1.5 years), Singapore (2 years) Topics: nanomaterials, catalysis, reaction mechanism, supramolecular chemistry, host-guest complexes

The Studentship

This position is fully funded by the UCL-A*STAR Collaborative Programme via the Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science (M3S CDT) at UCL. The student will be registered for a PhD at UCL where he/she will spend year 1 and the first six months of year 4. The second and third years of the PhD will be spent at the A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) in Singapore. The Studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £17,050 (tax free) pro rata in years 1 and 4. During years 2 and 3, the student will receive a full stipend directly from A*STAR. In addition, A*STAR will provide the student with one-off relocation allowance. Please note that, due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU citizens are eligible for this studentship.

The Project

Enzymes are known to speed up a wide variety of chemical reactions through encapsulating small molecular species into their nanoscale cavities (a.k.a. the enzymatic pockets) and in many cases stabilising the transition states of a reaction via metal-ligand interactions at the active sites. Our group has demonstrated that the nanoscale cavities of artificial molecular containers (cucurbit[n]urils CBn) can mediate cascades of chemical reactions, analogous to enzymatic pockets.[1] Owing to their well-defined and controllable molecular structures, CBs can serve as an excellent model system for studying enzymatic and other inner-phase reactions, as well as for designing more efficient catalysts.

This PhD project aims to develop novel catalysts that mimic the function of enzymes, which will synergise with other experimental and modelling effort led by the Lee group. In particular, highly selective and efficient catalysts will be achieved by combining the molecular recognition properties of CBs with the catalytic properties of transition metal ions, metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots. The project aims to develop a molecular toolbox that enables bespoke catalysts to be assembled through a mix-and-match approach, and to deliver fundamental insights into reaction mechanisms within a nano-confined environment.

Please visit the group website for more details about our research: http://tungchunlee.weebly.com/

[1] “Chemistry inside molecular containers in the gas phase”, Nat. Chem., 2013, 5, 376–382.

The Candidate

The successful applicant should have or expect to achieve a 1st or 2:1 class integrated Masters degree (MEng, MSci, MChem etc.) in Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject, good experimental practice and the ability to think analytically and creatively. Good computer skills, plus good presentation and writing skills in English, are required. Previous research experience in contributing to a collaborative interdisciplinary research environment is highly desirable but not necessary as training will be provided. Please contact Dr. Tung Chun Lee (tungchun.lee@ucl.ac.uk) for further details or to express an interest.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

A 3.5-year PhD studentship in development of flexible sensor material for wound management and detection of infectious agents in skin using bio-optical methods (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Closing Date for Applications: 30 June 2018 Start Date: 24 September 2018 Location: London (1.5 years), Singapore (2 years)

Topics: Materials Chemistry, Analytic Chemistry, New Biological sensors

The Studentship

This position is fully funded by the UCL-A*STAR Collaborative Programme via the Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science (M3S CDT) at UCL. The student will be registered for a PhD at UCL where he/she will spend year 1 and the first six months of year 4. The second and third years of the PhD will be spent at the Biomedical Sciences Institute, A*STAR in Singapore. The Studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £17,050 (tax free) pro rata in years 1 and 4. During years 2 and 3, the student will receive a full stipend directly from A*STAR. In addition, A*STAR will provide the student with one-off relocation allowance. Please note that, due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU citizens are eligible for this studentship.

The Project

Detection of wound biomarkers and infection due to bacteria is of paramount interest in wound care management. Detection of these biomarkers at early stage will give direction in estimating a wound is healing or non-healing. Additionally, monitoring of pressure, temperature and humidity near the wound area, which makes it capable of overall wound management. In this context, we propose the development of a flexible and stretchable sensor for the continuous monitoring of these biomarkers and bacteria using bio-optical methods such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) along with various colorimetric methods. The eye-catching significance of SERS for sensing is realized by its ability to generate giant enhancement for the unique vibrational ‘fingerprint’ Raman spectra when the analyte molecules are adsorbed onto nano-roughened metal surfaces of silver/gold or their colloidal nanoparticles. This leads to unprecedented sensitivity in detection along with the possibility for multiplexed detection. Similarly SPR offers tremendous potential for studying the bimolecular interaction and kinetics on a plasmonic platform.

The possible materials for stretchable and flexible sensor would be biocompatible hydrogels or elastomeric membranes which will have the capability to form a conformal contact with any uneven surfaces on the body. A hybrid elastomer-hydrogel type material would be highly desirable as it can mimic mammalian skin like property in terms of such as elastomer like “epidermis” and hydrogel like “dermis” with robust interfaces. For the sensor readout, novel SERS/SPR based sensing method could be used along with monitoring the colorimetric visualization of the pH condition to identify the stage of wound healing. The fabrication process makes use of E-beam evaporator or Sputtering to generating novel highly sensitive plasmonic substrate.

The aim of the project is to optimize the nanostructure design and its biocompatibility for continuous monitoring of the markers as a wearable, which will open up new regime in this arena.

The Candidate

The successful applicant should have or expect to achieve a 1st or 2:1 class integrated Masters degree (MEng, MSci, MChem etc.) in Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject, good experimental practice and the ability to think analytically and creatively. Good presentation and writing skills in English, are required. Previous research experience in contributing to a collaborative interdisciplinary research environment is highly desirable but not necessary as training will be provided. Please contact Professor Ivan Parkin (i.p.parkin@ucl.ac.uk) or Dr Ioannnis Papakonstantinou (i.papakonstantinou@ucl.ac.uk) for further details or to express an interest.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Supervisors: Professor Ivan Parkin (UCL); Dr Ioannnis Papakonstantinou (UCL), Professor Malini Olivo (BSI, A*STAR, Singapore)

A 4-year EngD studentship in Surfaces for Green Hydrogen Production (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Supervisor: Professor Geoff Thornton, UCL

Application deadline: 30 June 2018

Start date: 24 September 2018

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £18550 (tax free) for four years.

The project will be in collaboration with SABIC. The student will carry out his/her doctoral research at UCL and also have the opportunity for work placements at SABIC@KAUST.

Titania has been widely explored as a photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic material for many years. Nevertheless, an atomistic understanding of the key processes that limit performance is still lacking. The Thornton group have recently determined the structure of the TiO2(110) interface with liquid water using surface X-ray diffraction and the TiO2(110) interfaces with 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl. For the TiO2(110)/water interface, the results were recently published in Nature Materials. The electrolyte results indicate ordering in the contact layer. The aim of the proposed project is two fold: to take this further and investigate the structure of the interface under photoelectrochemical control and to explore the effect of a rutile/anatase interface on the photocatalytic performance. The candidate will join an exciting team in a dynamic research environment at UCL associated with the Thornton Group at UCL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/research/research-groups/group-folder/nan....

Interested candidates should contact g.thornton@ucl.ac.uk with a degree transcript and a motivation letter expressing interest in this project. Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or related subject ideally with some experience of surface science techniques.

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK. .

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.

A fully funded PhD studentship is available within the UCL Department of Chemistry to work under the supervision of Dr Derek Macmillan in the area of glycoprotein synthesis using a combination of synthetic and biological components.

We have much experience in the semi-synthesis of site-specifically glycosylated peptides and proteins, and will target therapeutic protein hormones in initial proof of concept studies. Simply glycosylated peptides and proteins will be elaborated enzymatically using synthetic and/or biologically derived oligosaccharides. The project will further involve the study and development of synthetic methodology developed in our group to activate glycopeptide “building blocks” for transformation into complex proteins using chemoselective ligation reactions. This PhD project offers the potential to synthesise valuable therapeutic peptides and proteins in a sustainable and commercially viable fashion. The student will gain expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, enzyme expression, biotransformation, and the use of a variety of analytical and characterisation techniques including HPLC, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related subject, e.g. Medicinal Chemistry Biochemistry, or Chemical biology. Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 9 February 2018, although the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Derek Macmillan (d.macmillan@ucl.ac.uk) who may also be approached for informal enquiries.

Applicants will also be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to the postgraduate administrator Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

Supervisor: Professor P V Coveney, UCL

Application deadline: 31 January 2018

Start date: 24 September 2018

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £18550 (tax free) for four years.

The project will involve a collaboration with Hexcel (http://www.hexcel.com) whose laboratories are in close proximity to UCL. Hexcel will be able to perform a range of performance tests on the same materials as the student will be modelling, thereby providing experimental validation of the theoretical and simulation work. The overarching goal for this work is to assess the accuracy, precision and reliability of such computer-based predictions of the properties of these nanomaterials.

The student will develop and refine the multiscale modelling methodologies required to investigate polymer nanocomposites with particular focus on epoxy – resins. These composite materials are expected to exhibit properties of importance to aerospace industries owing to their anticipated properties (lightweight, strong, durable, as well as being environmentally friendly and sustainable). While the student will need to perform some amount of electronic structure calculations in order to extract certain key parameters (pertaining to charge distributions and dispersion interactions), he or she will employ a combination of modelling methods, primarily focussed at the level of classical molecular dynamics (both all atom and coarse-grainded) and its connections to higher levels of modelling in order to make predictions of large scale materials properties. The central theme for the project is to make high fidelity, chemically specific predictions from the nanoscale description of both the mesoscale structure of these composites, and from that to predict emergent macroscopic behaviour and properties. These predictions will be tested against experimental measurements made by Hexcel specifically for the purpose of validating the student’s modelling results.

Interested candidates should contact p.v.coveney@ucl.ac.uk with a degree transcript and a motivation letter expressing interest in this project. Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or related subject ideally must be able to demonstrate significant computational experience including use of high level programming languages (such as Fortran, C/C++, and Python or other scripting methods).

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK.

Applications will be accepted until 31 January 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.

 

Advanced synthesus and characterisation of a novel class of lubricants (30 Juune 2018)

Supervisor: Dr Robert Palgrave, UCL

Application deadline: 30 June 2018

Start date: 24 September 2018

Subject areas Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded 4-year EngD studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £18550 (tax free) for four years.

The project will develop a completely new class of high-performance lubricants for pump technology in collaboration with Edwards Vacuum, a world leader in vacuum systems. The student will carry out his/her doctoral research at UCL supervised by Dr. Robert Palgrave, and will also have the opportunity for work placements at Edwards. Vacuum technology enables many of the engineering and scientific advances that are transforming our world. In this project you will work with Edwards to pioneer an entirely new class of lubricant that could revolutionise the vacuum industry. This project would suit a candidate with a background in chemistry, chemical engineering or mechanical engineering who is keen to work on an industrially relevant project. It will involve chemical synthesis of a new class of lubricants with exceptional properties, as well as detailed characterisation using NMR, XPS and tribological measurements.

The project will aim to deploy the new lubricants into working prototype pumps and rapidly transfer the technology into real vacuum systems. The successful candidate will join a dynamic research environment at UCL working in both the Departments of Chemistry and Mechanical Engineering, and will receive training in advanced synthesis and characterisation techniques, as well as experience of developing a new product from concept to prototype and beyond with a world leading engineering company. The skills learned would be invaluable for a career in academia or industry. Further information can be found at the following websites:

www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/postgraduate/engd and www.edwardsvacuum.com/about-us/

Interested candidates should contact Dr. Robert Palgrave (r.palgrave@ucl.ac.uk). Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree.

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.

The design and synthesis of bioconjugated organic semiconductors for photoacoustic imaging applications (application deadline: 15 June 2018)

A fully funded 3-year PhD studentship is available at UCL Chemistry to work on an interdisciplinary project in the group of Dr Bob C. Schroeder. The project will involve the design and synthesis of bioconjugated organic semiconductors for photoacoustic imaging applications. Photoacoustic imaging is a biomedical imaging technique based on the photoacoustic effect; the emission of sound waves (commonly ultrasound) by a material, following its prior stimulation by light. The method is particularly interesting for biomedical imaging, given its non-evasive nature and the intrinsically low scattering of ultrasound waves in biological tissues, allowing for high spatial resolution images. The student will gain expertise in heterocyclic chemistry, polymer synthesis and nanoparticle fabrication, as well as being trained in the use of a variety of analytical techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, and electron microscopy.

Please visit our group website for more details about our research: www.schroedergroup.org

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least 2.1 honours or equivalent at Bachelors or Masters level in Chemistry, or a related discipline. The successful applicant will demonstrate strong interest and self-motivation in the subject and the ability to think analytically and creatively. An enquiring and rigorous approach to research as well as excellent team-working, observational and communication skills (both presentation and writing skills in English) are also essential. Previous research experience in contributing to a collaborative interdisciplinary research environment would be highly desirable but not essential, as training will be provided. UCL offers a world-leading scientific environment in the heart of London.

Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students who meet the 3 years residency criteria are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is the 24th September 2018. The deadline for applications is 15th June 2018, with interviews to be held in late June/early July, but the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Schroeder (b.c.schroeder@ucl.ac.uk), who may also be approached for informal enquiries.

Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

Probing novel doping mechanisms for high mobility transparent conductiong oxides (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Start date: 24 September 2018

Supervisor: Dr David O. Scanlon, UCL

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £18550 (tax free) for four years.

The project will be in collaboration with Diamond Light Source Ltd, the UK’s national Synchrotron. The student will carry out his/her doctoral research jointly at UCL and at Diamond.

Transparent Conducting Oxides (TCOs) have become ubiquitous in our everyday lives, and are commonly used as transparent electrodes in devices such as solar cells, flat panel displays and light emitting diodes, and as coatings in energy efficient low-emissivity windows. As you read this on your phone/tablet/laptop you are looking at a TCO! This project is focussed on using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy to study novel dopants in TCOs, in an effort to find systems that show improved performance over the current industry standard. Prospective students will join the Scanlon Materials Theory Group at UCL, where we have 10 years of experience of using DFT to understand defect processes in TCOs, and the student will be part of a multi-group project to experimentally and computationally study these system, in collaboration with a large industry partner. Successful candidates will split their time between UCL’s Bloomsbury Campus and Diamond Light Source, at the Harwell Campus in Oxfordshire. This represents a unique opportunity to be trained in state of the art calculations, in addition to learning about ground breaking x-ray spectroscopy.

Interested candidates should contact Dr David Scanlon (d.scanlon@ucl.ac.uk) with a degree transcript and a motivation letter expressing interest in this project. Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or related subject.

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.

Developing a methodology to distinguish the morphology of supported metal oxides using high impact synchroton and lab-based techniques (application deadline: 30 june 2018)

Supervisor: Andrew Beale, Ines Lezcano-Gonzalez UCL

Start date: 24 September 2018

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend £18550 (tax free) for four years.

The project will be in collaboration with Diamond Light Source (Dr Andy Smith) and Johnson Matthey Plc (Drs Husn Islam, Loredana Matarosie and David Thompsett) The student will carry out his/her doctoral research at the Research Complex at Harwell but where required will also conduct some of the project at both Diamond Light Source and Johnson Matthey Plc.

The aim of the project is to identify and develop a methodology to distinguish the morphology of supported metal oxides using SAXS as a primary analytical technique.

Supported metal oxides are essential catalytic components in automotive after-treatment technologies. In response to growing health concerns, and as a result of recent scandals regarding vehicle emissions testing, European governments have greatly accelerated tightening measures through legislation by introducing “Real Driving Emissions” testing. This has led to a pressing need to understand and improve after-treatment catalysts for the market, with the ultimate goal of reducing harmful vehicle emissions and improving quality of life.

Characteristics of the supported metal oxide have a marked effect on catalytic performance; these characteristics, however, prove challenging to identify due to the complex nature of this class of materials.

A PhD project is expected to excel understanding of supported metal oxides by developing a methodology for data acquisition and analysis which will reveal key structural traits on a case by case basis. Once a methodology is established on model systems, a set of operando experiments will be performed to test the methodology under challenging conditions, and gain insight into supported metal oxide structure during synthesis and catalysis. Several high impact synchrotron and lab-based techniques will be used in this project including SAXS, XAS, CO-chemisorption, and TEM/SEM to gain a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic systems.

The SAXS beamline I22 at Diamond Light Source is integral to the proposed project. Key to the PhD is to fine-tune the technique to acquire data on these challenging systems, and to create an analysis protocol which is both meaningful and versatile to cover a range of material structures. This is of interest to Diamond and UCL as the capabilities that we propose to develop have not been reported in literature, thus potentially making both institutes leading experts in the field, both for data acquisition and for data handling.

For Johnson Matthey, methodology developed through the project is likely to be brought into standard protocol for catalyst design, thus improving the research and development process for industrial catalysts, ultimately leading to better vehicular emission control on the road.

Interested candidates should contact (Andrew.beale@ucl.ac.uk) with a degree transcript and a motivation letter expressing interest in this project. Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree or equivalent in physics, chemistry or related subject ideally with some experience of catalyst preparation and/or catalyst testing and/or X-ray scattering techniques.

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.

Innovative techniques for production of nanomaterials for thermoelectric devices (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of developing thermal energy coatings and nanomaterials. Specifically, the student will make, characterise and test thermoelectric materials and devices as well as new nanoparticle based heat transfer fluids, leading to the award of a PhD degree. Thermoelectric materials can be used to convert thermal energy in to electricity or vice versa, through the thermoelectric effect. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate). The position linked to the EPSRC funded energy materials hub, JUICED (Joint University-Industry Consortium for Energy Materials and Devices). JUICED is a consortium of four collaborating Universities, UCL, Southampton, Birmingham and Loughborough, which aims to contribute towards making the UK a world leader of energy materials and devices. A summary of the hub can be found using the link: www.ucl.ac.uk/chemistry/juiced

The research will involve the production, characterisation and testing of nanomaterials using a variety of methods including chemical vapour deposition, solid state methods and continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis. The position requires a large amount of collaborative work with other teams within UCL and at partner Universities. The target materials will be designed with specific compositions and surface coatings in order to affect their properties in the desired applications. The work will be principally experimental, involving the use of key analytical methods for inorganic materials, e.g. powder XRD, BET surface area, Raman spectroscopy, etc. Detailed X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) will form part of the project, with access to national facilities based in Harwell, Oxfordshire. The structure/property relationships of the nanomaterials will be identified, leading to improved and novel materials. 

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at UCL. You will have a 1st class or 2:1 honours degree (or equivalent) in chemistry, or materials science, chemical engineering, or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Training will be given in synthesis, characterisation and testing, and investigative techniques including electron microscopy. Good team-working, observational, communication and time management skills are essential. A high degree of collaborative work tackling important, interdisciplinary and industry focused science is being undertaken in the laboratory, which provides a highly stimulating environment in which to work.

UCL and the JUICED project provide an inclusive and stimulating environment to pursue research. Due to funding restrictions only UK/EU residents are eligible to apply for this position. We welcome applications from all eligible researchers regardless of gender, age, ethnicity and social background. Successful applicants must meet UCL's minimum language requirements before starting their studies. The start date of the studentship is 24 September 2018. The application deadline is 30 June 2018 but the position will be closed as soon as the suitable applicant has been selected.

For further details of the post contact Liam McCafferty: l.mccafferty@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 76794312. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr. McCafferty. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at UCL in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Glycoprotein synthesis using a combination of synthetics and biological components (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

A fully funded PhD studentship is available within the UCL Department of Chemistry to work under the supervision of Dr Derek Macmillan in the area of glycoprotein synthesis using a combination of synthetic and biological components.

We have much experience in the semi-synthesis of site-specifically glycosylated peptides and proteins, and will target therapeutic protein hormones in initial proof of concept studies. Simply glycosylated peptides and proteins will be elaborated enzymatically using synthetic and/or biologically derived oligosaccharides. The project will further involve the study and development of synthetic methodology developed in our group to activate glycopeptide “building blocks” for transformation into complex proteins using chemoselective ligation reactions. This PhD project offers the potential to synthesise valuable therapeutic peptides and proteins in a sustainable and commercially viable fashion. The student will gain expertise in synthetic organic chemistry, enzyme expression, biotransformation, and the use of a variety of analytical and characterisation techniques including HPLC, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy.

The applicants should have, or expect to gain, at least a 2.1 honours or equivalent at Masters level in Chemistry, or a related subject, e.g. Medicinal Chemistry Biochemistry, or Chemical biology. Due to funding restrictions, only UK/EU students are eligible for this studentship. The start date for the PhD is in late September 2018. The deadline for applications is 30 June 2018, although the position will be filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is found.

Applicants should send their applications (motivation letter, CV and contact info for 2 referees) by email to Dr Derek Macmillan (d.macmillan@ucl.ac.uk) who may also be approached for informal enquiries.

Applicants will also be required to complete an electronic application form at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply. Any admissions queries should be directed to the postgraduate administrator Dr Jadranka Butorac (j.butorac@ucl.ac.uk).

Using Magnetic Resonance to Detect and Analyse Nerve Agent Adducts (application deadline: 30 June 2018)

Supervisor:  Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, UCL 

The UCL Centre for Doctoral Training in Molecular Modelling and Materials Science is offering a fully funded studentship to a highly motivated candidate to start in September 2018. The studentship will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate plus a maintenance stipend for four years.

The project will be in collaboration with Dr Rebecca Williams, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), UK. The student will carry out his/her doctoral research at UCL ad also have to opportunity for work placements at DSTL, UK.

General project description: Organophosphorus nerve agents have been used in chemical warfare for >50 years. Recent developments in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography have demonstrated the identification of nerve agent adducts in blood, urine and hair, however significant work-up of samples for this technique can be time consuming. The use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify the presence of such nerve agent adducts in patient samples could revolutionise their detection and avoid the need for significant sample processing. In this project, commonly-used clinical MRI contrast agents will be evaluated as ligating agents to nerve agent adducts, e.g. sarin-tyrosine. Changing MRI signal upon coordination to the nerve agent will provide clear and strong evidence for positive nerve agent detection.

Interested candidates should contact Dr Gemma-Louise Davies (gemma-louise.davies@ucl.ac.uk) with a degree transcript and a motivation letter expressing interest in this project. Informal inquiries are encouraged. The applicants should have, or be expecting to achieve, a first or upper second class Honours degree or equivalent in chemistry or related subject ideally with some experience of inorganic chemistry synthesis and materials chemistry analytical techniques.

Due to funding restrictions, this studentship is only open to applicants from the UK and EU, who have been resident in the UK for at least 3 years preceding their start on the programme or have indefinite leave to remain in the UK. Applicants will be required to undergo a security check prior to starting.

Applications will be accepted until 30 June 2018 but the position will be filled as soon as a suitable candidate has been identified.