XClose

Centre for Translation Studies

Home
Menu

CenTraS

Student on bench by Portico columns

Study

Postgraduate studies include taught programmes with specialised pathways at MA or MSc level and a PhD programme for research students. CenTraS also offers a wide range of high-quality short courses for professional development.

Book pages and spine

Research

Find out more about our research activity which focuses on specialisms such as translation theory, metaphor in translation, theatre translation, specialised translation, audiovisual translation, translation technology, intercultural interaction and interpreting.

Word map with translation phrases

Services

CenTraS offers high quality translation and accessibility services across different media and languages through Translation and Media Accessibility Services (TraMAS).

"Small-group language-specific sessions are particularly useful. Besides, many professional seminars are hosted at UCL throughout the academic year. This semi-professional approach is the cornerstone of CenTraS’s enviable reputation in translator training. Last but not least, a major advantage is 24/7 free access to a fully-equipped in-campus dry-lab, including CAT tools and highly specialised software." (Alejandro Bolaños García-Escribano, Specialised Translation MSc (Audiovisual) 2015/16)

Latest News & Events

“The translation world and beyond…

We witnessed the birth of the modern computer between 1943 and 1946; it was not long after that Warren Weaver wrote his famous memorandum in 1949 suggesting that translation by machine would be possible. Weaver’s dream did not quite come true: while automatic translation went on to work reasonably in some scenarios and to do well for gisting purposes, even today, against the background of the latest promising results delivered by statistical Machine Translation (MT) systems such as Google Translate and latest developments in Neural Machine Translation and in general Deep Learning for MT, automatic translation often gets it wrong and is not good enough for professional translation. Consequently, there has been a pressing need for a new generation of tools for professional translators to assist them reliably and speed up the translation process. First Krollman put forward the reuse of existing human translations in 1971. A few years later, in 1979 Arthern went further and proposed the retrieval and reuse not only of identical text fragments (exact matches) but also of similar source sentences and their translations (fuzzy matches). It took another decade before the ideas sketched by Krollman and Arthern were commercialised as a result of the development of various computer-aided translation (CAT) tools such as Translation Memory (TM) systems in the early 1990s.  These translation tools revolutionised the work of translators and the last two decades saw dramatic changes in the translation workflow.

Published: Apr 20, 2018 11:41:58 AM

Recent research on creative subtitling: Translation and technology

Visual behaviour research in the last few years has shown relevant differences in the reception of audiovisual productions depending on whether interlinguistic subtitling was embedded in order to decode their verbal content for foreign audiences. Testing surveys have led to the conclusion that its conventional layout at the bottom of the screen modifies the viewing experience compared to the projection of the same production when subtitles are absent.

Published: Feb 27, 2018 11:28:08 AM