News and Events

DCNU in the News December 2013

Sunday 8 December 2013 More...




Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Journal July


Latest Quarterly Journal of:
Developmental
Cognitive Neuroscience

(Volume 7: January 2014)

2012 Impact Factor: 3.160

GOSH Children's Charity Project

Recovery of Brain Function in Children who had Neurosurgical Treatment for Epilepsy



Funding Body:

Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity

goshcharitylogo


Type of Study: Longitudinal cohort study

Principal Investigator:

Dr Torsten Baldeweg (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health)

Collaborators (listed alphabetically):

Dr Chris Clark (Imaging and Biophysics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health)

Dr Jonathan Clayden (Neuroimaging & Biophysics, UCL Institute of Child Health)

Professor J Helen Cross (Neurosciences Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health & Honorary Consultant Paediatric Neurology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children)

Mr William Harkness (Paediatric Neurosurgeon, Neurosurgery Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children)

Dr Sue Harrison (Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Great Ormond Street Hospital)

Dr Frédérique Liégeois (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health)

Dr Peter Rankin (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health)

Dr Patricia Martin Sanfilippo (Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Great Ormond Street Hospital)

Professor Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, FMedSci (Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Child Health and Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Great Ormond Street Hospital)

Summary of Project:

GOSH is a leading centre for epilepsy treatment, carrying out over 70% of paediatric epilepsy surgery in the UK since 1992. An important part of the pre-surgical diagnostic investigations is the mapping of essential functions to brain regions, so that the neurosurgeon does not remove regions that are supporting cognitive and motor development. This is increasingly performed using non-invasive structural and functional neuroimaging methods. We wish to conduct a comprehensive follow-up investigation of children who had neurosurgical treatment, with the aim to identify factors that facilitate a positive cognitive outcome and recovery. Specifically, we wish to examine the effect of surgical resection in proximity to language cortex on cognitive outcome. This is an important issue which has not been well documented in children. We would like to study 60 children with pre-operative neuropsychological and neuroimaging data, half of whom have now undergone surgery. Children who did not undergo surgery would also be invited to participate - providing a non-surgical comparison group. We will also use modern functional and structural neuroimaging (performed pre- and post-operatively) to establish if brain growth combined with improved seizure status after surgery result in a favourable long-term outcome. The project will provide important evidence for improving cognitive, educational and psychosocial outcomes of children who undergo epilepsy surgery.