Large variation in ice surface vacancies

A view of the ice surface illustrating weakly, (red), intermediate (white) and strongly bound water molecules (blue). White molecules are at the external surface, grey lie sub-surface.

A view of the ice surface illustrating weakly, (red), intermediate (white) and strongly bound water molecules (blue). White molecules are at the external surface, grey lie sub-surface.

Ice exhibits a phenomenon known as pre-melting which was first alluded to by Michael Faraday in his ‘regelation’ experiments at the Royal Institution in the 1850’s. A liquid like layer forms at the surface of ice, but there is dispute about the temperature at which this layer first occurs.

Understanding the structure of the layer and its temperature dependence is important in the context of atmospheric heterogeneous catalysis, because the surface of ice particulates facilitate reactions of radicals and trace gases in the atmosphere.

In a recent paper in Nature Materials, TYC researchers at UCL (Matt Watkins, Angelos Michaelides and Ben Slater) in collaboration with researchers from University of Zurich, Peking University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have discovered unexpected properties of ice at the nanoscale that relate to Faraday’s experiments. Using density functional theory calculations, they discovered each molecule is bound to the surface by a difference force, unlike most crystalline materials where each surface molecule has an identical binding energy. A fraction of the surface molecules are so weakly bound that they are easily displaced to form an overlayer, leading to less crystalline surface layers. The figure illustrates the variation in binding energy, which arises from the interaction of the water’s dipole within a geometrically frustrated array of neighbouring dipole moments.

This work has been published in Nature Materials

Journal link:Nature Materials.

News

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Angelos has been awarded the RSC Surfaces and Interfaces Award!

Angelos has been awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry Surfaces and Interfaces Award, for “outstanding contributions towards the understanding of complex aqueous interfaces and the formation of ice at such interfaces.” More information can be found here: https://www.rsc.org/awards-funding/awards/2020-winners/ Congratulations Angelos!

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New Humboldt-Fellow in the group

Julia was successful in her application for an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship and will continue her work in the ICE group with the Feodor Lynen Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation as of 1st June 2020. Congratulations Julia!  

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The ICE group is moving!

Angelos has accepted a position in Cambridge, and so the ICE group is moving! It’s going to be a reasonably slow multi-year phase transition. You can find more information in the official announcement. Congratulations, Angelos, and all the best for this exciting new opportunity!

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Angelos appears on Clarivate’s ‘Highly Cited Researchers’ list!

Angelos has appeared on Clarivate’s ‘Highly Cited Researchers’ list for the second year in a row. Inclusion on the list is based on the number of recent publications that ranked in the top 1% by citations in a given field and year. For further details see: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2019/nov/ucl-academics-named-global-list-influential-researchers Congratulations!

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Martin wins PhD prize!

Martin won the Marshall Stoneham prize for his PhD thesis on “Merging data-driven and computational methods to understand ice nucleation”. It is awarded by the Condensed Matter & Materials Physics Group (CMMP) for outstanding postgraduate research. Well done!

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Fabian wins Best Poster prize at the MMM Hub conference!

The second annual Materials & Molecular Modelling (MMM) Hub Conference and User Meeting took place on 3-4 September. Many excellent talks demonstrated how the computational resources provided by the MMM Hub are used to tackle challenges in many areas of biological, chemical, and physical research. This was also illustrated by more than 50 posters, spanning […]

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Science and sports in York

Last weekend, the ICE group gathered in York for the International Materials Simulation Workshop. Current and former members as well as collaborators talked about their recent projects and discussed how to tackle society’s big challenges, utilize advancements in methodology and make the most of fruitful collaborations. The meeting highlighted the diverse range of problems that […]

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Triple Triathlon at Castle Howard in support of WaterAid

The ICE group will be participating in the Castle Triathlon series for the third year in a row. This time, three relays teams are going to compete at Castle Howard, near York, on 21 July. They will be swimming, cycling and running a combined distance of roughly 280 km! As part of the tradition, the […]

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Open postdoc position (University of Manchester & ICE group)

A 2-year postdoc position is available in the Condensed Matter Physics group at the University of Manchester. The project will be carried out in collaboration with the ICE group and involves developing and applying theoretical models to understand the anomalous dielectric behaviour of water under confinement (Fumagalli et al. Science 360, 1339-1342, 2018). You can […]

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Angelos sets world record at the London Marathon!

Angelos set a new world record for the “fastest marathon dressed as a scientist (male)” at this year’s London Marathon, finishing in 3:22:51. Congratulations! He also managed to raise more than £3000 in support of WaterAid, an international charity working to provide clean water and decent toilets to people all over the world. Many thanks […]

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