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Charlotte Guo, MSci Psychology & Language Sciences

"It’s one of the pioneering, interdisciplinary degrees in the UK, bridging Psychology and Language Sciences. I benefited from the topics offered, as well as the open-mindedness of Faculty members."

Charlotte Guo

29 July 2020

1. Why did you choose your degree?

It’s one of the pioneering, interdisciplinary degrees in the UK, bridging Psychology and Language Sciences. I benefitted much from the range of topics being offered, as well as the open-mindedness of faculty members.


2. Why did you apply to study at UCL?

Being located at the heart of London, opportunities are open from both within and out of the university. For example I’ve volunteered with a few independent charities in London. I also enjoy UCL’s diversity and cultural nourishment.


3. What do you enjoy most about your degree?

Placement and practical aspects.


4. What do you find most interesting about your field of study and what inspires you?

The study of the human mind/brain is virtually linked with every other discipline, humanities and sciences alike. I particularly enjoy drawing links between my scientific studies and my background knowledge in philosophy. The bright future of the field inspires me.


5. What are your career plans once you’ve completed your current programme of study at UCL?

Either work as a research assistant in a lab-based environment; or take some time out to work in the industry before I apply for a PhD.


6. Do you think studying at UCL Faculty of Brain Sciences is a good investment?

Yes!


7. Have you undertaken any networking opportunities either as part of your degree or outside of your studies?

There are many career events offered by PALS or sister departments. I’ve attended quite a few and enjoyed my conversation with researchers and alumni.


8. What is it like studying in London and how do you think it has benefited your studies?

It’s definitely facilitated my independence. Studying in London, many of the people you encounter along the way will not be from an exclusively academic environment. Having this broader sense of enculturation is essential to becoming a good psychologist, and it’s certainly led me to reflect upon the mode of education I receive and helped me in deciding my next steps.