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Postgraduate modules

Browse the sections below to find out more about the wide range of postgraduate modules available at the Bartlett School of Planning.

Due to large student numbers within the School of Planning, all our postgraduate modules are closed to students from other departments in 2015–16. Some are open to students from the MSc Urban Studies – please check with the MSc Urban Studies Course Director.

Students should always refer to the UCL online timetable for accurate information on module scheduling.

BENVGEP3 Real Estate Appraisal 

The purpose of this module is to enable students to gain an understanding of the bases, methods and applications of real estate appraisal in real estate markets. Students will learn about the concepts, tools and techniques for appraising individual real estate assets. 

Upon completion of the course, students should have a broad understanding of the nature of real estate as an asset, the financial mathematics required to perform real estate appraisal, the main approaches to real estate appraisal, the objectives and uses of real estate appraisals and techniques for estimating the value of real estate assets. The module will be taught by a combination of workshop exercises and lectures.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is taught over 10 sessions, comprising a mix of lectures and workshops.

Aims

The course aims to provide an introduction to real estate valuation and/or appraisal, the range of possible methodologies, their strengths and limitations and the appropriate contexts for their application.

Following an introduction to the nature of the asset being appraised, it focuses on definitions of value, methods of appraisal, purposes of valuation and appraisals, introduction to financial mathematics and investment appraisal, the appraisal of standing and development assets, the appraisal of real estate assets using capitalization rates, international variations in appraisal approaches, appraisal uncertainty and environmental issues in appraisal.  

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student should:

  • understand the investment qualities of real estate assets, 
  • appreciate the role and bases of valuations and appraisals
  • apply DCF techniques to appraise real estate assets and development opportunities;
  • be able to critically appreciate the natures, causes and consequences of appraisal uncertainty
  • understand the extent of international integration and segmentation in appraisal methods  
  • appreciate the growing importance of environmental issues in valuing and appraising real estate assets

Structure/Outline

The main areas covered in the 10 lecture sessions will be:

  • Introduction to real estate. Methods, definitions and purposes of appraisals.
  • Financial mathematics for real estate appraisal.
  • Calculating the Investment Value of Real Estate Assets: Techniques and Information Needs
  • Calculating the Market Value of Real Estate Development Opportunities
  • Calculating the Market Value of Real Estate Assets
  • Appraisal Uncertainty
  • International Issues in Appraisal
  • Environmental Issues and Appraisal

Staff

Dr Tommaso Gabrieli
View Tommaso's profile
Email: t.gabrieli@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Coursework: 100%

The assessment will consist of a project that is a simulated professional exercise involving the appraisal of a commercial real estate asset.

Indicative reading

  • Baum, A. and Crosby, N. (2008) Property Investment Appraisal (3e).  Blackwell: Oxford.
  • Baum, A. Mackmin, D. and Nunnington, N. (2002) The Income Approach to Valuation, International Thomson Business Press, London.
  • Wyatt, P. (2007) Property Valuation in an Economic Context, Blackwell Publishing: Oxford.
BENVGEP4 Real Estate Investment

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught through a series of ten weekly lectures, delivered by the module leader and a variety of guest speakers, typically property professionals currently working in practice.

There will be online sessions for discussing module content and related reading throughout term one.  Self-directed learning and reading is complementary to the formal lectures and should be used to explore key elements of the module. 

A revision session will be arranged for term two, prior to the examination period.

Aims

The aim of the module is to introduce and develop knowledge of the key concepts and fundamental principles of commercial real estate investment.

The module will begin by considering the unique characteristics of property as an asset class and where it fits within the wider investment market, who invests in property and why?  The risk and return potential of direct and indirect property will be considered in relation to other investment media, such as stocks and bonds.  Diverse ways in which property can be invested will be considered, as well as how such vehicles are managed by investors as an integral aspect of international and multi-asset portfolios.

Market performance, cycles and trends will be considered and relevant models and theories examined.  Market forecasting, modelling, indices and the efficiency of the market will be introduced, combining to offer a solid introduction to property as an international investment medium.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the module, students should have a broad understanding of the position of real estate in the global investment market.  They will have developed knowledge and competency in:

  • The characteristics of investment markets and investors generally;
  • The factors affecting the performance of investment markets; 
  • The nature of risk, return and uncertainty in the market;
  • Characteristics of different investment assets (direct and indirect property, listed and unlisted, stocks, bonds);
  • Challenges and benefits associated with property as an investment;
  • The relevance and importance of diversification strategies;
  • The role of property in the multi-asset portfolio;
  • The strengths and weaknesses of real estate performance measurement and analysis;
  • Assessing property cycles and forecasting methods;
  • The growth and development of international, cross-border property transactions; 
  • Evaluating the place of property in the investment spectrum.

Structure / Outline

The initial weeks of the module (weeks one - three) will introduce and embed key concepts and theories relating to investment, investment vehicles and property investment.  

Weeks four and five will look specifically at evaluating different types of property investment – listed and unlisted.

Week six is reading week and there is no lecture.

Weeks eight – ten will examine forecasting and trends, cycles, indices and international investment, considering the role of property in multi-asset, global portfolios.

Staff

Dr Nicola Livingstone
View Nicola's profile
Email: n.livingstone@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

The module is assessed through examination only.  The 100% exam is essay based, with students answering 2 essay questions from 5 in the paper.

Indicative reading

  • Baum, A. & Hartzell, D. (2012) ‘Global Property Investment:  Strategies, Structures, Decisions’.  Wiley Blackwell.
  • Brown, G.R. & Matysiak, G.A. (2000) ‘Real Estate Investment:  A Capital Market Approach’, FT Prentice Hall, Pearson Education. 
  • Geltner, D. & Miller, N. (2000) ‘Commercial Real Estate Analysis and Investment’, South-Western University Press. 
  • Hoesli, M. & MacGregor, B. (1999) ‘Property Investment:  Principles and Practice of Portfolio Management’, Longman. 
  • Isaac, D. & O’Leary, J. (2011) ‘Property Investment’, 2nd Edition, Palgrave Macmillan.

Additional reading (journal papers, websites, and articles) will be provided through Moodle. 

BENVGEPA Planning Practices In Europe

Spatial development in Europe is the outcome of the policies and practices of the EU, of its member states and of regional and local entities, all interacting at various scales with private business and social institutions.

This module invites and requires students to research, analyse and present the practices adopted in a number of European countries in spatial planning and development at wide spatial scales – focusing on regions and metropolitan or other large areas  – and examine related EU-wide policy issues. Issues of self-containment, commuter and migration flows, housing and economics are prominent in the comparative studies. Issues of regional development and inclusion/exclusion are often to the fore in Europe-wide analysis. 

Teaching and Learning Methods

The student work is supported by 10 x 3-hour sessions, each comprising of a mixture of lectures, small group seminars and/or exercises, general discussion and occasional student presentations (welcome but not mandatory).

The student group typically includes members from at least a dozen countries, which is a valuable resource.

Aims

Practices in regional and urban planning vary greatly across Europe, reflecting differences in political and social histories, economic conditions, traditions of law and governance, land tenure, resource endowments and interactions between places.

The module aims to develop understanding of these variations and their significance, drawing upon a growing literature in English and, where possible, in the other languages of which students have a command. It analyses the complex and changing relationships between planning systems, institutions of land ownership, law, taxation and market conditions, seeking to develop frameworks for understanding the evolving dynamics of cities and the genesis and the outcomes of urban developments.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Describe the essential components of a planning system
  • Define how planning systems and practices affect the spatial, economic and social organisation of cities
  • Recognise the key families of planning systems in Europe and their differences and similarities
  • Outline key European policies with an influence on spatial planning and their impacts on planning practices
  • Illustrate the complexity surrounding planning with a critical assessment of international examples and case studies.

Structure/Outline

The course is organised in lectures, small group seminars and student presentations.

The series of lectures presents an overview of spatial development issues in Europe and examines, by example, the range of practices found across the nation states, regions and cities of Europe.

It begins by examining the scope and purpose of planning and its varying dimensions and cultures. It looks at who and what can steer urban development and evolution of national and European planning policies and practices. The module also explores topics such as planning and spatial development in transition countries, planning in cross border areas, transnational competition and cooperation, value capture and its relation with planning policies and development strategies.

A separate module, BENVGEPC, follows and complements this one, with a strong focus on smaller-scale development projects and local scale planning.

The small group seminars and exercises are designed as opportunities to engage more directly and interactively with the subjects of the lectures and to develop transferable skills (group work; review, summary and presentation of printed materials; communication). 

Seminars and exercises can take place before or after the lecture session depending on their content and purpose.

Students are encouraged to present their work at any stage of development. Presentations are not part of the assessment and are a good opportunity to receive feedback from the teaching panel and peer students alike.

Week 1

General introduction: scope and dimensions of planning, planning cultures. Structure of the module, assignments and assessments 

Group discussions: Well and poorly planned cities

Week 2

Schools of thought in the social sciences and their role in the theoretical and analytical frameworks for and in spatial planning

Group exercise: Understanding theoretical and analytical frameworks in planning

Week 3

Approaches to the categorisation of planning systems and regimes

Group exercise: Peer assessment: what makes a good essay?

Week 4

Planning London

Week 5

European Union Policies with implications for Spatial Planning

Students presentations (voluntary but welcome)

Week 6

Reading week

Week 7

Cross-border and transnational planning. From territorial competition to cooperation?

Group Exercise: Design a successful cross-border EU cooperation project

Week 8

The definition and regulation of property and property rights in European planning systems

Week 9

tba

Week 10

Planning problems in post-socialist cities and regions

Week 11    

Critical guided walk of Kings Cross

Staff

Michael Edwards
View Michael's profile 
Email: m.edwards@ucl.ac.uk

with contributions from:

Dr Claire Colomb
View Claire's profile
Email: c.colomb@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Coursework: 100% Written examination: 0%.

Half of the marks are to be obtained from each of:

  • Short essay comparing the planning practices of two cities or regions (max 1500 words excluding plans, images, references but including tables).
  • Short essay on a topic from a list to be circulated (max 1500 words).

Criteria for assessment(s)

General assessment criteria include: 

  • Content (approach to research, formulation of the essay and of problems and issues to compare, analytical / theoretical framework, relevance of material examined, omissions, drawing of useful conclusions);
  • Form (clear structure of the essay, English language, good use of tables, maps, images, citation of sources, bibliography, length).

Besides the list of readings provided, there is a rich literature on planning practices in Europe and European cities and regions. Marks will be awarded for evidence of critical engagement with key debates and further readings, understanding of the principles of planning and their practical applications in international contexts and the formulation of a logical argument with reference to literature and case studies.

Up to 20% of marks can be deducted for incorrect presentation of bibliography, poor grammar or style, poor spelling or punctuation, value-laden language.

Assessment Timetable

Submission of the first (comparative) essay is due on Friday before reading week by 5pm via Moodle. Submission of the second (thematic) essay is due on the first Friday of the second term by 5pm via Moodle. Check UCL term calendar for the exact dates.

Feedback

Formative feedback

Guidance and support is available to students before the coursework is due and you are strongly encouraged to discuss the preparation of the coursework well before submission with Michael Edwards or Jo Ram at the end of the scheduled classes, via email, or by making an appointment.

We will normally be able to comment on structure, answer questions about a topic, suggest further reading or suggest the names of authors who've written on a topic.  However we cannot do your literature searching for you and we will not review draft essays.

Additionally a peer-assessment exercise is scheduled on week 3. Students will be given the opportunity to provide feedback and to mark past years’ essays using the general assessment criteria that apply in this module and to compare their assessment with the tutors’. It is highly recommended that you attend this session.

Summative feedback

Feedback on the first essay is usually returned within 2 weeks of submission

Feedback on the second essay is expected within 4 weeks of submission

Indicative Reading

Key readings

These are essential readings that provide the basic information, tools and approaches required by this module.

Further readings for the comparative and thematic essays will be provided in week 2.

For the comparative essay or any independently chosen topic for the second essay, you are also expected, to a large extent, to research your two selected cities or metropolitan regions, independently.

  • Altrock, U, S Güntner, S Huning and D Peters (2006) Spatial Planning and Urban development in the new EU member States: From Adjustment to Reinvention, Ashgate
  • Brenner, N. 2004. Urban governance and the production of new state spaces in Western Europe, 1960–2000. Review of International Political Economy,  11,  447-488.
  • Brenner, N. 2004. New state spaces: urban governance and the rescaling of statehood , Oxford University Press, USA.
  • Dühr, S, C Colomb and V Nadin (2010) European spatial planning and territorial cooperation , London: Routledge
  • Gielen, D. M. & Tasan-Kok, T. 2010. Flexibility in Planning and the Consequences for Public-value Capturing in UK, Spain and the Netherlands. European Planning Studies, 18, 1097-1131
  • Healey, P (2010) In Search of the “Strategic” in Spatial Strategy Making, Planning Theory and Practice 10(4): 439-457
  • Janin Rivolin, U. 2008. Conforming and Performing Planning Systems in Europe: An Unbearable Cohabitation. Planning Practice & Research, 23, 167-186.
  • Moulaert, F, A Rodriguez, et al. (2003) The Globalized City: economic restructuring and social polarization in European Cities. Oxford, Oxford University Press
  • Nadin, V. & Stead, D. 2008. European Spatial Planning Systems, Social Models and Learning. disP, 172, 35-47.
  • Newman, P and A Thornley (2011) Planning World Cities: globalization and urban politics, London: Palgrave
  • Swyngedouw, E, Moulaert, F & Rodriguez, A 2002. Neoliberal Urbanization in Europe: Large Scale Urban Development Projects and the New Urban Policy. Antipode, 34, 542-577.
  • Whitehead, C and K Scanlon, (eds) (2007) Social housing in Europe, London: LSE London.

Suggested readings on comparative analysis in urban planning and urban studies

  • Kemeny, Jim. "Comparative housing and welfare: theorising the relationship." Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 16.1 (2001): 53-70.
  • Oxley, Michael. "Meaning, science, context and confusion in comparative housing research." Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 16.1 (2001): 89-106.
  • Pickvance, C. G. 1995. Comparative Analysis, Causality and Case Studies in Urban Studies. In: Rogers, A. & Vertovec, S. (eds.) The Urban Context. Ethnicity Social Networks and Situational Analysis. Berg Publishers.
  • Pickvance, C. G. 2001. Four varieties of comparative analysis. Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, 16, 7–28-7–28 (highly recommended)
BENVGEPB Critical Debates in Real Estate & Planning

This module provides students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, reflection and critical discussion around key concepts and themes in international real estate and planning, in small-group seminars

Teaching and Learning Methods

The course is taught in small-group seminars, in which concepts and ideas presented in papers and articles are discussed. It requires reading of papers and texts prior to seminar meetings

Aims & Outcomes

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, reflection and critical discussion around key concepts and themes in international real estate and planning. Through active small-group seminar discussions centred on key readings, students will develop a deeper knowledge of practices and theories associated with the subject matter.

Structure / Outline

The module comprises 5 seminar sessions, for which a list of key readings will be provided. To allow for small group discussion, MSc/PG Dip International Real Estate and Planning students will be divided in two groups, who will attend the seminars in alternate weeks. The topics of seminars are will be confirmed before the start of the course, but are likely to be as follows:

Week 1    Seminar 1: Markets and Planning (Group 1)
Week 2    Seminar 1: Markets and Planning (Group 2)
Week 3    Seminar 2: Property Market Structures (Group 1)
Week 4    Seminar 2: Property Market Structures (Group 2)
Week 5    Seminar 3: Property Markets Cycles (Group 1)
Week 6    Reading week
Week 7    Seminar 3: Property Markets Cycles (Group 2)
Week 8    Seminar 4: Property and Urban Regeneration (Group 1)
Week 9    Seminar 4: Property and Urban Regeneration (Group 2)
Week 10    Seminar 5: Market Evolution and Globalisation (Group 1)
Week 11    Seminar 5: Market Evolution and Globalisation (Group 2)

Staff

Dr Kwame Addae-Dapaah
View Kwame's profile
Email: k.addae-dapaah@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Coursework: 100% (20% participation in seminars, 80% essay)

The coursework will take the form of independent reading leading to seminar discussions and critical reflection. Students will be asked to present a critical synopsis of the literature and to discuss it. At the end of the course each student should write a 3,000-word essay.

This essay carries 80% of the course marks. A small proportion of the marks (20%) will be awarded for the quality of each student's participation in the seminars. This will take the form of short summaries of all readings for each session (150 words per item) + suggestion of 2 issues for discussion which will be handed in at the beginning of the session.

Indicative Reading

  • Adair A, J Berry and S McGreal, 2003, 'Urban regeneration and property investment performance', Journal of Property Research, Vol.20 (4), pp 371-386
  • Adair A, J Berry, S Mcgreal, L Sýkora, A Parsa and B Redding, 1999, 'Globalisation of rea; estate markets in Central Europe', European Planning Studies, Vol. 7 (3), pp 295-305
  • Adams D, C Watkins and M White (eds.), 2005, Planning, Public Policy and Property Markets, Oxford: Blackwell. Chapters 2 and 3, pp 17-55
  • Ball M, 1994, 'The 1980s property boom', Environment and Planning A, Vol 26, pp 671-695
  • Barras R, 1994, 'Property and the economic cycle: building cycles revisited', Journal of Property Research, Vol.11, pp 183-197
  • Chesire P and C Hilber, 2007, 'Office space supply restrictions in Britain: The political economy of market revenge', paper presented to European Real Estate Society Conference, Cass Business School, City University, London 28th June.
  • D’Arcy E and G Keogh, 2002, 'The market context of property development activity, in S Guy and J Henneberry (eds.) Development and Developers: Perspectives on property, Oxford: Blackwell, pp 19-34
  • De Magalhães C, 2001, 'International property consultants and the transformation of local markets', Journal of Property Research, Vol. 18 (1), 99-121
  • Guy S, J Henneberry and S Rowley, 2002, 'Development cultures and urban regeneration', Urban Studies, Vol. 39 (7), pp 1181-1196
  • Henneberry J and S Rowley, 2002, 'Developers decisions and property market behaviour', in S guy and J Henneberry (eds.), Development and Developers: Perspectives on Property, Oxford: Blackwell, pp 96-114
  • Henneberry J, 1995, 'Developers, property cycles and local economic development: The case of Sheffield', Local Economy, Vol. 10 (2), pp163-185.
  • Hoesli M and B MacGregor, 2000, 'International property investment', in Property Investment: Principles and Practice of Portfolio Manangement, Harlow: Longman, pp 248-271.
  • Keogh G and E D'Arcy, 1994, 'Market maturity and property market behaviour: A European comparison of mature and emergent markets', Journal of Property Research, Vol. 11, pp 215-235.
  • Nappi-Choulet I, 2006, 'The role and behaviour of commercial property investors and developers in French urban regeneration: The experience of the Paris Region', Urban Studies, Vol. 43 (9), pp1511-1535.
  • Needham B, 2006, Planning, Law and Economics: The rules we make for using land, Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 1, pp 1-17
  • Pryke M, 1994, 'Looking back on the space of a boom: (Re)developing special matrices in the City of London', Environment and Planning A, Vol. 26, pp 235-264.
  • Seabrooke W and How H, 2004, 'Real estate transactions: an institutional perspective', in W Seabrooke, P Kent and HHow (eds) International Real Estate: An Institutional Approach, Oxford: Blackwell, pp 3-34
  • Swyngedow E, F Moulaert and A Rodriguez, 2002, 'Neoliberal urbanisation in Europe: Large-scale urban development projects and the New Urban Policy', Antipode, Vol. 34 (3), pp 542-577
  • Turok I, 1992, 'Property-led urban regeneration: Panacea or placebo?' Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24 (3), pp 361-379
  • Webster c and L Lai, 2003, Property Rights, Planning and Markets: Managing spontaneous cities, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. Chapter 1, pp 1-28
BENVGEPC Comparative Urban Projects

This module introduces the theory and practices of mega urban projects against the background of changing urban governance and land development processes in the world. 

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is taught over 10 sessions, comprising a mix of lectures, student presentation and a field visit.

Aims & Outcomes

The module focuses on large urban projects, developments and episodes in the major metropolitan regions in the world, including emerging economies as well as the cities in Western Europe and North America.

It challenges students to analyse the relationship between planning systems, institution of ownership, and market conditions, and seeks to develop frameworks for understanding the genesis and outcomes of urban developments.

The module also explores the implications of ‘planning by projects’ in a comparative perspective, and questions the implications of the recent economic crisis and the sustainability of mega-projects.

A major part of this module is a self-directed comparative research project which explores the institutional arrangements that enable or constrain major urban development projects in two different cities or countries.

Emphasis is placed on the comparative analysis of process and outcome and the critical assessment of the selected projects. This is supported by 10x2 hour weekly lectures/field visits/student presentations focused on helping students develop a framework for critical analysis.

Students should obtain:

  • A strong grasp of the main variations in the characteristic forms and functions of development, including the relationship of private and public agents;
  • Skills in criticising and evaluating planning consultant reports and developing planning briefs;
  • Further experience in presenting in a seminar context and in written and graphic form.

Structure/Outline

Week 20Mega urban projects and planning
Week 21

Governance and Mega urban projects +

Project tutorial: Group 1-6 & Group 7-12

Week 22

Group 1-6:  
Assessing ‘success’: Canary Wharf + Walk and Visit * 

Group 7-12:  
Property-led and culture-led redevelopment + Project tutorial

Week 23

Group 1-6:  
Property-led and culture-led redevelopment + Project tutorial

Group 7-12:  
Assessing ‘success’: Canary Wharf + Walk and Visit * 

Week 24London Dockland and Canary Wharf case 
 Reading week
Week 26Canary Wharf new development, operation and management
Week 27

Place promotion and branding & Land development process +

Project tutorial: Group 1-6 & Group 7-12

Week 28Group presentation
Week 29Group presentation
Week 30Good Friday: no class

Note: * details will be given in the course 

Staff

Professor Fulong Wu
View Fulong's profile 
Email: fulong.wu@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Coursework: 100%

The coursework comprises of:

- a group project report (50%), 
- a live final presentation of the project to class (20%), and 
- an individual essay (30%). 

Group project:

i) Description of assessment:

Because of the class size, this module will have 12 student project groups. Depending upon the final size, each group will expect to consist of seven students. The group project includes a presentation and a final report. 

ii) Criteria for assessment:

The assessment criteria include the understanding of contextual issues, appropriate justification for choosing the case, the quality of discussion, and a nuanced understanding of the case, the relevance of recommendations, appropriate comparison of the cases (for the option of comparing two clients), clarity and coherence of the report, quality and appropriate use of visual materials, and appropriate use of references.

iii) Deadlines and mode of submission:

For more information, please see module outline in Moodle.

Individual essay

i) Description of assessment:

The individual essay uses the academic literature to reflect on the case(s) of your group project. The essay may ask why the development was initially proposed and how they were conceived and implemented. The essay needs to be reflective and critical – that is, the essay should not just provide some descriptive materials of these projects. It needs to pay attention to the contextual issues of these projects.

The essay may examine key players in the process of development, planning of mega urban projects, and their impacts on the city. The essay may need to assess to what extent these projects are successful and what issues are raised related to their development. In addition, it is helpful to compare differences and similarities between these cases. Finally, the essay may reflect on what these projects tell us about the general trend and process of urban development and thus contributes to the literature.

ii) Criteria for assessment:

The essay should follow the style of academic research paper, with a proper title to capture the main point. It should include the references to relevant theories or perspectives. The coursework needs to think carefully about using visual materials and only do so when it is appropriate. The sources of information must always be included. If you use web materials, be sure that the specific URL is indicated. The page number of quotations should be provided. The reference list should contain only the references that cited in the essay text. All references in the list should be mentioned in the body text. The usual assessment criteria for an academic essay will be used for marking.   

iii) Deadlines and mode of submission:

For more information, please see module outline in Moodle.

iv) Feedback:

Guidance and support available to students before the coursework is due. 

Formative feedback: coursework briefing will be given in the lectures; feedbacks to group projects will be given after group presentation so that the students can revise their project reports.

Summative feedback: the marking sheet with detailed feedback will be returned to you within 20 working days (i.e. 4 weeks).

Indicative Reading

Detailed reading list for each session will be issued in the Moodle. 
The indicative reading list is as follows:

  • Carmona, M. 2009. “The Isle of Dogs: four development waves, five planning models, twelve plans, thirty-five years, and a renaissance ... of sorts’, Progress in Planning 71(3): 87-151.
  • Fainstein, S. 2008. ‘Mega-projects in New York, London, Amsterdam’, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 32(4): 768-785.
  • Haila, A. 1999. "City building in the East and West." Cities 16:259-267.
  • Haila, A. 2000. "Real estate in global cities: Singapore and Hong Kong as property states." Urban Studies 37:2241-2256.
  • Jessop, B. and N.L. Sum. 2000. "An entrepreneurial city in action: Hong Kong's emerging strategies in and for (inter)urban competition." Urban Studies 37:2287-2313.
  • Lehrer, U. and Laidley, J. 2008. “Old mega-projects newly packaged? Waterfront redevelopment in Toronto”, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 32(4), 786-803.
  • Orueta, F.D. and S. Fainstein (2008) ‘The new mega-projects: genesis and impacts’, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 32(4): 759-767.
  • Salet, W. (2008) ‘Rethinking urban projects: experiences in Europe’, Urban Studies 45(11): 2343-2363.
  • Wu, F. (2015) Planning for Growth: Urban and Regional Planning in China. London: Routledge. (Chapter 6 New Practices: New Town and Eco-City Planning) (HT169.C6 W8 2015)
BENVGEPD Sustainable Property: Valuation, Investment, Development

The module looks at the property, investment and development sectors in the context of the importance of sustainable property development as a goal. It seeks to provide planners with the necessary understanding of development processes, investment rationales and valuation methods for promoting more sustainable urban change.

At the end of the course the student should:

1. Understand the significance of the sustainable development agenda for the property sector and the interface with Corporate Social Responsibility

2. Understand the key elements of property valuation and investment and development appraisal methodologies and be able to critique applications

3. Understand the elements of the property development process and how these are shaped by regulation and certification as well as economic considerations

4. Understand the nature of property investment and how this influences property market dynamic

Structure/Outline

Week 1 (YR)

Introduction to the module

Property markets and their analysis; the nature of property; property sub-markets concerning occupation, investment and development; outline of sub-sectors of the property including industry, residential and commercial. 

Introducing sustainable development; corporate incentives for addressing sustainability including CSR in the property development and investment industries

Week 2 & 3 (KAD)Prices, rents and sustainability: economic dynamics of price setting; comparative method of valuing prices and rents; differences between residential, retail, commercial, industrial etc. sub-sectors; research on the influence of sustainability features on prices and rents
Week 4 & 5 (KAD)Property investment and sustainability; the nature of property investment; the investment method of property valuation; the debate on sustainability and the choice of yield
 Reading Week
Week 6 (KAD)Property development processes: stages of property development; key actors and inter-relationships; introduction to development appraisal
Week 7 (YR) The interface of development processes with regulation through planning and building control; standardising sustainable development: BREEAM, LEED and other classification systems; speaker from BRE
Week 8 (YR) Embodied carbon: accounting for carbon; the impact on property development decisions; speaker from Sturgis Carbon Profiling
Week 9 (YR)Social sustainability and property; broadening the sustainability agenda for property
Week 10 (YR) 

Case study presentations and panel discussion: three representatives from the property sector will present case studies of best practice and discuss questions from the audience

Staff

Professor Yvonne Rydin
View Yvonne's profile
Email: Y.Rydin@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Description of assessment

Written examination: 100%

Three questions to be answered from six questions set in two hours

Criteria for assessment

Students will be marked on their ability to use the material from the module to answer the question set.

Indicative Reading

  • R. Emmanuel and K. Baker (2012) Carbon Management and the Built Environment Routledge, London
  • Rydin, Y. (2010) Governing for Sustainable Urban Development Earthscan, London
  • Keeping, M. and Shiers, D. (2004) Sustainable Property Development, Blackwell, Oxford
  • Millington, A.F. (2000) An Introduction to Property Valuation, Estate Gazette Books, London

or

  • Scarrett, D. (1991) Property Valuation: the five methods, Taylor & Francis, London
BENVGEPE Real Estate Development

This module examines the entire development process for the different types of property development and redevelopment. 

Discussions will cover the development process, development cycles, feasibility and development financing. 

By completing the module, students will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to evaluate the feasibility of, and undertake property development projects.

Staff

Peter McLennan
Email: p.mclennan@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% Coursework.

Indicative Reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle.

BENVGHD1 Management of Housing Projects

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught through a series of 10 two-hour sessions, which will include a mixture of lectures given by the module coordinator, presentations from practitioners in housing delivery, informal class-based tasks and seminar discussions.  

Aims & Objectives

The aim of the module is to introduce students not only to the usual tools and techniques of project management but also to a more holistic approach to the subject. This stresses the importance of the front end of the project as well as the critical nature of managing relationships between people and organizations in good project management.

This approach also emphasizes the relationship between the project and the strategic objectives of the client organization. The module will illustrate these issues with examples from housing development projects and consider how the wider issues of quality and sustainability can be properly integrated into project decision-making processes.

The objectives of the module are:

  • To introduce students to the tools and techniques of project management
  • To introduce students to the whole project life cycle in housing projects from inception to post-occupancy operation and maintenance
  • To introduce students to the structure, nature and dynamics of inter-personal and inter-organizational relationships and networks in the management of projects
  • To emphasize the role of projects in realising client organizational strategy
  • To introduce students to the specific problems of managing housing projects

Learning outcomes

At the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • Understand the principles and practices of project management
  • Critically discuss the links between academic literature on project management, housing, and the everyday experience of managing housing projects;
  • Understand the roles played by different stakeholders in housing projects
  • Recognise interpersonal and inter-organizational problems
  • Assess the role of the project in the client’s organizational strategy
  • Critically assess observed practice in managing housing projects

Structure/Outline

SessionTopic

 1
 

Introduction
 

2
 

Housing projects: development process and project life cycles
 

3
 

Controlling housing projects
 

4
 

Project organisation and managing relationships
 

5
 

Managing risk, delivering quality, innovation and sustainability
 
 
READING WEEK
 

6
 

Managing housing projects 1: Housing estate renewal
 

7
 

Managing housing projects 2: Garden cities for tomorrow
 

8
 

Managing housing projects 3: Brownfield and community ownership
 

9
 

Managing housing projects 4: Community-led development
 

10
 

Conclusions

Staff

Dr Jessica Ferm
View Jessica's profile
Email: ucftjef@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

The module will be assessed through a single piece of individual coursework of 2,500 words (representing 100% of the mark).  

Criteria for assessment(s)

The generic criteria applicable to essays will be applied (see course handbook or Bartlett School of Planning feedback sheet template).  Any specific criteria for the coursework to be prepared for this module will be communicated when the assignment is set and posted on Moodle. 

Deadlines and mode of submission

Submission is via Moodle. The deadline will be after the end of Term 2 and will be specified in the course outline and on Moodle.

Feedback (formative and summative)

Guidance and support available to students before the coursework is due (formative feedback):

You are strongly encouraged to discuss with your tutor(s) the preparation of the coursework before submission.  Students are encouraged to submit assignment outlines for discussion during ‘surgery’ sessions, which should be arranged with the module coordinator in advance.  The coordinator will set these up towards the end of Term 2.

Summative feedback

The marking sheet with detailed feedback will be returned to you within 20 working days (i.e. 4 weeks) via Moodle.

Indicative reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle. Below is an indicative list of relevant books for broader reading.

Core texts

  • Morris, P. (2013) Deconstructing Project Management. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Golland, A., and Blake, R. (2004) Housing Development: Theory, process and practice, London, Routledge

Further reading

  • Adams, D. (1994) Urban Planning and the Development Process.  London: Routledge.
  • Adams, D., & Watkins, C. (2008). Greenfields, brownfields and housing development. John Wiley & Sons.
  • Ahlava, A., & Edelman, H. (Eds.). (2009). Urban Design Management: A Guide to Good Practice. Taylor & Francis.
  • Carmona, M., Carmona, S., & Gallent, N. (2003). Delivering new homes: Processes, planners and providers. Psychology Press.
  • Chapman, C., & Ward, S. (2011). How to manage project opportunity and risk: Why uncertainty management can be a much better approach than risk management. John Wiley & Sons.
  • Diamond, J., & Liddle, J. (2005). Management of regeneration: choices, challenges and dilemmas. Psychology Press.
  • Latham, Sir M (1994) Constructing the Team: Joint review of Procurement and Contractual Arrangements in the UK Construction Industry, HMSO, London
  • Lock, D. (2004) Project Management in Construction, Farnham: Gower, Aldershot
  • Morris, P. & Hough, G. (1987) The Anatomy of Major Projects: A study of the reality of project Management, John Wiley, New York
  • Pryke, S.D. & Smyth, H.S (2006) The Management of Complex Projects: A Relationship Approach, Blackwell Science Ltd,  Oxford.
  • Raftery, J. (1994) Risk Analysis in Project Management.  London & NY: E&FN Spon
  • Rovers, R., & Klinckenberg, F. (2008). Sustainable housing projects: implementing a conceptual approach. Techne Press.
  • Walker, A. (2007) Project Management in Construction (5th ed).
  • Wilkinson, S. & Read, R. (2008) Property Development (5th Ed).  Routledge. 
BENVGHD2 The Economics and Finance of Housing Projects

This module provides the key economic concepts and tools for analysing housing markets. The students gain understanding of consumer and developer behaviour by looking at a range housing market structures, supply and demand issues, location and land use effects.

There is also a strong focus on examining housing finance and investment options through relevant case studies. The latest economic thinking and research is presented for a range of topical issues such as sustainable housing, housing market cycles and the recent crisis.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module comprises ten two-hour classes.  Each class comprises a pair of 45 minute lecture, with a break in between - for questions or refreshments. There will also be a number of tutorials, each providing exercises and applications of the lecture material, along with in depth discussion of selected literature in some cases. 

Aims & Outcomes

The expected outcomes of this module is understanding of core economics concepts applied in the housing context, such as supply, demand, budget constraints, macro-economic cycles, as well as understanding of key financial structures and instruments in housing development. The students will be also able to evaluate the wider economic effects of new housing development and of public policy changes in housing.

Structure/Outline

(Please note that each topic may consist of more than one lectures)

  1. Introduction housing economics and key economic concepts and tools  
  2. Urban economics, consumer behaviour and location selection, land use, density and housing supply (construction).
  3. Housing market structures and hedonic pricing, valuation and appraisal. 
  4. Macro-economics and Housing, Economic cycles, subprime mortgages and the crisis. 
  5. Private housing finance, mortgages, housing development and investment portfolios.
  6. Affordable housing, local authority and housing associations’ finance.
  7. The economics and finance of sustainable housing.

Staff

Dr Kwame Addae-Dapaah
View Kwame's profile
Email: k.addae-dapaah@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Unseen exam for 100% of the assessment, 2 hours duration on May/June 2015

Feedback

Tutorials are partly established to support students and provide a guidance on how to approach the exam questions. Furthermore, a list of indicative exam questions will be supplied to the students and discussed thereafter. There will also be a review sessions in autumn and spring, where the students will be informed of what will be expected in the exam.

Indicative reading

Course Texts

  • McDonald, John F. and Daniel P. McMillen, 2011. Urban economics and real estate: theory and policy. John Wiley & Sons, London, UK
  • Oxley, Michael, 2004. Economics, Planning and Housing. Palgrave Macmillan
  • Davis, Cathy, 2013. Finance for housing: an introduction. Policy Press, Bristol UK

Supplementary Reading 

  • Dunse, Neil A., Sotirios Thanos, and Glen Bramley. (2013). “Planning Policy, Housing Density and Consumer Preferences,” Journal of Property Research, 30, 221-238.
  • Glaeser, E. L., Gyourkob, J. & Saizb, A. (2008) Housing supply and housing bubbles, Journal of Urban Economics, 64, pp. 198–217.
  • Green, R. K., Malpezzi, S. & Mayo, S. K. (2005) Metropolitan-specific estimates of the price elasticity of supply of housing, and their sources, American Economic Review, 95(2), pp. 334–339.
  • Haurin, D., McGreal, S., Adair, A., Brown, L., Webb, J.R., 2013. List price and sales prices of residential properties during booms and busts, Journal of Housing Economics 22, 1-10
  • Isakson, H.R., 2002. The Linear Algebra of the Sales Comparison Approach, Journal of Real Estate Research 24, 117–128.
  • Jones, Colin, White, Michael and Neil Dunse (2012) Challenges of the housing economy: an international perspective.
  • Kuminoff, N. V., Jarrah, A. S., 2010. A new approach to computing hedonic equilibria and investigating the properties of locational sorting models, Journal of Urban Economics 67, 322-335
  • Pryce, G. & Gibb, K. (2006) Submarket dynamics of time to sale, Real Estate Economics, 34(3), pp. 337–415
  • Thanos, S., White, M. (2014), Expectation Adjustment in the Housing Market: Insights from the Auction System in Scotland. Housing Studies, 29 (3): 339-361
  • Waldron, Matt and Fabrizio Zampolli (2010) The Rise in Home Prices and Household Debt in the UK: Potential Causes and Implications. In Susan J. Smith Beverley A. Searle Eds “The Blackwell Companion to the Economics of Housing: The Housing Wealth of Nations”, pp: 105-125. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester UK
  • Whitehead, Christine M E and Scanlon, Kathleen (2011) The UK and Europe’s selective housing bubble In: Bardhan, Ashok and Edelstein, Robert and Kroll, Cynthia, (eds.) Global housing markets: crises, policies, and institutions. John Wiley & Sons, London, UK, 173-194. ISBN 9780470647141
  • Watkins, C. (2001) The definition and identification of housing submarkets, Environment and Planning A, 33, pp. 2235–2253.
  • Zuehlke, T. W. (1987) Duration dependence in the housing market, The Review of Economics and Statistics, 69(4), pp. 701–709.

I will list other key reading in lectures, and circulate some electronically.

Articles on housing economics and finance are published in an array of major economic, geography and real estate journals, but there are also journal focusing more on housing economics, indicatively: Journal of Housing Economics, Housing Studies and Journal of Urban Economics which is one of the top in the wider disciple.

Using Google Scholar, you should be able to locate a good selection of articles on all the topics dealt with in this module.  Because of the college’s electronic subscriptions, you will be able to download most of these articles in PDF. The Bartlett and Main Libraries also hold many hard copies of relevant journals.

BENVGHD3 Critical Debates in Housing Development

This module introduces students to critical thinking on a range of housing development and broader housing themes. It is organized along two complementary streams that alternate weekly:

Stream 1: 5 seminars that cover UK perspectives on planning, development, politics and democracy (). 

Stream 2: 5 seminars that cover international perspectives on housing systems across Europe, their different impacts on urban inequalities and urban processes (gentrification, affordability, etc.), and on the well-being of communities and societies. 

Aims & Outcomes

The overall aim of the module is to introduce students to a range of key ideas and to encourage reflections on the importance of these ideas for current planning and housing. By the end of the module, through active seminar discussions centred on key readings, students will have gained a reflective understanding of some of the critical debates in housing development, providing them with deeper insight into key policy agendas and societal and urban implications.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module comprises ten sessions of interactive small-group seminar discussions centred on key readings.  Students need to undertake the required readings in advance of each session.

Structure/Outline

The module comprises 10 seminar sessions, for which a list of key readings will be provided. Indicative topics:

Week 1    Housing Problems as ‘Wicked’ Problems (UK)
Week 2    Housing: The 'Wobbly' Pillar of Welfare (International)
Week 3    Strategic Planning for Housing – the Why and the How (UK)
Week 4    Housing Systems in Europe - paradigms and consequences (Europe)
Week 5    Questions of Affordability, Access and Approaches to Affordable Housing Development (UK)
Reading week
Week 6    Changing Housing Systems – the national perspective (Europe)
Week 7    Housing Politics – NIMBYism, BANANAs, and Consensus (UK)
Week 8    Changing Housing Systems – the urban perspective (Europe)
Week 9    Community Action and Neighbourhoods (UK)
Week 10    Tenure-Mixing and Regeneration (International)

Staff

Dr Sonia Arbaci
View Sonia's profile
Email: s.thanos@ucl.ac.uk

Professor Nick Gallent
View Nick's profile
Email: n.gallent@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Coursework: 100%

Description of assessment(s)

  • seminars, preparatory template and reading discussion (30%) / weekly submission
  • essay for Stream 1 (35%) / submission beginning Term 3 (to be confirmed)
  • essay for Stream 2 (35%) / submission beginning Term 3 (to be confirmed)

Indicative Reading

The module comprises 10 seminar sessions, for which a list of key readings will be provided in Moodle and module outline. Students need to undertake the required readings in advance of each session. 

BENVGID1: Inter-disciplinary Urban Design

Teaching and Learning Methods

The methods of delivery will vary hugely depending on the selections made by participants to populate their ‘black box’.  Students may encounter studio teaching, formal lectures, analytical modeling, small group tutorials and discussion, formal presentations, field trips, and a wide range of other diverse teaching techniques. 

During the development of the final research proposal the module will be supported by the MRes supervisory system.

Aims

This module has three main aims:

  • The development of in-depth knowledge and skills in urban design and the development of aptitudes to urban design as an inter-disciplinary research arena
  • An understanding of the academic / disciplinary lenses through which the component parts of the module are taught as a means to develop a cross-disciplinary perspective on the study and practice of urban design
  • An in-depth understanding of methods and approaches to the study of urban design that will be relevant / appropriate to the understanding of complex urban problems.

Learning Outcomes

This module draws from a range of named feeder modules from across the Bartlett and UCL, each of which explores the broad territory of urban design from a different perspective.  This ‘black box’ of elements is given shape by participants who select components:

  • According to their own academic backgrounds and professional experiences in order to further develop their knowledge, skills and aptitudes – in-depth
  • In order to understand the academic / disciplinary lens through which the material of the module is taught as a means to develop a cross-disciplinary perspective on the study of urban design
  • As a means to gain in-depth understanding of methods and approaches to the study of urban design that will be relevant / appropriate to their own individual research projects.

Structure/Outline

This module draws from a range of named feeder modules from across The Bartlett and UCL, each of which explores the broad territory of urban design from a different perspective. 

This ‘black box’ of elements is given shape by students themselves who select components: 

i) according to their own academic backgrounds and professional experiences so as to further develop their knowledge, skills and aptitudes – in-depth 

ii) in order to understand the academic / disciplinary lens through which the material of the module is taught as a means to develop a cross-disciplinary perspective on the study of urban design 

iii) as a means to gain in-depth understanding of methods and approaches to the study of urban design that will be relevant / appropriate to their own individual research projects.

75 credits of modules should normally be chosen, ideally from at least three different parts of The Bartlett and UCL. Feeder courses into the module include, although are not limited to:

Department of Anthropology
School of Architecture
Development Planning Unit
Space Syntax Laboratory
Department of Economics
School of Planning

Imperial College London: Centre for Transport Studies

Institute for Environmental Design and Engineering

Department of Geography

Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis

Institute for Global Health

Staff

Dr Filipa Wunderlich
View Filipa's profile 
Email: f.wunderlich@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Assessment of the module will constitute the combined final assessment from each feeder module, weighted by credit allowance

Criteria for assessment

Various, depending on feeder modules chosen.

Deadlines and mode of submission

Various, depending on feeder modules chosen.

Feedback (formative and summative)

Various, depending on feeder modules chosen.

BENVGID2 Urban Investigations

Urban Investigations is a core module of the MRes in Interdisciplinary Urban Design, and builds upon the wide-ranging research and professional expertise in urban design found across The Bartlett.

It exposes students to the series of urban scale research projects / problems being examined at UCL (and beyond) and offers the opportunity to discuss and experiment with the latest urban research theories and methodologies, processes and practices.  These provide a fundamental underpinning for the production of an urban design research proposal later in the year.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is composed of 20 sessions, all lecture-led. Lectures will be structured in two equal parts: i.e. lecture and discussion time (Q&A), which will continuously require the full participation and engagement of students with the lecturer.

Aims

  • To allow students to explore and understanding of the diversity in urban design approaches: theoretical and methodological, in process and in practice.
  • To develop students’ critical thinking and analytical skills in understanding urban design research at large, with a particular focus on the place of urban design in wider socio-economic, political and environmental discourses.
  • To demonstrate the ability to analyse and evaluate recent theoretical debates in urban design
  • To fully understand the complexity of urban design by exploring urban design as a discipline, process and as a practice.
  • To develop skills in the use of methods appropriate to researching the urban scale, exploring among qualitative, quantitative and mixed modes of enquiry
  • To demonstrate the ability to identify a research question and select and articulate appropriate existing theoretical and methodological frameworks for designing a cohesive research proposal
  • To develop a full understanding of the three essentials of a research framework design i.e. philosophical assumptions about what constitutes knowledge claims, general research procedures (i.e. strategy of enquiry) and methods (i.e. detailed procedures of data collection, analysis and writing).
  • To show the effective and ethical use of bibliographical information technology and other resources to undertake research
  • To develop personal, inter-personal and effective research management skills to become a high-quality researcher
  • To produce an effective research proposal that can inform urban design thinking, processes and better practice.

Structure/Outline

Please note that an up-to-date programme will be uploaded to Moodle.

Session 1    Investigating urban design: what, why and how?
Session 2    The politics of space production: the case of Macau
Session 3    The Experience of Space: Architecture and Cities
Session 4    From Critical Spatial Practice to Site-Writing
Session 5    Density and built form
Session 6    Historical Method in Urban Design
Session 7    Towards an architecture of engagement: researching contested urbanism and informalities
Session 8    Understanding space and place
Session 9    space syntax: interdisciplinary urban design pedagogy
Session 10    Changing people by changing the built environment?
Session 11    Capital Spaces: researching public space
Session 12    Visualisations, quantitative methods and spatial analysis
Session 13    Scientific pluralism: “is water H2O?”
Session 14    Interdisciplinary research methods
Session 15    Methods in urban anthropology
Session 16    The food city
Session 17    Urban design practice: an international review
Session 18    Design(ing) for London
Session 19    PUBLICA in a rapidly changing London
Session 20    Final individual tutorials + proposal draft discussion

Staff

Paula Morais
View Paula's profile
Email: p.morais@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

i) Description of assessment(s):

the module will be assessed through two short written exercises (essays) and a final research proposal:

  • Task 1: Essay (30% weight of the final mark)
  • Task 2: Essay (20% weight of the final mark)
  • Task 3: Research proposal (50% weight of the final mark)

ii) Deadlines and mode of submission:

  • Task 1: 12th December
  • Task 2: 13th February
  • Task 3: 27th April

iii) Feedback (formative and summative)

Regular feedback via the MRes supervisory system

Indicative Reading

  • Carmona, M. (Ed) (2014): Explorations in Urban Design, An Urban Design Research Primer (London: Ashgate)
  • Carmona et al. (2010): Public Places-Urban Spaces: the dimensions of urban design, 2nd Edition (Architectural Press)
  • Carmona and Tiesdell (Ed) (2006): Urban Design reader (Architectural Press)
  • Castells, M. (1983): The City and the Grassroots, A Cross-Cultural Theory of Urban Social Movements (Berkeley: University of California Press)
  • Creswell, W (2013): Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (Sage)
  • Creswell, W (2007): Qualitative Inquiry & Research Design: Choosing among five approaches (Sage)
  • Cuthbert, A., (2011): Understanding Cities : Method in Urban Design (Taylor & Francis)
  • Cuthbert, A., (2007): Urban design: requiem for an era – review and critique of the last 50 years, Urban Design International 12, pg. 177-223
  • Cuthbert, A., (2006): The Form of Cities: Political Economy and Urban Design (Taylor & Francis)
  • Knight and Ruddock (Ed) (2008): Advanced Research Methods in the Built Environment (Wiley-Blackwell)
  • Lefebvre, H. (1974, 1978): The Production of Space (Wiley-Blackwell)
  • Loew, S. (2012): Urban Design Practice: An International Review (RIBA Publishing)
  • Lynch, K. (1960): The Image of the City (the MIT Press)
  • Madanipour, A. (2014): Urban Design, Space and Society  (Palgrave Macmillan)
  • Madanipour, A. (1996): Design of Urban Space: An Inquiry into a Social-Spatial Process (John Wiley & Sons)
  • Zeisel, J. (1984): Inquiry by design: tools for environment-behaviour research (Cambridge University Press)
BENVGID3: Urban Design Research Project

The Urban Design Research Project represents an in-depth exploration of a complex topic / problem. It will provide a demonstration of theoretical knowledge and rigorous and incisive analysis, and will typically also be propositional, in the sense that it will demonstrate the application of this knowledge to urban design as a series of practices. The project should embrace the complexity of the chosen topic and apply knowledge in a critical and reflective manner.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Both the preparation of your proposal and the conduct of your research project will be fully supported by the MRes supervisory system through an allocated supervisor. You will be expected to arrange regular meetings with your allocated supervisor, and the BENVGID3 Urban Design Research Project module coordinator will also be available as back-up supervisor as and when required.

Aims

  • To produce an innovative and original study that contributes new knowledge within the discipline of urban design
  • To gain and demonstrate aptitudes to urban design as an inter-disciplinary research
  • arena, and to contribute to furthering the practices of urban design
  • To explore, in-depth, one or more of the various academic / disciplinary lenses shaping urban design that you have explored in the programme, as a means to frame and conduct your study
  • To successfully execute methods and approaches to the research of urban design that are relevant / appropriate to the understanding of complex urban problems
  • To deliver a rigorous, reflective, incisive and professional research project

Learning Outcomes

The Urban Design Research Project is the culmination of the MRes programme, and therefore also a chance to synthesise, in a major and largely self-managed study, key dimensions of what you have gained from the course and, possibly, to integrate it with elements from previous studies or professional experiences. This is something you can take with you, use to demonstrate your expertise and launch the next stage of your career.

Structure/Outline

MRes research projects are by their nature student-driven exercises that should draw from, and allow students to reflect on, the range of subject-matter covered in their taught modules.

An Urban Design Research Project involves stages of problem definition, problem scoping, analysis, synthesis and the advancing of carefully justified proposals for positive change, whether to a particular site, policy, or process, in relation to a discourse within the broad urban design field.

You will need to demonstrate abilities in research topic design, execution and presentation and a capacity for in-depth critical thinking in your chosen area of study.

A residential weekend retreat will be organized in May in order to discuss research proposals.

Timetable

 1     Introduction     31st October
 2     Submission of topic statement      13th February
 3     Allocation of supervisors     28th February
 4     Submission of research proposal     27th April
 5     Weekend retreat     22nd-24th May
 6     Final submission of research project     7th September
 7     Viva examination     29th September

Staff

Juliana Martins
View Juliana's profile 
Email: j.martins@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

i) Description of assessment(s):

The Urban Design Research Project will culminate in a 15,000 word project report and a viva oral examination attended by the supervisor and one or other of the Director or Deputy Director of the MRes.  This forms part of the formal examination process.

ii) Deadlines:

Final submission of project report: 7th September
Viva examination: 29th September

BENVGMP1 Mega Infrastructures as Agents of Change

This is the foundation module for MSc Mega Infrastructure programme, exploring the role of mega projects as agents of strategic change and urban development in the context of globalisation and sustainability.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching method is a combination of 10 two-hour thematic lectures plus occasional supporting individual tutorials, private reading and essay preparation. The bulk of the lectures for this module (six) will be given by OMEGA Centre staff drawing extensively from the Centre’s research findings. These contributions will be complemented by two contributions from non OMEGA Centre UCL staff and a further two outside visiting teaching staff. All materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in parts of the Bartlett.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions. All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in the Bartlett School of Planning. Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

The principal aim of the course module is to impart critical information concerning issues and contexts involved in the planning, appraisal and delivery of mega infrastructure investments as agents of change under forces of globalisation. The course in particular seeks to:

  • Demonstrate trends and challenges that mega infrastructure developments are facing in the 21st Century.
  • Illustrate principal generic features of mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans.
  • Clarify, define and explain key issues in mega-infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Explain the role of mega infrastructure investments as strategic agents of change, especially regarding economic growth, urban agglomeration impacts, climate change and social development.
  • Compare principal generic features and contexts of mega infrastructure projects, programmes & plans in developed and developing economies.
  • Examine what factors constitute the success of mega infrastructure delivery and criteria employed to arrive at such judgements.

Outcomes include:

  • Acquisition of understanding of the way mega infrastructure projects, plans and programmes are conceived, appraised and implemented, and their perceived role in urban, regional and national development Attainment of clear overview of critical stakeholder issues involved in mega infrastructure development.
  • Appreciation of characteristics of mega infrastructure developments in different contexts.
  • Acquisition of basic knowledge derived from international lessons of previous mega infrastructure investments.

Structure/Outline

Week 1    Trends & challenges of mega projects in the 21st Century (HD)
Week 2    Defining mega projects & problems with project boundaries (HD)
Week 3    Demand for mega projects & associated visions of development (HD)
Week 4    Mega projects, globalisation & trade (HD)
Week 5    Mega urban regeneration/redevelopment projects as agents of socio-economic, territorial & technological change
Week 6    Reading week
Week 7    Mega transport projects as agents of socio-economic, territorial & technological change (HD)
Week 8    Mega energy projects as agents of socio-economic, territorial & technological change
Week 9    Mega projects, climate change & project retrofitting
Week 10    Stakeholder management challenges of mega project development
Week 11    Importance of context to critical success factors: generic & context-sensitive lessons (HD)

Staff

Professor Harry Dimitriou
View Harry's profile 
Email: h.dimitriou@ucl.ac.uk

BENVGMP2 Infrastructure, Planning, Appraisal & Delivery Toolbox

This module introduces traditional infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery tools, for example, cost-benefit analysis, and reviews their contribution to assessing project success and financial viability.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching method is a combination of 10 two-hour thematic lectures plus occasional supporting individual tutorials, private reading and essay preparation. The bulk of the lectures for this module (six) will be given by OMEGA Centre staff drawing extensively from the Centre’s research findings.

These contributions will be complemented by two contributions from non OMEGA Centre UCL staff and a further two outside visiting teaching staff. All materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in parts of the Bartlett.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions. All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning.

Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

The principal aim of this course module is to provide an understanding of the essential background to the traditional tools for mega infrastructure planning appraisal and delivery. The course seeks to:

Explain the principal planning, appraisal and delivery tools applied to recent mega infrastructure investments in terms of their theoretical constructs and their functional roles for estimating future costs and benefits.

Demonstrate the trajectory of decision-making in mega infrastructure development.

Illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional planning and appraisal tools for mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans, particularly Cost Benefit Analysis.

Clarify, define and explain the major problems and opportunities arising from the use of these traditional tools in the context of public, private and public/private sponsored projects.

Outcomes include:

  • Acquire an understanding of the theoretical and empirical elements and premises of the traditional tool box for mega infrastructure investments planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Attain a clear overview of the critical issues involved in the traditional tool box and its historical evolution with an appreciation of how these relate to the geographical, temporal and other contextual considerations of their employment.
  • Understand the principal economic, environmental, social and political challenges facing decision-makers in mega infrastructure development and how to tackle the tensions generated by their interface.
  • Gain an insight into how the various tools/techniques may be differently used/valued by different stakeholders for public, public/private and private sector projects.
  • Appreciation of strengths and weaknesses of the traditional tool box for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery
  • Acquire the ability to match the theoretical elements of the traditional tools with the practical challenges faced by current mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans.

Structure/Outline

Week 1    The mega project life-cycle (RH)
Week 2    Mega project demand & cost-revenue forecasting methods (RH)
Week 3    Mega Project cost feasibility studies & funding sources (RH)
Week 4    Discounting & cost benefit analysis (RH)
Week 5    Externalities, public goods & monetisation (visiting lecturer)
Week 6    Reading week
Week 7    Measurement of intangibles, compensation tests & distribution of benefits (visiting lecturer)
Week 8    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: public sector funded mega projects (visiting lecturer)
Week 9    Treatment of mega project risk, uncertainty & complexity: private sector funded mega projects (visiting lecturer)
Week 10    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: public/private partnership funded mega projects (visiting lecturer)
Week 11    Strengths & limitations of the traditional appraisal tool box (RH)

Staff

Dr John Ward
View John's profile 
Email: eric.ward@ucl.ac.uk

BENVGMP3 Risk, uncertainty & complexity in decision-making

This module introduces the role of Risk, Uncertainty and Complexity in decision-making in mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery, drawing on lessons from other professions / disciplines.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching method is a combination of 10 two-hour thematic lectures plus occasional supporting individual tutorials, private reading and essay preparation. The bulk of the lectures for this module (six) will be given by OMEGA Centre staff drawing extensively from the Centre's research findings.

These contributions will be complemented by two contributions from non-OMEGA Centre UCL staff and a further two outside visiting teaching staff. All materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in parts of the Bartlett.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions. All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning.

Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

The principal aim of this course module is to impart knowledge of the treatment of risk, uncertainty and complexity in decision-making for planning, appraising and delivering mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans.

The critical importance of context and the generic and context-specific lessons related to what constitutes successful mega infrastructure investments in terms of its resilience and robustness to change will be emphasised and explained.

The module also seeks to highlight the role and importance of strategic planning in addressing the complexity confronted both within infrastructure development and the environments in which it is planned, appraised and delivered. The course in particular seeks to:

  • Clarify and elaborate key theoretical elements of risk, uncertainty and complexity in decision-making for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Foster an understanding of the use of strategic planning (and scenarios) and strategic management in response to challenges of complexity.
  • Examine current practices and likely futures in the treatment of risk, uncertainty and complexity for mega infrastructure development and the importance of critical contexts, both internal and external to the project.
  • Review the contemporary use/misuse of concepts of complexity analysis, uncertainty and risk-taking in mega infrastructure investment.
  • Clarify, define and explain challenges and opportunities arising from strategic planning.

Outcomes include:

  • Acquisition of knowledge of the theoretical and empirical elements of risk, uncertainty and complexity in mega- infrastructure project, programme and plan decision-making.
  • Appreciation of the critical value of strategic (and scenario) planning in the face of complex and dynamic challenges in mega infrastructure decision making in environments of uncertainty.
  • Attainment of an understanding of the importance and influences of context in decision-making for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Acquisition of generic skills of strategic planning and risk management distilled from other professions/disciplines where risk, uncertainty and complexity are at the milieu of their planning.
  • Appreciation of the utility of concepts of complexity, uncertainty and risk-taking in mega infrastructure investment appraisal.

Structure/Outline

Week 1    Strategic decision-making: treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity (EJW)
Week 2    Risk, uncertainty & complexity: importance of context & strategic thought (HTD)
Week 3    Strategy formulation methods & scenarios: treatment of big bets & win-win strategies
Week 4    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: open & closed systems
Week 5    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: lessons from the military
Week 6    Reading week
Week 7    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: lessons from finance & banking
Week 8    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: lessons from medicine (EJW)
Week 9    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: lessons from earthquake engineering
Week 10    Treatment of risk, uncertainty & complexity: lessons from city & regional development
Week 11    Generic and context-specific lessons (EJW)

Staff

Dr John Ward
View John's profile 
Email: eric.ward@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% coursework (course essay of 2,500 words)

Indicative Reading

  • J. Friend & A. Hickling (2005) Planning Under Pressure, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford
  • J. Adams (1995) Risk, University College Press, London
BENVGMP4 Critical Issues in Mega Infrastructure Investments

This module provides an opportunity for in-depth reading, critical reflection and discussion around key themes and debates in the planning, appraisal and delivery of mega infrastructure projects.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is made up of an introductory lecture and a combination of seminar contributions provided by experienced practioners in mega infrastructure development focused on selected critical debates in mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery, followed by student presentations on these same themes based on a literature review of critical debates, reports and studies.

The topics and related reading material are structured around selected key themes related to the five other modules (Module 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7) of this MSc programme and the non-credit OMEGA seminar programme. Students will be asked to present a critical synopsis of the selected literature on a particular theme and to discuss it with the Module Tutor and Visiting Speakers.

At the end of the course each student should write a 2,500-word essay expanding on their seminar contribution. This essay carries 100% of the course marks. Continuous feedback on the study method is to be expected throughout. Participation in seminars as presenters of literature summaries or as discussants of its contents will take place throughout the course, with live feedback.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions. Reading material will be (where copyright permits) placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning.

Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Assistant Tutor will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

The principal aim of this course module is to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, critical reflection and discussion around key themes and debates connected with mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery of projects, programmes and plans.

The aim is to enable students to develop a deeper knowledge of critical issues, practices and theories of mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery and to form an integrated view of infrastructure investments in relation to its key areas of knowledge. The course in particular seeks to:

  • Introduce prevailing issues associated with 21st century mega infrastructure investments and stimulate critical thinking which can reflect to varied contexts.
  • Examine current practices and likely futures in the treatment of risk, uncertainty and complexity for mega infrastructure development and the importance of critical contexts, both in developed and developing economies.
  • Clarify, define and justify strategic criteria for components of a successful mega infrastructure development which meet the needs of sustainable communities.
  • Review the contemporary use/misuse of concepts of complexity analysis, uncertainty and risk-taking in mega infrastructure investment and planning.
  • Apply knowledge learnt from other modules in this programme and skills or communication and negotiation.

Outcomes include

  • Acquisition of a comprehensive understanding of the critical issues associated with mega infrastructure investments, strategic planning, decision-making and sustainability challenges and visions.
  • Attainment of a multi-lateral thinking when one faces complex nature of mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Acquisition of understanding of skills of bargaining and negotiation which can reflect knowledge learnt from the modules in this programme and experiences shared by the visiting speakers.
  • Appreciation of the strength and weakness of the conventional project appraisal tool and the new 21st century tool box proposed in this MSc programme.
  • Attainment of an understanding of the importance and influences of context in decision-making for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Appreciation of the utility of concepts of complexity, uncertainty and risk-taking in mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans.

Structure/Outline

Week 1    Introduction
Week 2    The Politics of Mega Projects
Week 3    The Institutional Planning & Regulatory Challenges of Mega Projects
Week 4    Mega Events and Mega Risks
Week 5    Great Planning Disasters Re-visited
Week 6    Reading Week
Week 7    Major Investment Challenges in Financing Mega Projects
Week 8    Strategic Organisational Challenges of Mega Projects
Week 9    Student Presentations
Week 10    Student Presentations
Week 11    Conclusions

Staff

Dr Dan Durrant
View Dan's profile
Email: daniel.durrant@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% coursework (course essay of 2,500 words)

BENVGMP5 21st Century Infrastructure, Planning & Appraisal Toolbox

This module introduces new tools for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery, including Multi Criteria Analysis and Cost Benefit/Effectiveness Analysis.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching method is a combination of 10 two-hour thematic lectures plus occasional supporting individual tutorials, private reading and essay preparation. The bulk of the lectures for this module (six) will be given by OMEGA Centre staff drawing extensively from the Centre’s research findings.

These contributions will be complemented by two contributions from non OMEGA Centre UCL staff and a further two outside visiting teaching staff. All materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in parts of the Bartlett.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions.

All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning.

Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor (assisted by Module Course Assistant Tutor) will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

The principal aim of this course module is to present a new overall strategic framework - with supporting policy and planning guidance plus appraisal and strategic management tools - for the planning, appraisal and delivery of mega infrastructure investments that seek to better address the challenges and uncertainties of the 21st century.

This new ‘tool kit’ aims to place risk, uncertainty and complexity, plus the importance of context, at the milieu of decision-making, drawing extensively from a variety of lessons derived from the critical review of a number of mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans (and their interrelationships) including those reviewed by the OMEGA Centre in its international case study of 30 mega projects.

The module in particular seeks to:

  • Provide generic and context specific lessons and guidelines for mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery in the face of increasing risks, uncertainties and complexities.
  • Explain interrelationships of planning, appraisal and strategic management tools that surround mega infrastructure development within the context of increased forces of globalisation and rising challenges of sustainable development.
  • Highlight the value of Multi-criteria Analysis (MCA) as an overarching framework for the treatment of qualitative and quantitative criteria in the planning, appraisal and delivery of mega infrastructure;
  • Explain the role of global and local policy frameworks (and related targets) from/for different sectors/disciplines that should inform mega infrastructure investment appraisal.
  • Emphasise the important appropriate role of Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) and CBA and their critical inputs to the MCA.
  • Illustrate why/how a wider range of agencies and stakeholders are inherently involved within the mega infrastructure decision-making processes, and how MCA can facilitate the adoption of a more inclusive/transparent approach to stakeholder decision-making.

Outcomes include:

  • Acquisition of knowledge and skills to develop new mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery frameworks.
  • Appreciation of critical differences between traditional and proposed C21st mega infrastructure planning and appraisal techniques under contemporary and future planning settings.
  • Attainment of an understanding of wider impacts of mega infrastructure on economic, environmental, social and institutional dimensions of sustainable development.
  • Acquisition of the appreciation of the importance of political systems and institutional contexts for effective and efficient mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery, and the role of politics and politicians in all this.
  • Appreciation of the relationship between mega infrastructure appraisal and delivery on policy-making at global, regional, national and local levels and vice versa.
  • Demonstrate the importance of strategic thought through mega infrastructure development to more effectively tackle the complexities involved in mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery - with practical examples providing invaluable insights of what works/does not work, and under which circumstances/contexts.

Structure/Outline

  • Lecture 1: Cost Benefit Analysis: not fit for purpose for mega projects (HTD)
  • Lecture 2: Cost Effectiveness Analysis: an alternative to CBA (EJW)
  • Lecture 3: Multi-Criteria Analysis: a new framework (VL#1)
  • Lecture 4: Multi-Criteria Analysis: global policy frameworks & targets (EJW)
  • Lecture 5: Multi-Criteria Analysis: national policy frameworks & targets (VL#2)
  • Lecture 6: Multi-Criteria Analysis: local policy frameworks & targets (VL#3)
  • Lecture 7: Multi-Criteria Analysis: policy frameworks & targets & role of CBA/CEA (VL#4) Lecture 8: Multi-Criteria Analysis: risk, uncertainty & complexity & 4 tests (EJW)
  • Lecture 9: Multi-Criteria Analysis: a worked example (EJW)
  • Lecture 10: Generic & context-specific lessons (HTD)

Staff

Dr John Ward
View John's profile 
Email: eric.ward@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% unseen written examination

BENVGMP6 Sustainability Visions and Challenges for Mega Infrastructure Investments

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching method is a combination of 10 two-hour thematic lectures plus occasional supporting individual tutorials, private reading and essay preparation. The bulk of the lectures for this module (eight) will be given by OMEGA Centre staff drawing extensively from the Centre’s international research findings.

These contributions will be complemented by two further two further contributions from visiting teaching staff. All materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice in parts of the Bartlett.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions. All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning.

Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning. Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor (assisted by Module Course Assistant Tutor) will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims & Outcomes

This course module is intended to encourage students to obtain a greater awareness of the sustainability challenges faced by mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans, to especially recognise the damage of rhetoric and explore ideas, propositions and debates in visions of mega infrastructure development that can engage both private and public sector decision-making more effectively and more innovatively.

The principal aims of the module are to impart information concerning critical issues and challenges facing mega infrastructure investments relating to visions of sustainability both locally and globally. In particular it seeks to:

  • Explore the more rigorous definition of the dimensions of sustainable development as they relate to mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Illustrate primary issues addressed by international organisations, government agencies and academic institutes in this field.
  • Explain challenges and opportunities of sustainability concerning political agendas and contextual changes under the forces of globalisation that mega infrastructure projects encounter.
  • Demonstrate various challenges that mega infrastructure projects, programmes and plans are facing within different disciplines.
  • Introduce the notion that institutional sustainability provides the glue and lubricant to the achievement of social, environmental and economic sustainability associated with mega infrastructure developments and their delivery agencies.
  • Introduce international and national policies for mega infrastructure.

Outcomes include:

  • Attainment of an understanding of wider impacts of mega infrastructure on sustainable economic, environmental, social and institutional dimensions.
  • Acquisition of knowledge of cross-disciplinary dimensions of sustainability and critical importance of sustainable institutions and governance as the glue to this joined-up approach.
  • Appreciation of the politics and rhetoric of sustainability vision building, planning and implementation and how to cope with this.
  • Understanding of the problems, practicalities and realities of operationalising the sustainability concept/vision in mega infrastructure investments and the role of targets.
  • Appreciation of relationship between international, regional, national and local policies, planning frameworks and agendas - and how trade-offs are achieved between actions at different levels/in different areas.
  • Acquisition of knowledge of government initiatives around the Green Economy, Green Enterprise and global trends of mega infrastructure projects, plans and programmes.
  • Appreciation of differences of sustainability challenges and visions of mega infrastructure investments between developed and developing economies

Structure/Outline

Week 1    Sustainability as an evolving multi-dimensional vision/concept (RH)
Week 2    Politics of sustainability: local, national & global (visiting lecturer)
Week 3    Environmental sustainability: local, national & global (visiting lecturer)
Week 4    Economic sustainability: local, national & global (RH)
Week 5    Social sustainability: local, national & global (RH)
Week 6    Reading Week
Week 7    Institutional sustainability: local, national & global governance (HTD)
Week 8    Sustainability, mega projects, corporate social responsibility & transparency (visiting lecturer)
Week 9    Qualities of a sustainable mega project: an unfortunate practice case study (visiting lecturer)
Week 10    Qualities of a sustainable mega project: a good practice case study (visiting lecturer)
Week 11    Generic & context-specific lessons (RH)

Staff

Dr Robin Hickman
View Robin's profile
Email: r.hickman@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% coursework (course essay of 2,500 words)

BENVGMP7 Student Group Project

Students undertake a commissioned study of the Thames Gateway area in this module, which integrates theoretical and empirical elements of mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This teaching is essentially in five parts:

(1) it commences with one session at which the presentation of the study TOR is made to the students by the client and background presentations are delivered of the study area regarding the issues to be addressed and kinds of study responses/reports expected;

(2) three group work sessions with the student body divided into specialist sub-groups each supervised by an academic member of staff;

(3) a fourth session at which issue Analysis Reports are to be presented by the students to the Client;

(4) a further four group working sessions under the supervision of individual tutors to complete the Draft Final Report;

(5) a final session at which the findings of the Draft Final Report is presented to the Client for comment. Visits to the site and write-ups of reports are expected to take place outside of the class sessions.

Student support will be provided as for the other modules in the programme by a mix of structured tutorials for groups, individual tutorials as needed and email responses to student questions.

All teaching materials will be placed on Moodle, as is standard practice at the Bartlett School of Planning. Course materials will support the overall programme aims, provide clear learning objectives and promote active learning.

Student support will be available in the classroom and on-line. The Module Tutor will be responsible for on-line course development and will oversee and deliver full support for staff involved in on-line teaching.

Aims and Outcomes

This exercise is intended to emphasise the development of problem-solving skills, highlight the importance of team work, develop communication and dissemination skills, and demonstrate the nature/role/expectations of infrastructure development consultancy exercises.

The principal aim of the module is to provide the opportunity for students to better understand and apply the information imparted by this programme to a practical project and equip them for future careers in mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery. The module in particular seeks to:

  • Review the knowledge learned from previous modules provided in this programme and to test this in a practice orientated context.
  • Convert/translate the knowledge and skills gained in relation to mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery into practice contexts.
  • Introduce and examine the role and responsibility of different mega-infrastructure organisations and the institutional frameworks within which they have to operate.

Introduce likely new situations and challenges associated with mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery in the future.

Outcomes include:

  • Acquisition of skills and techniques of problem-solving for mega infrastructure projects programmes and plans in a team work situation.
  • Acquisition of concepts of partnership and project network developments as a basis for better mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Attainment of experience of handling risks, uncertainties and complexities of mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Acquisition of awareness of the way different contexts (cultural, political and institutional forces) frame mega infrastructure planning, appraisal and delivery.
  • Appreciation of key concepts employed in the strategic planning process of mega infrastructure developments.
  • Apply and contrast techniques covered in the course: including EU and national policy instruments, project appraisal, creating and testing multiple regional scenarios and policy integration.
  • Gather Case Study evidence: accumulated in support (and defiance) of the concepts, issues and techniques highlighted.
  • Acquisition of skills of communication/dissemination, negotiation, strategic project management, team-working, and preparation of inception, issue and final report preparation.

Staff

Dr John Ward
View John's profile 
Email: eric.ward@ucl.ac.uk

Assessment

100% coursework: Group report 50% (1,500 words equivalent of each student); Individual report 25% (1,000 words each student); Presentational Skills 25%

BENVGPD1 Design and Real Estate

The best examples of British urban regeneration are created by collaboration between the development industry, architects and local planners.  Through site visits, presentations and critical interrogation, we learn how this is achieved.

The absence of municipal master planning in the UK creates opportunity and flexibility for the development sector, but requires unique planning skills to shape projects and represent the needs of the community.  

Students visit areas of major commercial development in Central London and receive presentations from senior property professionals, architects and planners.   The course covers key elements of master-planning, architectural design, real estate and project management, which combine to produce successful development projects in London, a world business city.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Student teams are assigned to one of the featured locations to identify the unique set of characteristics that form its identity as a place.  This activity is complimented by gathering information on local transport provision, accessibility and land use and a review of the local planning policies relating to development.  

These studies will culminate in team presentations “selling” the key attractions of the location, as a potential commercial investment opportunity, to a panel of development professionals at the final session.  

In addition, an individual submission will compare the merits and urban character of 2 contrasting London development locations.  This combination of team-working and concise presentation mirrors the “real world” of real estate. 

Aims & Outcomes

To develop through tutored walks, critical discussions and team work the ability to:

  • Analyse existing urban neighbourhoods and their regeneration/ development potential
  • Effectively communicate area assessments and opportunities, both orally and graphically

Structure/Outline

 Week 1Introduction
Weeks 2 – 5Visits to key commercial developments in London (tour and presentations)
 Reading Week
Weeks 7 – 10Visits to leading architects and planning consultants (presentations)
Week 11Team presentations to panel of experts

Staff

Professor Peter Rees CBE
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Patricia Canelas
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Edward Jones
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Assessment

Coursework: 100%

  • Task 1: Individual Report (40% of total marks).
  • Task 2:  Team Presentation (60% of total marks).

Indicative Reading

  • Adams, D. & Tiesdell, S. (2013). Shaping Places: Urban Planning, Design and Development. Routledge: London
  • Cullen, G. (1971). The Concise Townscape. Routledge: London
  • Hebbert, M. (1998). London, More by Fortune than Design. John Wiley & Sons: London
  • Jacobs, J. (1961). The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Random House LLC
  • Lynch, K. (1984). Good City Form. MIT Press
  • Massey, D. (2013). World City. John Wiley & Sons: London
  • Taylor, C. (2011). Londoners. Granta Books: London 

Website of:

GLA – The London Plan
City of London
City of Westminster
LB Hackney
LB Tower Hamlets - Adopted and Draft Local Plan Policies on Development Design and Office Use
Developers, Projects and Architects featured in the module

BENVGPD2 Critical Debates in Urban Design and City Planning

This module invites students to dive deep into the field of urban design knowledge. It will give an insight into the complex nature of urban design theory and encourage students to construct their own understandings of topics and rationale for urban design interventions. Rather than assimilating facts, students will be learning ‘to think urban design’, while also contribute to the constant evolution and up-grading of urban design knowledge. 

The module has further a practice focused component which enables students to apply and test their understanding and thinking about particular urban design topics through analytical and propositional project work that runs alongside the course.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module has two components: 

1. Weekly critical debates seminars with a focus on the above two key areas of debate. Under each of these areas of debate, each week will focus on a different topic to focus on (see details below); Students will need to deliver complete of a preparatory note for each class – a synopsis, and will be assessed based on this and their participation (see Assessment below and detail explanations in appended doc) 

2. Group project  focusing on ‘The principles and urban design: literature review and learning through experience’. Student will submit a final report at the end of the module.

Staff

Dr Filipa Wunderlich
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Dr Juliana Martins
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Dr Pablo Sendra
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Dr Michael Short
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Assessment

100% coursework.

Indicative Reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle.

BENVGPD3 Collaborative City Planning Strategies

This project-based module aims to apply the more theoretical concepts of city planning to a real life project and undertake a collaborative and applied approach to the understanding and inclusion of community visions and agendas in city planning. 

The project will enable students to work with community groups and to consider options for delivering inclusive development for a specific urban area in London.

Students will be asked to develop a design and policy response to urban development issues brought forward by local communities of residents and businesses affected by London’s need for urban intensification. 

The module is designed and delivered in partnership with Just Space. Just Space is a London-wide network of voluntary and community groups working together to influence planning policy at the regional, borough and neighbourhood levels. It grew from sharing information, research and resources on the Further Alterations to the London Plan in 2007. 

Just Space also works with The Bartlett School of Planning to facilitate research collaboration between community/activist groups and university staff and students. 

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module’s teaching philosophy rests on student-centred learning and consists of a mixture of: 

  • Lectures (tutor-led) 
  • Site visits and local surveys (student-led with some support by tutors and/or community groups) 
  • Tutorials (collaborative); 
  • Group presentations and work (student-led) 

Students are provided with some of the information they need to complete the task, but they are expected to identify additional useful data sources and literature for analysis. Students should also expect that details on the content and on the outputs of their group project could arise through discussion with community groups.

Aims & Outcomes

Upon completion of this module students will have developed a theoretical and practical understanding of: 

  • Collaborative and community-led planning 
  • Ethics of knowledge and plan co-production 
  • Sustainable urban intensification 
  • Planning for social inclusion 
  • Planning inclusive economic development 
  • Planning for genuinely affordable housing; alternative models of housing delivery 
  • Equity and participation in plan-making and development process 

The project aims to provide students with the skills to build evidence and prepare sustainable proposals for inclusive urban development as well as the opportunity to understand and engage with the impacts of city planning strategies on place and the life of residential and business communities in London.

Staff

Elena Besussi
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Dr Pablo Sendra
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Dr Michael Short
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Assessment

100% coursework.

Indicative Reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle.

BENVGPD4 Sustainable Futures by Design

The module provides students with a holistic approach to all the aspects of sustainability: social, cultural, economic and environmental.

It seeks to make students reflect on possible sustainable future cities by addressing issues that are currently at the forefront of the debate on urban design and city planning: how to make cities more inclusive, collaborative, consume less resources, interact with nature and, at the same time, strengthen its design and maintain and reuse its heritage.

The module combines design and theoretical reflection through a series of lectures, workshops and a design proposal.

The key topics of sustainability that the lectures and workshops address are:

  • City and Nature: interaction between humans, non-humans, city and nature. Land use, food, waste, urban fauna and flora.
  • Urban character and heritage.
  • Collaborative urbanism: participation, coproduction, co-design, collaborative economy.
  • Inclusive cities: social justice, culture, gender, age, democracy and welfare delivery.
  • Resource provision and consumption: water, energy, infrastructure, urban metabolism, consumption behaviour.

Aims & Outcomes

At the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate an overall understanding of the different aspects of sustainability: social, cultural, economic, environmental;
  • analyse the present situation addressing these different aspects of sustainability;
  • relate current academic debates on literature to the present situation and to urban design practice;
  • demonstrate the ability to develop an urban design proposal on a given site that envisages a sustainable future;
  • demonstrate creativity and originality in their ideas;
  • expose their ideas through oral presentations that link their design proposal to theoretical thinking;
  • present their ideas through graphic materials such as plans, sections, collages and other kind of media.

Structure/Outline

Week 1

Introduction to the module

Introductory lecture: Sustainable futures

Workshop: Sustainable futures

Week 2

Lecture: City and nature.

Workshop: City and nature

Week 3

Lecture: Urban character and heritage

Workshop: Urban character and heritage

Week 4

Lecture: Collaborative urbanism

Workshop: Collaborative urbanism

Week 5

Lecture: Resource Consumption

Lecture: Inclusive cities.

Reading seminar on inclusive cities

 Reading Week
Week 6-9Tutorials: Sustainable vision
Week 10Final presentations: Sustainable vision

Staff

Dr Pablo Sendra
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Dr Michael Short
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Coursework: 100%

  • Portfolio / workshops: 50%
  • Sustainable design vision project. Graphic report and oral presentation: 50%

Criteria for assessment

  • Understanding of the different readings of sustainability. 
  • Critical reflection, creativity and ability to present graphically and orally the ideas.

Indicative Reading

  • Carmona, M. (Ed.) (2014) Explorations in Urban Design. Farnham: Ashgate.
  • Hayden, D. (1995) The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History. MIT Press.
  • Healey, P. (2010) Making Better Places. Palgrave MacMillan: Basingstoke.
  • Landry, C. (2006) The Art of City Making. Earthscan: London.
  • Lefebvre, H. (1996) The right to the city. In: Writing on Cities: Henri Lefebvre. Edited and Translated by Eleonore Kofman and Elisabeth Lebas. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.
  • Zukin, S. (2010) Naked City: The Death and Life of Authentic Urban Places. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
BENVGPD5 City Planning

This module introduces students to the practice of city planning. It should enable them to develop a sound understanding of the purpose and goals of city planning, how it is practised, how it differs from urban design, what principal issues city planning has to deal with, and what key structures, techniques and methods are used to produce its plans.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught through a combination of lectures and reading-based, student-led seminars. Each week, a two-hour lecture session will be followed by a one-hour seminar. Subject to numbers on the course, students will be divided into eight seminar groups. Four groups will take part in a seminar one week. The following week the other four groups will take the seminar.

Each week, pairs of students will lead the seminar, submitting a written brief for marking. They will be marked based on the content of their brief and the quality of their leadership of the seminar, assessed by a member of staff present at the seminar.

Aims & Outcomes

By the end of the module, students should:

  • Understand important elements of planning theory and practice to enable them to participate fully in the discourse of city planning;
  • Have a working knowledge of the main goals of city planning;
  • Be aware of the key issues facing city planning in the 21st Century;
  • Be able to discuss city planning’s tools, techniques, structures and practices in an informed way;
  • Understand why city planners approach the preparation, writing and delivery of plans in the ways that they do;
  • Be aware of some of the differences between how city planning is approached in different cultures and polities;
  • Form judgements about the value of planning and the alternatives to it.

Staff

Dr Richard Simmons
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

  • 80% unseen written examination
  • 20% written seminar brief/assessment of student’s seminar

Students will each prepare and share leadership of one seminar during the module. The seminar will discuss one of the issues raised during the course lectures. Preparation will include studying set readings. Students will submit a short written summary (in note form) of their learning from the readings and relevant lecure(s) and state what questions the topic raises for city planning.

They will be paired with another student to lead the seminar discussion. Marks will be allocated based on the quality of the summary note and leadership of the discussion. More information and guidance will be provided at the start of the course.

There will be a two hour unseen written examination in term three, with questions based on the content of the module.

Indicative Reading

  • Rydin, Y. (2011) The purpose of planning: creating sustainable towns and cities, Bristol: Policy Press
  • Morphet, J. (2011) Effective Practice in Spatial Planning, London: Routledge
  • Glaeser, E. (2011) Triumph of the city, London: Macmillan
  • Hall, P. and Tewdwr-Jones M. (2010) Urban and Regional Planning. 5th Edition. Routledge, London
  • Farrell, T. (2014) The city as a tangled bank: urban design vs urban evolution, Chichester: Wiley
  • Wu, F. (2015) Planning for growth: urban and regional planning in China, New York: Routledge
  • Hall, P. (1998) Cities in civilization: culture, innovation, and urban order, London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson
  • Jacobs, J. (1964) The death and life of great American cities, Harmondsworth: Penguin (and many later reprints)
  • Harvey, D. (2012) Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, London: Verso
BENVGPL4, BENVGPLA, BENVGPLB  Pillars of Planning

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is composed of four 5-week series of lectures (two in Term 1, two in Term 2) introducing students to key concepts in four disciplines: 
- Urban Sociology (first half of Term 1), 
- Urban & Regional Economics (second half of Term 1), 
- Urban Environmental Management (first half of Term 2) and 
- Urban Politics (second half of Term 2).

There are no seminars or tutorials.

Students on the MSc Spatial and International Planning take the full module BENVGPL4 Pillars of Planning (30 credits).

Students from other programmes can take either the full module BENVGPL4 (running over two terms), or one of its 2 one-term components:

BENVGPLA Pillars of Planning A (15 Credits), Term 1: Urban Sociology + Urban & Regional Economics
BENVGPLB Pillars of Planning B (15 Credits), Term 2: Urban Environmental Management + Urban Politics.

Aims


This module explores the interrelationships between society and space and aims to stimulate 'critical thinking about space and place as the basis for action or intervention' (RTPI Policy Statement on Initial Planning Education) through the integrated study of social sciences as an analytical framework to understand urban change and planning interventions.

The course addresses issues of urban change on the basis of a critical understanding of relevant theories from urban sociology, urban environmental management, urban and regional economics, and urban politics.

An orientation towards problem identification, policy formulation and intervention is maintained throughout and students are encouraged to develop a sensitive understanding of the political, social, economic and environmental contexts which determine planning issues and policies.

The module aims:

  • to develop a critical understanding of processes of social, political, economic and environmental change in contemporary cities;
  • to provide an introduction to the key concepts and theories of sociology, economics, politics and urban governance, and urban and environmental management;
  • to explain the workings of local political, social and economic institutions; 
  • to develop an appreciation of the mechanisms used for dealing with such processes of change through policy interventions and planning;
  • to develop an understanding of the interacting roles of key actors in the social, economic and political arenas and to make their assumptions and values explicit. In addition, to explore the way various actors induce, control and cope with urban change;
  • to apply theory to practice in planning and urban management.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the module students should have developed:

  • a critical awareness of the significant social, political, environmental and economic debates of relevance to planners;
  • a critical awareness of the main processes of urban change in the UK and the main governance systems and policy mechanisms;
  • an awareness of the roles and values of decision-makers and stakeholders in the public and private sectors;
  • an understanding of the key social, economic, political and environmental management concepts and methods of analysis; and an appreciation of different viewpoints;
  • the skills necessary to exploit a wide variety of sources of information (academic books and journals, media and consultancy reports and government documents, electronic sources) in order an understanding of the relevant issues and methods for addressing them;
  • the skills necessary to lead and contribute to discussions demonstrating an in depth knowledge and understanding.

Structure/Outline

First half of Term 1: Urban Sociology (Claire Colomb)

This part of the module is concerned with the demographic and social changes affecting Britainís cities (and more widely European cities / cities of the Global North), with the theories that have been developed to understand the linkages between social and spatial change and with the policies which have been designed to address various urban socio-economic problems. An important theme is the effect of economic and social restructuring on patterns of social and spatial inequality in cities. The five sessions will deal with the following themes:

  • Understanding the spatial impacts of social, demographic and economic change
  • From socio-economic inequalities to spatial segregation and neighbourhood change
  • Changing society through interventions in urban space? A critical (sociological) look at urban policies
  • People and planning: public participation, protest and resistance in urban development processes
  • Planning for social diversity and difference

Second half of Term 1: Urban & Regional Economics (John Tomaney)

This part of the module is concerned with economic processes that transform cities and regions and the different theoretical approaches that have been developed to explain these. It examines five influential texts that have sought to explain urban and regional economic change. The five sessions will focus on the following themes:

  • How economists (don't) think
  • The inefficient city
  • Agglomeration and urban development
  • Capital accumulation and the city
  • Knowledge, creativity and the city

First half of Term 2: Urban Environmental Management (Fangzhu Zhang)

This part of the module aims to develop a sound knowledge, understanding and awareness of environmental issues. It also introduces basic environmental planning concepts. It identifies the causes, drivers and solutions for environmental planning.

It reviews advanced green technologies and eco-innovations, including renewable energies, waste management, green transportation, green building and energy efficiency. It also addresses how regulation and policies, economic instruments and educational tools can be used to encourage more environmentally-friendly behaviour and urban form.

The course discusses the approaches to build sustainable communities and eco-cities drawing from a range of international examples. The five sessions will deal with the following broad themes:

  • Introduction to urban environmental management
  • Renewable energies and waste management
  • Sustainable urban transport
  • Sustainable built environment: green building and energy efficiency
  • Sustainable communities and Eco-cities

Second half of Term 2: Urban Politics (Yasminah Beebeejaun)

This part of the module aims to introduce students to key concepts and theories of urban politics. †This will provide students with a critical understanding of the wider societal context within which planning discourse takes place. The five sessions will deal with the following broad themes:

  • City politics and urban governance
  • Cities, housing and social justice
  • Scale, context, and community
  • The changing role of technical expertise in spatial planning
  • Deliberative democracy and the civic realm

Staff

Dr. Claire Colomb (Urban Sociology)
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Dr. Fangzu Zhang (Urban Environmental Management)
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Professor John Tomaney (Urban Economics)
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Dr. Yasminah Beebeejaun (Urban Politics)
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Assessment

The assessment for the module is 100% by coursework. For students taking the full module BENVGPL4 Pillars of Planning (30 credits) over Term 1 and 2, the assessment includes 5 essays each carrying 20% of the total course mark: one 2,000 word essay for each of the four components of the module, and a final shorter synthesis essay.

For students taking either Pillars of Planning A (15 credits) or Pillars of Planning B (15 credits), the assessment includes 2 essays (one 2,000 word essay for each component) each carrying 50% of the total course mark.

The four tutors responsible for each component will define specific essay questions related to the key problematics of their subject matter (to be posted on Moodle). In order to maintain a coherent guiding thread throughout the four elements of the module, each student is required to choose one city which he/she will use as a case-study throughout ALL 5 essays. 

Indicative reading

The 4 tutors in charge of each of the 4 components of the module will post a detailed outline of their component, the description of the assignment, a bibliography/reading list, a set of useful resources and lectures notes on Moodle at the beginning of each 5-week series of lectures. 

BENVGPL5 Spatial Planning: Concepts and Context

Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the concept of spatial planning and its development within the UK urban and regional planning system. The module critically examines the evolution of the UK urban and regional planning system. It addresses the nature of the planning challenge, asks why we plan and investigates the role of the state in the planning system.

It charts and critically evaluates the development of the planning system from 19th century efforts to regulate rapid urbanisation and industrialisation through to the emergence of the post Second World War system of “Town and Country Planning”. It addresses the contemporary shift from “regionalism” to “localism” and the conflicts and controversies this embodies.

The module pays particular attention to 1) the distinction between traditional land-use planning and “spatial planning” approaches; 2) the relationship between planning, economic growth and sustainable development; and 3) the challenge of democratic accountability.

By the end of the module, students should have:

  • An awareness of the social, economic and environmental challenges faced by planners
  • A critical awareness of patterns of continuity and change in UK urban and regional planning
  • A knowledge of current UK planning debates

Learning Outcomes

This course is designed to achieve two main objectives:

  • first, to provide an opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and experience of the spatial planning process as a conceptual process.
  • second, to provide an arena for debates within which the students can develop:

a) their understanding of the spatial planning process in relation to political and policy objectives and their complexity,

b) their skills in critically reviewing these processes and their outcomes.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Hours of student’s time (Total = 100)

Lectures: 20
Seminars/workshops: 0             
Tutorials: 0
Private reading: 40          
Essays/projects: 40         
Site visits/field trips: 0

Structure/Outline

Week 1Introduction: the planning challenge
Week 2Government, governance and planning: the UK in comparative context
Week 3The British planning system in the 20th century
Week 4The European Context
Week 5Regionalism and spatial planning under New Labour
Week 6Reading week
Week 7Devolution and spatial planning in the UK
Week 8London: Planning the Global City
Week 9Localism and planning under the Coalition
Week 10Planning, growth and wellbeing
Week 11Conclusion: politics, policy and planning

Staff

Professor John Tomaney
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Assessment

One three-hour unseen examination paper

Indicative Reading

  • Tewdwr-Jones, M. and Allmendinger, P. (eds.) (2006), Territory, Identity and Spatial Planning: Spatial Governance in a Fragmented Nation, Routledge, London.
  • Healey, P. (2007), Urban Complexity and Spatial Strategies, Routledge, London.
  • Hall, P. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2011), Urban and Regional Planning, 5th edition, Routledge, London.
  • Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2011), Urban Reflections: Narratives of Planning, Place and Change, Policy Press, London.
  • Davoudi, S. and Strange, I. (eds) (2009), Conceptions of Space and Place in Strategic Spatial Planning, Routledge, London.
  • Haughton, G., Allmendinger, P., Counsell, D. and Vigar, G. (2010), The New Spatial Planning, Routledge, London.
  • Morphet, J. (2010), Effective Spatial Planning in Practice, Routledge, London.
BENVGPL6 Comparative Planning Systems and Cultures

The module aims to introduce students to the comparative study of different approaches to planning and planning systems in different national contexts. It will provide a framework for the comparative analysis of planning systems and practices across the world.

Students are encouraged to reflect about the context-specific nature of planning and the legal, social, political, economic and/or environmental conditions underpinning planning practice in different national and regional contexts. Students are also invited to consider the issues and challenges associated with the international mobility of planning and urban policy knowledge and practices.  

The module is team-taught, utilizing the spectrum of international staff and researchers based within the School of Planning and UCL as well as guest speakers. The focus is primarily on countries of the Global North (Europe and North America), although a number of sessions focus on the planning system of large fast-developing nations such as India, China and Brazil.  

Teaching and Learning Methods

Weekly lectures are combined with student-led seminar discussions of contemporary readings focused on the different contexts introduced in the module. Seminar discussions aim to promote critical reflection and debates, and to assist with exam revision. 

Aims & Outcomes

By the end of the module, students should have: 

  • Been introduced to a framework for the comparative study and understanding of different planning systems and cultures (how spatial planning is understood and organized in various countries) which can be applied beyond this module; 
  • Developed a sensitivity for the context-specific nature of planning and the legal, social, political, economic and/or environmental conditions underpinning planning systems, cultures, policies and practices in the different contexts examined;  
  • Understood the value and challenges of cross-national and cross-cultural comparative studies; 
  • Observed patterns of convergence and divergence between planning systems, policies and practices in various parts of the world; 
  • Engaged with the professional and academic debates regarding the global circulation of planning ideas, models and practices and critically reflected on their transferability / the potential for cross-national lesson drawing from abroad. 

Structure/Outline

The module is taught through a combination of lectures and reading-based, student-led seminars. Each week a 2-hour lecture session will be followed by a 1-hour seminar session. 

The first lecture will introduce the module and its core themes and learning objectives. This will be followed by 8 weeks of lectures delivered by different academic contributors covering different international contexts and examining various planning systems and models, as well as the unique challenges/issues encountered within each context.  

These lectures will be followed by a one-hour seminar facilitated by a member of staff. Seminars will be focused on in-depth discussion of key readings relating to planning in the national context introduced that week. The discussions will be student-led and assessed (described below), contributing to 20% of the overall module mark. The remaining 80% of the overall module mark will be assessed through examination in Term 3.  

Staff

Dr Susan Moore
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Dr Claire Colomb
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Professor Nick Phelps
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Dr Sonia Arbaci
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Dr Andrew Harris
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Dr Brian Webb 

Professor Fulong Wu
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Gabriel Sylvestre
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Dr Amparo Tarazona Vento
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Assessment

The module is assessed by:

  • coursework (20%) to be completed during Term 1 
  • unseen exam (80%) which will take place during Term 3  

The 20% coursework component for this module consists of the preparation of a critical summary note for an assigned reading, and of your contribution to a student-led seminar discussion. 

80% of the overall module mark will be assessed by a 2-hour unseen exam which will take place in Term 3. ‘Unseen’ means that the student does not know in advance what questions are going to be asked. 

More information in the module outline.

Indicative Reading

  • Gemitis, P. (2012) Comparing Spatial Planning Systems and Planning Cultures in Europe. The Need for a Multi-scalar Approach, Planning Practice and Research, 27(1): 25-40. 
  • Kantor, P. and Savitch, H.V. (2001) How to Study Comparative Urban Development Politics: A Research Note, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29(1): 135–51. 
  • Nadin, V. (2012) International Comparative Planning Methodology: Introduction to the Theme Issue, Planning Practice and Research, 27(1): 1-5. 
  • Reimer, M. and Blotevogel, H. (2012) Comparing Spatial Planning Practice in Europe: A Plea for Cultural Sensitization, Planning Practice and Research, 27(1): 7-24. 
  • Robinson, J. (2011) Cities in a World of Cities: The comparative gesture, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 35(1): 1-23.  
  • Watson, V. (2009) Seeing from the South: refocusing urban planning on the globe’s central urban issues, Urban Studies, 46(11): 2259-2275. 
  •  Booth, P. (2011) Culture, planning and path dependence: some reflections on the problems of comparison, Town Planning Review, 82(1): 13-28. 
  • Ernste, H. (2012) Framing Cultures of Spatial Planning, Planning Practice & Research, 27(1): 87-101. 
  • Friedmann, J. (2005) Globalization and the emerging culture of planning, Progress in Planning, 64(3): 183-234. 
  • Hamedinger, A.  (2014) The Mobility and/or Fixity of Urban and Planning Policies – The Role of Divergent Urban Planning Cultures, European Spatial Research and Policy, 21(1): 23–37. 
  • Janin Rivolin, U. (2012) Framing Cultures of Spatial Planning, Planning Practice and Research, 27(1): 63-85. 
  • Othengrafen, F. (2014) The Concept of Planning Culture: Analysing How Planners Construct Practical Judgements in a Culturised Context, International Journal of E-Planning Research, 3(2). 
  • Sanyal, B. ed. (2005) Comparative Planning Cultures, New York, Routledge. Introduction chapter available online: http://web.mit.edu/sanyal/www/articles/ComparativePlanningCultures.pdf  
  • Stead, D. and Nadin, V. (2010) Planning cultures between models of society and planning systems, in Othengraften, F. and Knieling, J. (eds) Planning Cultures in Europe: Diversity and Convergence. Farnham: Ashgate, 283-300.
BENVGPL7 Dissertation in Planning (60 credits)

To complete an MSc in the Bartlett School of Planning, students are required to prepare and submit a Dissertation of 10,000 words (excluding title pages, tables of contents and figures, acknowledgements, abstracts, diagrams, figures, tables, references, headings, sub-headings, footnotes, endnotes and bibliography) on a subject approved by an allocated personal supervisor. Including the title page, tables of contents and figures, acknowledgements, abstracts, diagrams, figures, tables, references, headings, sub-headings, footnotes, endnotes and bibliography), the word count must not exceed 12,500 words.

This means that the dissertation must comprise no more than 12,500 words from its cover page to the end of its bibliography (or endnotes). Also, no more than 5,000 words may be included in appendices. Students will be asked to confirm that these limits have not been exceeded.

The dissertation develops students’ research skills and abilities and allows students to explore – in depth – a particular and usually complex area covered in their MSc core or specialist teaching. The dissertation represents a study of a specified topic based on the gathering and analysis of primary and/or secondary data and on a review of the literature.

The student therefore should demonstrate abilities in research topic design, execution and presentation and a capacity for in-depth critical thinking in their chosen area of study. This is the culmination of the Masters programme, the student's chance to synthesise, in a major and largely self-managed study, what he or she has gained from the course and, often, to integrate it with elements from previous studies or professional experiences. The dissertation is something you can take with you, use to demonstrate your expertise and launch the next stage of your career.

This document is generic, across a number of masters’ programmes, but also highlights specific issues for MSc Spatial Planning and MSc International Planning students.

Aims & Outcomes

Dissertations are STUDENT-DRIVEN EXERCISES that should draw from and allow students to reflect on the range of subject-matter covered in the taught modules.

Students will be allocated a Personal Supervisor. The role of the Supervisor is to

1. Agree an appropriate topic with the student

2. Agree a structure for the dissertation, research objectives, a suitable research methodology and assist in building a bibliography

3. Comment on a full and complete draft of the dissertation before submission (with the date of submission and feedback agreed with the supervisor in advance)

4. Mark the dissertation when completed (all dissertations will be independently second marked and subject to External examiners' judgments).

Students should plan to meet with their supervisor on NO MORE THAN THREE OCCASIONS. These meetings should focus on items one and two above, and to get feedback following item three. Responsibility for arranging these meetings lies with the student.

The purpose of undertaking an in-depth dissertation is as follows: To enable the student to apply the knowledge and skills acquired from their broader programme to a detailed investigation of a relevant topic, thereby demonstrating an ability to apply theory to the analysis of a topic, and demonstrating an ability to design and execute an appropriate programme of research. The Dissertation should demonstrate the ability to:

1. Identify a topic for original research

2. Establish and address clearly focused and fundamental research questions

3. Critically analyse relevant theory and literature

4. Supplement the review by gathering and analysing relevant primary and/or secondary research data and information as appropriate

5. Write clearly and concisely in a manner that logically presents evidence and draws clear research conclusions and insights

Structure/Outline

Two hard copies of the dissertation should be submitted, neither of which will be returned to students. Dissertations should be either hard-bound or spiral-bound. An electronic copy must also be submitted via Moodle. The deadline for both forms of submission is 5pm on 1st September or on the Monday AFTER if the 1st falls on a Saturday, a Sunday or a Bank Holiday.

The dissertation should be word processed on good quality A4 paper, on one side of the paper only, in one-and-a-half spaced text with generous margins at head, foot and left- and right-hand margins. The pages should be numbered consecutively.

The dissertation will normally contain:

1. a word count (for the main body and for appendices)

2. an abstract of not more than 300 words (included in the word count for the main body)

3. an introduction setting out the approach and the questions or issues to be explored or alternatively the hypothesis to be tested

4. a conceptual/theoretical context and thorough literature review of the work already done in the particular field

5. an explanation of research design and methods

6. a presentation and analysis of the research material

7. conclusions and relevant recommendations

8. a bibliography

9. appendices briefly presenting any primary data/information gathered (not to exceed 5,000 words).

Within this structure, students are advised to check that the key ingredients noted in the assesment criteria can be identified.

The first page of the dissertation should have as its heading the following:

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

FACULTY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

BARTLETT SCHOOL OF PLANNING

and be followed by the title of the Dissertation and the author's name (including qualifications). At the foot of the page should be a declaration as follows:

Being a Dissertation submitted to the faculty of The Built Environment as part of the requirements for the award of the MSc [NAME OF MSC] at University College London:

I declare that this Dissertation is entirely my own work and that ideas, data and images, as well as direct quotations, drawn from elsewhere are identified and referenced.

(signature)

(date)

There should then follow an Acknowledgement page, indicating any intellectual or practical help received in the execution of the dissertation (it is not appropriate to include a dedication). Where the dissertation is based partly on experience in a work placement or professional job, you should include a detailed statement (additional to the declaration on the title page) explaining which parts of the material represent your own personal work and which parts draw on contributions by colleagues. Your supervisor should be consulted about this statement. There should then follow, on a separate page, a list of contents, together with a list of figures, tables, diagrams, illustrations, photographs etc., with the appropriate pagination.

Care should be taken to ensure all maps, diagrams etc. are fully titled and numbered, and cross-referenced to the relevant part of the text. It is inadvisable to overburden the text with an undue weight of illustrative material, which often can more appropriately be located in appendices at the end of the text. On the other hand, modern software enables tables and images to be placed where they contribute to the narrative and can often be used to economise on words.

An abstract of not more than 300 words should follow the contents on a separate sheet. This is an essential requirement for examination purposes. An abstract is a concise summary of the dissertation and not an introduction.

The dissertation should be clearly divided into chapters, with appropriate use of headings and sub-headings. Attention should be given to the format and presentation of maps, diagrams, tables, illustrations etc. Maps should be scaled and presented in a consistent format.

Citations in the text should follow a variant of the Harvard Style(Abercrombie, 1944: 75) and the bibliography should include all cited works. References to web sources should include the complete URL of the actual page(s) cited and the date when the page was viewed.

Note: special care should be taken to proof-read and edit the final typescript before it is bound, to correct typographical and other mistakes. Dissertations which contain an unwarranted number of such presentational errors will not be accepted for examination, or may be sent back for correction by examiners.

Suggested format of a Dissertation Proposal

Once you have agreed a topic with your supervisor, you are advised to produce a full proposal on which your supervisor can offer advice. This proposal then becomes your plan for producing c dissertation by the deadline. A proposal will typically have the following elements:

Statement of context: identify a planning problem in which a key question you want to ask is located. For example, questions over the supply of affordable housing are located within a wider debate over housing supply and demand, and the strength of local economies / wage levels. Debates over the formulation and use of action planning are located within a wider context of planning reform, and a debate surrounding local versus central planning. The statement of context should identify your broad area of concern, from which a key question emerges;

A timetable. You may have 4 months to complete the dissertation (or longer if you’re studying part-time), so draw out a time line and indicate when different stages will be completed. The stages can simply be completion of the aims – reaching the milestones on the way to meeting your overall objective and finishing the dissertation.

 

Objective Approach

A Systematic Literature Review (Part 1)

B Systematic Literature Review (Part 2)

C Conceptualise Key Tensions / Barriers

D Undertake Structured Survey (Postal)

E Statistical analysis (SPSS) / Selection Process

F Conduct Interviews with Key Stakeholders

G Integrated analysis of Patterns and Processes

H Draw Conclusions

A Statement of methodology relating to your objectives: A key question or aim, which can be broken down into objectives. Think of it like this: the aim is what you want to achieve; the objectives are the steps you need to take to achieve that aim.

Hence, if your aim is to address a question: how can the planning system be used to deliver a greater contribution of affordable housing in rural areas, then your objectives might be: (a) Review literature on planning gain and the changing role of planning obligations; (b) Review literature on the use of planning to procure affordable housing, focusing on ‘rural’ mechanisms; (c) Develop and understanding of the apparent tensions / barriers; (d) Design a questionnaire and undertake a survey within a single English region; (e) Analyse results and select case studies on basis of results; (f) Interview key stakeholders in two case studies; (g) Undertaken analysis of patterns of success / failure (survey) and processes underpinning patterns (interviews); (h) Draw conclusions and address key aim / question; A brief ‘review’ of literature, establishing which information sources are relevant to your chosen topic: books, journal articles, web sites, datasets etc. This will not be a critical review, but an indication that data is available and you are aware of the broadly relevant sources.

Staff

The supervisor will be allocated following a meeting with your Programme Director in the term 3 to formally introduce the dissertation module.

Assessment

Coursework: 100% 

Written examination: 0%

Assessment Timetable

It is the student’s responsibility to establish a detailed timetable for their work, but the following can be taken as guidance:

Allocation of Supervisors

 

Following meeting to formally introduce the Dissertation (with the programme directors).

Agree topic with Supervisor

 

As soon as possible, after the allocation of a supervisor.

Attend Planning Research module

 

Usually during term 3, but check appropriate timetable for details.

Agree structure, objectives and methodology with Supervisor

 

Set these out in an dissertation proposal which will be reviewed and commented upon by your supervisor. The form of a proposal is suggested at the end of this document.

Agree data collection strategy

 

Usually before the end of Term 3 for FT students; later for those studying PT.
Submit full draft for comment

Students need to submit a full draft for comment before their final submission. A date for this must be agreed with their supervisor. This must be a minimum of 2 weeks before the submission date.

 

Final submission

1st September, or on the Monday AFTER if the 1st falls on a Saturday, a Sunday or a Bank Holiday

 

The date of the final submission is absolute. Marks may also be deducted for Dissertations exceeding the word limit set out at the beginning of this document and/or that are poorly written or presented.

Criteria for assessment(s):

Dissertations will be assessed on the degree to which they meet the educational aims above, and the research objectives established by the student. Students should also be aware of the key ingredients of dissertations, which have now been incorporated into the marking scheme for this module:

THE KEY INGREDIENTS OF A DISSERTATION

1. A brief abstract and introduction that clearly specifies the focus of the dissertation and the problem it seeks to address

2. A grounding of the problem in a critical reading of existing literature in the field (previous studies, analyses and critiques) and policy review (the policy context itself and critiques of policy) as appropriate The literature review will play a part in conceptual development (4) and may, of itself, be part of the operationalisation of objectives

3. A well-formulated critical question or a hypothesis that seeks understanding of a process or aims to explain outcomes

4. And, linking to (2) and (3), formulation of the critical question from a conceptualisation of the problem / process to be addressed

5. The logical division of this question or hypothesis into a set of clear objectives which build upon each other in a logical way, to form a robust programme of research

6. A clearly defined methodology that shows firstly how the objectives of the research will be met and secondly is tailored to answering the dissertation's critical question or testing it's hypothesis (ideally, the methodology should mimic the logic of the objectives, showing how each will be operationalised)

7. The collection of data (qualitative or qualitative) that is clearly appropriate to the problem using robust data collection techniques, the choice of which must be clearly justified;

8. Appropriate analysis of the data, integrated across different data sources as required. Data should be appropriately displayed, scrutinised and critiqued so that a reasoned set of conclusions can be drawn

9. Rigorous and reflective interpretation of the data

10. A concluding section or chapter that brings together reflections of the review of existing work in the field with the new findings, demonstrating how the research has contributed to understanding of the topic, probably by revisiting the original conceptualisation. As appropriate, the concluding section should also reflect on i) the broader but reasoned conclusions (for planning, urban regeneration, design and so forth) that can be drawn from this focused empirical study, ii) policy or practice implications iii) any shortcoming or failings of the project and iv) further questions arising from the research

11. The dissertation should be logically structured and well written. It should demonstrate intellectual achievement. The very best dissertations will offer a degree of originality in their analysis of a topic and may display innovation in the way they approach a subject or collect data

12. It will be well-presented in terms of layout

13. It will be fully referenced throughout, always in Harvard style.

Note: take great care to read the statement on plagiarism in the Programme Handbook.

Indicative reading

Reading will focus on the chosen research topic, but should also draw from across the programme of study. For detailed advice on the execution of the dissertation, the following will be found useful, as it covers preparation of a research task, data gathering and analysis, and report and presentation of results: Howard K. & Sharp, J. A. (1983) Management of a Student Research Project, London, Gower. This is a good general guide, but there are also newer texts which can be found by entering 'dissertation writing' in Google Books.

BENVGPL9 Critical Debates In International Planning

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module combines a series of lectures and small group seminars. The lectures cover key and emergent topics in international planning and urban studies, followed up by small-group seminar discussions based around targeted readings. The active small-group seminar discussion is an important part of this module.

The aim is to enable students to develop a deeper knowledge of forms, practices and theories of planning, and to develop an integrated view of planning in relation to its key areas of knowledge production and circulation.

The module is divided into 5 lectures and 5 small group seminars, in alternating weeks, covering five topics. The overall aim is to expose students to a range of planning debates rather than comprehensively and consistently covering the field.

Lectures will introduce key themes and debates but the seminar readings will challenge students to critically engage with conceptual framings and case studies of the phenomena, trends or issues introduced in the lecture. Each student must come prepared for the seminar with a preparatory note, using the template provided. These notes will be assessed.

Moodle

Because the arrangement of this module is unusually complex, Moodle will be heavily used. Students will find the timetable, the module outline, the seminar questions and most of reading materials in Moodle.


Aims and Outcomes

The module aims at providing students with opportunities to understand the current topics in international planning, develop in-depth reading skills and critical reflection, building and expanding on some of the themes explored in GPL6 (Comparative Planning Systems and Cultures). The discussion is based around key themes in international planning and urban studies. The reading materials are structured around key themes raised in the lectures as well as other core modules in the International Planning programme. The learning outcomes include:

  • Getting familiar with the current literature on key issues in international planning;
  • Developing critical thinking towards an established theory; 
  • Developing the skills to summarise and discuss key points from a complex argument
  • Developing critical argument-making skills through engagement with theoretical and practical debates, as applied to real international contexts. 

Structure/Outline

Week 1Circulation of planning knowledge and practice (Lecture)    
Week 2Circulation of planning knowledge and practice (Seminar)
Week 3Ordinary cities and informality (Lecture)    
Week 4Slums and informality (Seminar)
Week 5Sprawl city: the new urbanity (Lecture)    
 Reading week
Week 6Suburbanization and suburbanism (Seminar)
Week 7World Cities and urban mega projects (Lecture)    
Week 8Urban mega projects (Seminar)
Week 9Ethics of global professional practice (Lecture)    
Week 10Reflective practitioner (Seminar)

Staff

Dr. Fangzhu Zhang
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with

Professor Fulong Wu
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Dr Susan Moore
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Professor Nick Phelps
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Assessment

Coursework: 100%

  • seminars  (30%)
  • essay (70%)

Description of assessment(s)

The assessments of this module consist of two parts: seminar and final essay. Students will be asked to present a critical synopsis of the literature and to discuss it in each seminar. At the end of the course each student should write an essay. More information is in the module outline.

1) Seminar (5 x 6%= 30%) 

Each seminar accounts for 6% of overall module mark. In each seminar assessment, 60% of the mark will be based on the preparatory note and 40% on active seminar participation. 

2) Final Essay (70%)

Indicative Reading

See Moodle page for this module

BENVGPLC Urban Design: Place Making

Provide students with an introductory yet comprehensive overview of urban design theory and provides an opportunity to turn urban design theory into practice through the completion of an urban design project

Teaching and Learning Methods

Knowledge is imparted through a lecture course and developed through individual and group project work. The course includes attendance at a series of tutorials and reviews.

Aims & Outcomes

The course aims to provide students with an introductory yet comprehensive overview of urban design theory. It also provides an opportunity to turn urban design theory into practice through the completion of one project in three parts.

The first - quick-fire - element is concerned with releasing your innate creativity. The second is concerned with a complimentary but very different set of skills - your analytical skills. A third part brings these two critical dimensions of urban design practice together as a means to understand and propose creative place-making solutions in a complex urban context.

The course illustrates the potential of design as a creative problem solving process, a process necessary to deliver the types of public and private investments in the built environment that will continue to return value to their users and investors over the long-term.

In achieving this, the course provides a basic grounding for the exploration of urban design issues in greater depth through the Urban Design Specialism. It also provides a stepping off point for thinking creatively about planning at a larger spatial scale, for more detailed discussions about sustainable urban design and for preparing and implementing regeneration projects.

Structure/Outline

Built environment professionals should have a clear understanding of how their various interventions combine together to potentially create high quality, sustainable, people friendly, vital and viable environments; or conversely, poor quality, alienating, or simply unsustainable environments.

As all significant built environment interventions inevitably have an impact on the quality of the physical environment and how it is used and experienced, it is important that an appreciation of that impact is developed.

Urban design as a discipline has been the subject of much recent attention and has secured its place in the interstice between the other established built environment professions. In this position urban design is a policy and practice based subject, which, like its related disciplines of architecture and planning, benefits from an extensive and legitimising theoretical underpinning.

In this respect the theory of urban design is a subject with ancient roots and yet also a subject which in modern times has developed quickly and continues to evolve.

This course draws on the extensive theoretical underpinning of urban design as a means to explore approaches to appraise the character of the built environment, and, as a result, to forward practical and even visionary proposals aimed at beneficially influencing the quality and liveability of urban space as a key contribution to sustainable place making.

Staff

Professor Matthew Carmona
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Assessment

Assessment is by the submission of one project in three parts.

Indicative Reading

  • Carmona M, Tiesdell S, Heath T and Oc T (2010) Public Places - Urban Spaces, The Dimensions of Urban Design (Second Edition), Oxford, Architectural Press
  • Carmona M & Tiesdell S [Eds] (2007) Urban Design Reader, Oxford, Architectural Press
BENVGPLD From Strategic vision to Urban Plan

Neighbourhood planning is one of the key innovations brought forward by the reform of the UK planning systems. It seeks to allow local communities to make decisions about the future development of their area by establishing Neighbourhood Forums and developing Neighbourood Plans. In London Neighbourhood Forums faces a key challenge: the development of technical expertise and evidence base required to prepare plans that can successfully negotiate local needs with the strategic dimension of London’s planning. 

In the context of this “planning revolution”, the module gives the students the opportunity to experience what it means to be a planner in a live context. In groups, students will work collaboratively with existing London’s neighbourhood forums and use planning and spatial knowledge to support their progress towards the creation of a neighbourhood plan.  

Student coursework

In groups, students will prepare a coherent, structured and visually engaging report. The specific scope and content of each report are agreed with the neighbourhood forum at the start of the module and these will vary for each group. The module also offers an opportunity to disseminate students' work to community and government organisations, local authorities and professionals.

View a selection of reports produced by students in the 2014-2015 academic year.

Read about the 2015 Neighbourhood Planning Workshop

Teaching and Learning Methods:

This is a project-based module and is taught through a combination of lectures and weekly project meetings where students work in teams under the supervision of the module coordinator and a designated Tutor. 

Given the participatory nature of the module, students will be required to ensure that they actively engage and liaise with the participating neighbourhood forum. It is estimated that the students will meet with their allocated forum on at least three occasions during the module. A dedicated tutor with experience in community organisation and relationships, will be available to facilitate this process. 

Students are also expected to develop an in-depth knowledge of the neighbourhood area through independent site visits. 

Aims

The module aims to provide students with the competence, confidence and skills required to develop urban plans and spatial knowledge which critically engage with planning as a peopled, political and technical process. 

The module provides an opportunity for students to use previous knowledge and knowledge acquired in other modules and apply creative problem-solving and critical thinking to the development of an actual urban plan that can influence the future of a London's area. 

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module students will have:

  • Defined how urban plans contribute to spatial, social and economic change;
  • Applied survey and urban analysis methods to describe and explain the urban context;
  • Critically interpreted and responded to a brief and met its essential requirements;
  • Made and communicated decisions about complex and politically sensitive urban problems;
  • Researched and summarised urban plans and policy;
  • Selected and used graphic tools (diagrams and maps) to communicate information and ideas;
  • Orally and visually presented complex information in a clear and concise manner to a diversity of audiences.

Structure/Outline

All guest lectures are to be confirmed.

Week 1
Launch of the module and social event with representatives of the selected Neighbourhood Forums

Week 2
Project meetings + Guest Lecture: community mapping and citizen's science

Week 3
Project meetings 

Week 4
Project meetings + Guest Lecture: what is and how to understand a local economy?

Week 5
Project meetings

Week 6    
Reading week. No class

Week 7
Project meetings + Guest Lecture: writing policies and preparing evidence for neighbourhood plans

Week 8
Project meetings

Week 9
Project meetings

Week 10    
Project meetings

Week 11
Submission of group projects + class debate on themes for individual critique

Staff

Elena Besussi
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

100% coursework.

Assessment for this module is by submission of one project undertaken and assessed in groups (80% of the total module grade) and an individual critical essay (20%).

Criteria for assessment(s)

Assessment criteria for the group project (80% of module mark)
  • coherence and relevance of content;
  • clarity and legibility of information.
  • In groups, students will prepare a coherent, structured and visually engaging report (max 5000 words). The specific scope and content of each report are agreed with the neighbourhood forum at the start of the module and these will vary for each group.

The report is likely to include a combination of survey, urban analysis, policy analysis and proposal and must clearly demonstrate that it responds to the brief.

Assessment criteria for the individual critique (20% of module mark)
  • structure and critical reflection;
  • evidence of engagement with current planning debates.

Drawing information and inspiration from the work in the group project, each student will submit an individual critique / essay (max 700 words) discussing one of the following two themes:

  • Opportunities and challenges in linking London’s strategic social and economic dimensions with the needs and aspirations of a local neighbourhood.
  • Which practical and conceptual tools are needed for planners to support community participation and action in planning and urban development?

Deadlines and mode of submission

Group project submission: last Tuesday of term 2, by 12pm. 1 hard copy submitted to the Planning Office and 1 digital copy submitted via Moodle

Individual critique: First Monday of term 3, by 5pm, via Moodle only.

Feedback

Formative feedback

During the term students will receive formative feedback in the weekly tutorials where self and peer assessment is encouraged through oral discussion. 

Students are strongly encouraged to discuss with their tutor(s) the preparation of each coursework.  Students should seek guidance from their tutor in each tutorial. Outside tutorials students can reach their tutor(s) or the module coordinator via email correspondence (preferably via Moodle).

Summative feedback

The marking sheets with the detailed feedback for the group project will be returned 3 weeks after submission.

The marking sheets with the detailed feedback for the individual critique will be returned 4 weeks after submission.

All marks are subject to confirmation by the relevant MSc Exam Board.

Indicative Reading

BENVGPLE Planning for Housing: Process

This module is the first part of a two-part specialism looking at planning for housing in the UK. It is lecture based and examines the responses to housing demand pressures. It is followed by a project-based module which deals with a housing scheme within a live planning policy context.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module comprises ten two-hour classes.  Each class comprises a pair of 45 minute lecture, with a break in between - for questions or refreshments.

Aims

This module examines the context for and processes of residential development in the UK.  It begins by examining the drivers of residential development including the demographics of growth.  It looks at who provides housing and at the evolution of the UK policy context and its current objectives.  The module also explores residential development processes from strategic and development planning, land acquisition to planning for the infrastructure associated with housing growth.  The module is divided into three main parts:

  • Part 1: Perspectives on Housing Policy and Planning;
  • Part 2: Providers, Processes and Delivery;
  • Part 3: Critical Debates and Outcomes.

Learning Outcomes

The module aims to provide an understanding of the processes of planning for housing at both a strategic and developmental level.  It deals with drivers, with context and with outcomes.

Structure / Outline

Week 1    
General introduction: scope of specialism; drivers and shapers of housing development

Part 1: Perspectives on Housing Policy and Planning

Week 2    
Historical debates and perspectives; housing debate in recent years and months

Week 3    
Regional planning and growth projections / development planning and politics

Part 2: Providers, Processes and Delivery

Week 4    
Housing providers and perspectives on the development process

Week 5    
Allocating land for housing and site appraisal

Week 6    
General development finance and affordable housing

Week 7    
Housing construction and design: sustainability, space and utility

Week 8    
Growth, housing and infrastructure

Part 3: Critical Debates and Outcomes

Week 9

The evolving politics and realities of urban and rural housing development

Week 10    
The trajectory of planning reform in England in 2011/12

Professor Nick Gallent
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Assessment

Coursework: 100% Written examination: 0%

(i) Description of assessment

A single essay of 2500 words.

(ii) Criteria for assessment(s)

General assessment criteria include '[...]Knowledge of subject matter; marshalling arguments; evaluation of evidence; any special criteria outlined in brief. Up to 20% of marks can be deducted for incorrect presentation of bibliography, poor grammar or style, poor spelling or punctuation and value-laden language'.

More particularly, I will be looking for substantial evidence of further reading. There is a rich literature on housing development and planning. Marks will be awarded for evidence of critical engagement with key debates

(iii) Deadlines and modes of submission

Submission of essay, on Thursday of the 1st week of Term 2 - through Moodle.

The essay will be set on the first Thursday after Reading Week in Term 1.

(iv) Feedback

Tutors are there to support students.  I am very happy to discuss assignments with students one-to-one.  For BENVGPLE, I will set a wide range of potential essay topics.  I will spend at least half an hour in class going through each essay and will say something about structure and potential reading for the topic.

It is inevitable that you will have questions about the assignment, either before you begin or in the early stages of preparation.  There will always be an opportunity to discuss the assignment with me at the end of the scheduled classes, via email, or by making an appointment to see me. 

I will normally be able to comment on structure, answer questions about a topic, suggest further reading or suggest the names of authors who've written on a topic.  However, I don't know everything about everything and cannot do your literature searching for you. But I am here to help in any way I can.

Indicative Reading

Course Texts

  • Carmona, M, Carmona, S. and Gallent, N. (2003) Delivering New Homes: Processes, Planners and Providers, Routledge: London
  • Gallent, N. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2007) Decent Homes for All: Reviewing Planningís Role in Housing Provision, Routledge: London
  • Golland, A. and Blake, R. (Eds) Housing Development: Theory, Process and Practice, Routledge: London

Recent Policy Documents

  • Conservative Party (2010) Open Source Planning: The Conservative Planning Green Paper, Conservative Party: London
  • DCLG (2006a) Planning Policy Statement 3: Housing, DCLG: London
  • DCLG (2006b) New Growth Points ñ Partnership for Growth with Government, DCLG: London
  • DCLG (2007a) Homes for the Future: More Affordable, More Sustainable, DLCG: London
  • DCLG (2007b) Eco-towns Prospectus, DCLG: London
  • DCLG (2007c) Delivering Affordable Housing, DCLG: London
  • HM Government (2011) Laying the Foundations: A Housing Strategy for England, TSO: Lon don
  • HM Treasury (2004) Review of Housing Supply: Delivering Stability - Securing Our Future Housing Needs, HM Treasury: London
  • DCLG (2012) National Planning Policy Framework, DCLG: London
  • DCLG (2011) Presumption in Favour of Sustainable Development 
  • DCLG (2011) A Plain English Guide to the Localism Act, DCLG: London
  • ODPM (2003) Sustainable Communities: Building for the Future, ODPM: London
  • ODPM (2005) Planning for Housing Provision ñ Consultation Paper, ODPM: London

The DCLG website has many other recent and older policy documents.  Of particular importance now is the National Planning Policy page.

The TCPA webpage also has a number of useful commentaries on recent government announcements and policy documents.

General Reading

  • Adams, D. and Watkins, C. (2002) Greenfields, Brownfields and Housing Development, Blackwell Publishing: London
  • Evans, A.W. (1991) ëRabbit hutches on postage stampsí: planning, development and political economy, in Urban Studies, 28, 6, pp. 853-870
  • Gallent, N. (2005), Regional Housing Figures in England: Policy, Politics and Ownership, Housing Studies, 20, 6, pp.973-988
  • Gallent, N. and Robinson, S. (2012) Neighbourhood Planning, Policy Press: Bristol
  • Satsangi, M., Gallent, N., Bevan, M. (2010) The Rural Housing Question: Communities and Planning in Britain's Countrysides, The Policy Press: Bristol
  • Shucksmith, M (1990) Housebuilding in Britain's Countryside, Routledge: London
  • Wellings, F. (2006) British Housebuilders: History and Analysis, Blackwell Publishing: London

I will list other key reading in lectures, and will also print some off (depending on student numbers) or circulate electronically.

Journal Articles

Articles on housing and planning are published in most major geography and planning journals. Using Google Scholar, you should be able to locate a good selection of articles on all the topics dealt with in this module.  Because of the college's electronic subscriptions, you will be able to download most of these articles in PDF.

The Bartlett Library also holds many hard copies of journals including Town and Country Planning which provides many useful summaries of topics in this wider field.

BENVGPLF Planning for Housing: Project

This module takes a project-based learning approach and builds upon the conceptual and policy-orientated foundation of its prerequisite module BENVGPLE ‘Planning for Housing: Process’.

It challenges students to apply and extend their knowledge of development actors, practices and constraints to real-life development opportunities in Greater London. Via small group organisation, students will coordinate the completion of a comprehensive feasibility study for a housing site. Each group will produce a Vision Document for the scheme. 

Aims

The aim of the module is to provide students with: 

1. Working knowledge of current policy and regulation affecting housing development processes and actors and an awareness of recent (and future) shifts which affect the production of housing, from multiple stakeholder perspectives 

2. Ability to generate, pose, define and prioritise problems and constraints imposed by changing state-market relations and cultural conditions in the delivery of housing within the UK (and specifically London) 

3. Experience of assembling, coordinating and participating in a ‘project team’; a transferable skill to the workplace 

4. Ability to produce high-quality professional standard reports, briefs, plans and presentations  

5. Enhancement of critical skills in peer and self-assessment and responsiveness to constructive feedback, in order to encourage professional development as a reflective practitioner 

Structure/Outline

This module is taught over ten 3-hour sessions, comprising a mix of lectures, guest speaker seminars, group workshops and tutorials, site visits, student presentations and panel discussions. Each session (unless not at UCL) will incorporate time for self-directed group work and group discussion with tutors. Successful completion of the project will require additional group meetings beyond the timetabled sessions.

Staff

Dr Susan Moore
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Sonia Friere Trigo
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Elanor Warwick
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Lesley Johnson
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Dr Tommaso Gabrieli
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Dr Duncan Bowie 
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Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework-based. Four elements make up the assessment grade: 

1. Project Management (2 work plans and 2 progress reports) 15%  

2. Case Study Profile 15% 

3. Presentation 10% 

4. Vision Document (with statements of individual contributions) 60% 

A detailed description of the assignment will be distributed in the first session of the module and the criteria for assessment will be fully explained and discussed. Self and peer-assessment factors will be used to produce an individual mark for each group member using an online inter-rater consistency approach. This process will be fully explained to students during the first session.   

Indicative Reading

  • Adams, D and Tiesdell, S (2013) Shaping Places: Urban Planning, design and Development  London: Routledge  
  • Adams, D. and Watkins, (2002) Greenfields, Brownfields and Housing Development, Blackwell Publishing, London 
  • Ball, M. (2010) The House Building Industry: Promoting Recovery in Housing Supply, A Report for the Department of Communities and Local Government, April, 2010.  
  • Biddulph, M. (2006) Introduction to Residential Layout, Oxford, Butterworth-Heinemann.  
  • Bowie, D (2010) Politics, planning and Homes in a World City, Routledge, London 
  • CABE (2008)  Affordable Housing Survey : A review of the quality of affordable housing in England  London : HCA  
  • Cadman, D. and Topping, R. (1995) Property Development, E&FN Spon, London 
  • Carmona, M., Carmona, S. and Gallent, N. (2003) Delivering New Homes, Routledge, London 
  • Coleman , C., Crosby, N., McAllister, P. and Wyatt, P. (2013) Development appraisal in practice: some evidence from the planning system, Journal of Property Research, 30:2, 144-165, 
  • Clapham D. (2005) The Meaning of Housing: A pathways approach. Bristol, The Policy Press. 
  • Fainstein, S. (2001) The city builders. 2nd ed., Oxford: Blackwell.  
  • Firley, E. and Stahl, C. (2009) The Urban Housing Handbook, Wiley. 
  • Franklin, B. (2006) Housing Transformations (Housing and Society Series). London, Routledge. 
  • Gallent, N. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2007) Decent Homes for All, London, Routledge. 
  • Gibb, K., Munro, M and Satsangi, M. (1999) Housing Finance in the UK: an introduction, 2nd Edition. London, MacMillan. 
  • Golland, A. and Blake, R. (2004) Housing Development: Theory, Process and Practice, London, Routledge. 
  • Goodchild, B. (2008) Homes, Cities and Neighbourhoods: Planning and the Residential Landscapes of Modern Britain, Ashgate.  
  • Guy S. and Henneberry J. (eds.) (2002) Development and Developers: Perspectives on Property, Oxford: Blackwell  
  • Havard, T. (2009) Contemporary Property Development  
  • Havard, T. (2014) Financial Feasibility Studies for Property Development: Theory and Practice  Housing Act 2004
  • Localism Act 2011  
  • Jaggar, D., A. Ross, J.P. Love (2002) Building Design Cost Management 
  • Kirkham, R. (2007) Ferry and Brandon’s Cost Planning of Buildings, Oxford, Blackwell. 
  • Levitt. D (2010) The Housing Design Handbook: A Guide to Good Practice, London: Routledge 
  • Lund, Brian. (2006). Understanding Housing Policy.  Bristol, The Policy Press. 
  • Malpass, P. and A. Murie (1999) Housing Policy and Practice, London, MacMillan 
  • Miles, M., Berens, G. and Weiss, M. (2003) Real Estate Development: Principles and Process, ULI, Chicago.  
  • Mullins, D. and A. Murie (2006) Housing Policy in the UK, Basingstoke, Palgrave MacMillan. 
  • Prince’s Foundation (2014) Housing London: A mid rise solution   
  • Peiser, R. and Frej, A. (2003) Professional real estate development: the ULI guide to the business, the Urban Land Institute: Washington DC.  
  • Ratcliffe, J., & Stubbs, M. (2013). Urban planning and real estate development. Routledge. 
  • Ratcliffe, J., Stubbs, M. and Keeping, M. (2009) Urban Planning and Real Estate Development, London, Routledge. 
  • Smith, J. and D. Jaggar (2006) Building Cost Planning for the Design Team, Oxford, Butterworth-Heinemann. 
  • Urban Design London  (2012) A new London Housing Vernacular    
  • Wellings, F. (2006) British Housebuilders, London, Blackwell Publishing. 
  • Wilkinson, S. and R. Reed (2008) Property Development, 5th Edition, London, Routledge. 
BENVGPLG International Planning Project

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is composed of 10 sessions and an international field trip. Teaching methods include a small number of lectures; weekly tutorials to support students in the development and preparation of the group project; and an international field trip in the Reading Week of Term 2. 

Aims

This module builds upon the core modules of the MSc (in particular Space and Place A, Pillars of Planning and International Planning) and encourages students to integrate and apply the analytical skills and knowledge gained in other modules to a strategic planning exercise in an international (i.e. non-UK based) context. The case-study site will be located in the destination city of the international field trip which will take place in Reading Week of Term 2.

Learning Outcomes

Students will learn how to prepare a spatial concept plan for a large site to deliver a vision for the site in its larger spatial context (i.e. the city-regional context) informed by the outcomes of thematic analyses.

Structure/Outline

Week 1 to 5First half of Term 2: weekly lectures and tutorials to help students develop the thematic analyses of the urban context for the strategic site.
Reading WeekField trip to the case-study city + site observation.
Week 7-11Second half of Term 2: weekly tutorials to support students in the preparation of a spatial concept plan for the site. Final presentations + hand-in on the last week of Term 2.

Staff

Dr. Sonia Arbaci
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Juliana Martins
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Alexandra Gomes
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Assessment

The module is entirely assessed through an integrated project, which involves the preparation of a spatial concept plan for a strategic site in the case-study city.

Teams of 4-5 students - acting as planning consultants responding to a 'hypothetical' call for proposals by a local authority will

  • (i) undertake a thematic analysis of the city and the case-study site in its global, transnational, national and regional context to be presented to the other teams before the field trip; and 
  • (ii) after the field trip, prepare a strategy and a spatial concept plan for the case-study site informed by the results of the thematic analyses and by the observation done during the field trip.

Indicative reading

References and resources on the case-study city will be provided by the module coordinator.

BENVGPLH Spatial Planning: Critical Practice

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught through ten sessions, comprising lectures and small group seminars.  The four lecture sessions provide the overall structure of the module and some key ideas that relate to all topics.  

For each of the six discussion classes, students are provided with a set of readings, including practical and theoretically focused worked, which they are given two weeks to read and summarize in note form.  

Students then meet with a designated tutor for a session to debate the issues that emerge.  Finally, students select one of the six topics to write an in-depth essay on.  This is in addition to private reading (as directed by detailed reading lists relating to each session).

Aims & Outcomes

This module develops students’ understanding of key debates in planning, framed by a lens of issues and theories relevant to ‘planning practice’, primarily in the UK but with appropriate European and international comparisons.

The module builds on the understanding students will have of how planning works as a system gained from BENVGPL5 ‘Spatial Planning: Concepts and Context’ by offering insight into questions of actually doing planning, as a peopled process and develops students’ understanding of the key themes chosen through their reading, related class discussion, and the production of a final integrative text.  

Overall, students’ knowledge of the key themes relevant to spatial planning and planning practice is developed, as are critical thinking abilities.

The course aims are:

  • To provide students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, critical reflection and discussion around key planning themes and debates connected with planning practice
  • To develop students’ understanding of planning as a peopled process, and the meaning of being a ‘professional’
  • To develop students’ understanding of key questions, debates and dilemmas affecting the everyday practice of planning in the UK
  • To provide knowledge about what it means to be a ‘reflexive’ and ‘ethical’ practitioner
  • To enable students to develop a deeper knowledge of forms, practices and theories of planning, and to form an integrated view of planning in relation to its key areas of knowledge

Structure/Outline

Session 1 Lecture: Introducing the course and the idea of being a reflexive practitioner

Session 2 Seminar: How close is the relationship between political ideology and the planning system?

Session 3 Seminar: What is ‘sustainable development’ and how useful is it as a concept for planning?

Session 4 Seminar: What difference has devolution made to planning?

Session 5 Lecture: The relationship between planners and politicians

Session 6 Lecture: Planning as a system rooted in the law: the example of Judicial Review

Session 7 Seminar: Do we need a national spatial plan for England or for the United Kingdom?

Session 8 Seminar: Can we measure the contribution the statutory planning system makes?

Session 9 Seminar: Do we need third party rights of appeal in planning?

Session 10 Lecture: Being a ‘professional’ and questions of ethical practice

Staff

Dr Ben Clifford
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Mr Colin Haylock

Mr Ronan O’Connor

Ms Ann Skippers

Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

100% coursework, comprising 5% per seminar for preparation and participation, and 70% for one 2,000 word essay on any of the six seminar topics discussed.

Criteria for assessment(s)

In addition to the generic criteria for postgraduate assessment, the coursework will take the form of independent reading leading to seminar discussions and critical reflection. Students will submit an essay of 2,000 words answering one of the five questions set, within the context of readings from one or more of the seminars that the students have participated in.  

For the preparatory notes, students will need to evidence that they have read and critically engaged with all of the readings set.  For the seminar participation grade, students will need to actively participate in the discussions during the each class, in a meaningful way.  

For the essay, students will need to show evidence of an understanding of their chosen topic, the ability to contextualize within seminar themes and readings, as well as demonstrating that a logical argument is formed and debated with reference to case studies and literature.

Deadlines and mode of submission

Each note should be submitted at the start of the relevant seminar.  Feedback on the preparatory note and participation in the seminar will then be provided within a week.  The essay is due for submission by 5pm Monday 27th April 2015. Feedback can be expected within 4 weeks.

Feedback

Guidance and support available to students before the coursework is due (formative feedback):

Students are strongly encouraged to discuss with their tutor the preparation of the formal coursework essay before submission.  Tutors will set aside time during class for any general questions about essays and be available for specific queries via e-mail.  The module coordinator, Dr Ben Clifford, will also be available to discussion essay plans and answer individual queries in person during his office hours, and will remind students of these in the run-up to the essay deadline.

Summative feedback

The marking sheet with detailed feedback on the course essay will be returned within 20 working days (i.e. 4 weeks) via Moodle. 

Indicative Reading

There is no key readings per se, as the module is about detailed readings of specified papers which vary between seminars and depending on the themes selected, but the following book gives a good general sense of many (but not all) of the topics discussed:

  • Clifford, B.P. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2013).  The Collaborating Planner: Practitioners in the Neoliberal Age. Policy Press, Bristol
BENVGPLJ Communities and Planning: Concepts and Frameworks

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is lecture and seminar based

Aims & Outcomes

This module aims to introduce students to the concept and context of ‘public participation’ in planning. The module considers the history of participation in planning and local governance, and contextualises this though an exploration of related social and political concepts.  

These concepts and frameworks are considered in critical perspective in relation to planning’s accomplishments and limitations in participatory forms of practice.

On successful completion of the module each student will have:

  • Review how public participation is understood and used within planning theory and practice
  • In-depth knowledge of the history of participation in planning
  • Evaluation of the social concepts related to participation and engagement in planning, particularly community, class and difference
  • Ability to assess the political concepts related to participation and engagement in planning, particularly deliberation, power and democracy
  • Develop critical and theoretically informed understanding of the limitations of some participatory practices

Structure/Outline

Session 1

Introduction to the module

Defining participation

Notions of ‘interests’ in planning: public and private

Session 2

Theories of participation:  Can we transform power relations?

  • Resistance to urban renewal
  • Collaborative and communicative planning
  • Deliberative practice
Session 3

Sociological perspectives on public participation in planning (CC):

  • The usual suspects: who participates in formal public participation channels?
  • Class, social and cultural capital and resources in the participatory process

When people cannot/do not wish to engage in formal participatory processes: alternative forms of engagement with/in planning

Session 4

Social capital and deliberation 

  • Good governance
  • Social capital
  • Institutional capacity
Session 5

Planning in diverse societies (YB)

  • From assimilation to multiculturalism, diversity and difference
  • Reconciling different rationalities within planning frameworks

+ Student led seminar 

 Reading week
Session 7

Collaborative social processes 

  • Social learning concepts/ co-production
  • The politics of knowledge
  • Publics

+ Student led seminar

Session 8

Guest lecture – Kate Henderson

Integrating knowledge into planning deliberation

  • Complex decision-making and expert forms of knowledge
  • ‘The role of conflict within planning spheres  

+ Student led seminar

Session 9

History of participation in UK practice 

  • The traditions of representative democracy
  • The growth of direct engagement from Skeffington to Pickles
Session 10

Localism and neighbourhood planning 

  • Pluralism and Democratic Renewal
  • Evolving community-based planning in England
  • Neighbourhood Planning
Session 11

New challenges for participation

Staff

Dr. Yasminah Beebeejaun (module coordinator)
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Dr Ben Clifford
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Professor Yvonne Rydin
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Dr Claire Colomb
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Dr Lucy Natarajan 
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Professor Nick Gallent
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Coursework: 100%: 

Essay: 80% Seminar participation: 20%

 

Further details will be circulated in class.

Deadlines and mode of submission

Further details will be circulated in class.

 

Indicative Reading

  • Arnstein S, (1969) “A ladder of citizen participation” Journal of the American Institute of Planners 35(4) 216-224
  • Barton, H. (ed) (2000), 'Sustainable Communities: Potential for Eco-Neighbourhoods', London: Earthscan, Kant: 339.5 B195
  • Barnes, M., Newman, J., Knops, A. and Sullivan, H. (2003).  “Constituting ‘the Public’ in Public Participation”  Public Administration 81(2), pp 379-399.
  • Beebeejaun Y, Durose C, Rees J, Richardson J, Richardson L (2013) “Beyond text: Exploring ethos and method in co-producing research with communities” Community Development Journal Online First.
  • Beebeejaun, Y (2006)  "The participation trap: The limitations of participation for ethnic and racial groups." International Planning Studies 11(1) 3-18.
  • Chapman R, Lowndes V, 2009, “Accountable, authorised or authentic? What do faith representatives offer urban governance?” Public Money and Management 29(6) 371-378.
  • Clifford, B. P. (2013). Rendering reform: local authority planners and perceptions of public participation in Great Britain. Local Environment: the international journal of justice and sustainability, 18 (1), 110-13
  • Clifford, B.P. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2013).The Collaborating Planner? Practitioners in the Neoliberal Age. (Policy Press, Bristol).
  • Cooke B, Kothari U, 2001 Participation, the new tyranny? (ZED Books, London).
  • Defilippis, J. (2004) Unmaking Goliath: Community control in the face of global capital (London: Routledge).
  • DeFilippis, J., R. Fisher, and E. Shragge (2006) "Neither Romance Nor Regulation: Re‐evaluating Community." International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 30.3: 673-689.
  • DeFilippis, J. and Saegert, S. (2013) Community Development. (London: Routledge).
  • Fischer F. (2000) Citizens, Experts, and the Environment: The Politics of Local Knowledge (Durham NC: Duke University Press)
  • Freire P. (1970) Pedagogy of the Oppressed (London: Continuum)
  • Gallent, N. (2007) "Second homes, community and a hierarchy of dwelling." Area 39.1: 97-106.
  • Harvey, D. (2000) Spaces of hope. (Berkeley: University of California Press)
  • Gallent, N., & Robinson, S. (2012). Neighbourhood Planning: Communities, Networks, Governance. (Bristol: Policy Press)
  • Gaventa J. (2005) Claiming Citizenship: Rights, Participation and Accountability (London:Zed Books)
  • Hajer M., Wagenaar H. (Eds.) (2003) Deliberative Policy Analysis. Understanding Governance in the Network Society. (Cambridge: Cambridge. University Press).
  • Healey, P. (2006). Collaborative Planning. (London: Palgrave).
  • Lawless P. (2011) “Understanding the scale and nature of outcome change in area-regeneration programmes: evidence from the New Deal for Communities programme in England” Environment and Planning C 29(3) 520-532
  • Maginn P, (2007) “Towards more effective representation: the potential of collaborative planning and applied ethnography” Qualitative Research  7(1) 25-43
  • Narayan D, with Patel R, Schafft, K, Rademacher A, Koch-Schulte S, (1999) Can Anyone Hear Us? Voices from 47 Countries The World Bank, Washington DC
  • Newman J, (2012) Working the Spaces of Power: Activism, Neoliberalism and Gendered Labour (London: Bloomsbury Academic Press)
  • Phillips A, (1995) The Politics of Presence (OxfordClarendon Press).
  • Pitkin H, (1967) The Concept of Representation (University of California, Berkeley)
  • Porter L, (2010) Unlearning the colonial cultures of planning  (Surrey: Ashgate)
  • Putman, R. (2000), ‘Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community’ (New York:Simon and Schuster)
  • Rydin, Y. (1999), ‘Public Participation in Planning’, in Cullingworth, B. (ed.), British Planning: 50 Years of Urban and Regional Policy, Athlone, London, pp. 184-197.
  • Rydin, Y. (2003). Urban and Environmental Planning in the UK.  (Palgrave, London)
  • Rydin, Y. (2013).  The Future of Planning.  (Bristol: Policy Press, Bristol)
  • Sandercock, L. (1998).  Towards Cosmopolis: Planning for Multicultural Cities. (London: Wiley and Sons).
  • Sanoff, H. (2000). Community Participation Methods in Design and Planning (New York, John Wiley and Sons)
  • Sarkissian, W., Hurford, D. & Wenman, C., 2010. Creative Community Planning - Transformative Engagement Methods for Working at the Edge, (London: Earthscan).
  • Schön, D. (1983) The Reflective Practitioner (New York: Basic Books)
  • Taylor, M. (2003), Public Policy in the Community, (Bristol: Policy Press).
  • Taylor M, 2007, “Community participation in the real world: Opportunities and pitfalls in new governance spaces” Urban Studies 44(2) 297-317.
  • Wates, Nick, ed (2000). The Community Planning Handbook:" How People Can Shape Their Cities, Towns and Villages in Any Part of the World". (London: Earthscan).
  • Wates, Nick, ed. (2008) The Community Planning Event Manual: How to use collaborative planning and urban design events to improve your environment. London: Earthscan).
  • Wilson, E. 1987. The Sphinx in the City (London: Virago Pres).
  • Young I, 1990 Justice and the Politics of Difference (Princeton NJ:Princeton University Press,)
  • Young I, 2000 Inclusion and Democracy (Oxford:Oxford University Press).
BENVGSU2 Critical Debate In Sustainable Urbanism

This module provides an opportunity for close engagement with a selection of readings on the topic of sustainability in cities and sustainable urbanism.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Small group seminars

Aims & Outcomes

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, reflection and critical discussion around key concepts and themes in sustainable urbanism. Through active small-group seminar discussions centred on key readings, students will develop a deeper knowledge of practices and theories associated with the subject matter.

Structure/Outline

There will be five sessions focussing on selected readings on the following topics:

  • The sustainable city
  • Resilience and the city
  • Growth and sustainability in the city
  • Technology, behaviour and the city
  • Environmental justice and the city

Staff

Dr Tse-Hui Teh
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Dr Jo Williams
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Assessment

Coursework: 100%
2,500 word essay on one of the module topics.

Indicative Reading

Detailed lists of readings will be provided.

BENVGSU3 Sustainable Urban Design

To achieve sustainable outcomes has now become an accepted best practice norm in nearly all aspects of contemporary life, but what does this mean when it comes to urban design? What types of sustainable outcomes can be achieved with all the competing factors of urban life? What types of spatial and social change do sustainable urban design proposals create?

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is taught through a combination of lectures and project work. There will be tutors available for group tuition during the designated tutorial periods. The lectures will cover different ideas of sustainability and urban design. The project work will synthesize the abstract concepts of urban design and sustainability by applying these ideas to a place.

Aim

This module will explore the ideas of sustainable urban design through making an urban design proposal.

Outcomes

On completion of this course you will have:

  • Recognised different interpretations of sustainability in urban design.
  • Formulated and demonstrated how an interpretation of sustainable urban design would manifest in an urban design proposition.
  • Researched and gained knowledge of systems and technologies that can be used to achieve less resource intensive outcomes than current systems.
  • Explained how the implementation of these resource reducing technologies can inform urban strategies.
  • Explained the relations between people, technologies, resource consumption, ecologies and urban form.
  • Developed skills in formulating graphic and verbal sustainable urban design proposals.

Structure/Outline

 Week 1 Lecture & tutorial
 Week 2 Lecture & tutorial
 Week 3 Presentations
 Week 4 Lecture & site visit
 Week 5 Lecture & tutorial
 Week 6 READING WEEK
 Week 7 Tutorial
 Week 8 Presentations
 Week 9 Tutorial
 Week 10 Tutorial
 Week 11 Presentations

Staff

Dr Tse-Hui Teh
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Patricia Canelas
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Bill Dunster OBE/ZEDFactory

Assessment

Assessment is by presentation (40%) and submission of project work (60%) to be undertaken in groups.

Indicative reading

  • Dunster, Bill, Craig Simmons, and Bobby Gilbert. The ZEDbook: Solutions for a Shrinking World. 1st ed. Abingdon; New York: Taylor & Francis, 2008.
  • Hester, Randolph T. Design for Ecological Democracy. 1st ed. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2006.
  • Kahn, Andrea. Constellations: Constructing Urban Design Practices. New York: Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation of, 2007.
  • McDonough, William, and Michael Braungart. Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things. New York: North Point Press, 2002.
  • McHarg, Ian L. Design with Nature. 1st ed. New York, Chichester: Wiley, 1995.
  • Shove, Elizabeth. Comfort, Cleanliness and Convenience: The Social Organization of Normality. illustrated ed. Oxford; New York: Berg Publishers, 2004.
  • Spirn, Anne Whiston. The Granite Garden: Urban Nature and Human Design. New York: Basic Books, 1984.
  • Tufte, Edward R. Envisioning Information. Cheshire, Connecticut: Graphics Press USA, 1990.
BENVGSU4 Personal Project in Planning

To complete the MSc Urban Design and City Planning and MSc in Sustainable Urbanism, students are given the option to submit a Major Research Project. This project should typically focus on a key area of knowledge covered in the course, e.g. urban design, urban design guidance and control, housing and development, sustainable urban design, sustainable transport, or other. 

A Major Research Project represents an in-depth exploration of a complex topic / problem. It is a demonstration of knowledge, a critique, and the application of this knowledge and critique into a project. The project will focus on a particular site, method or process and will be propositional, delivering a vision, and working it out in depth as to exhibit its potential, but also reflect upon its limitations. The major project should embrace the complexity of the chosen topic and apply knowledge in a critical and reflective manner. 

The project will prepare students to enact positive change through design and is an opportunity to develop both research and problem-solving skills and abilities whilst entering in-depth a particular area of studies and explore a problem that is up-to-date, critical and complex.

A Major Research Project should integrate a literature review and analytical research, but most importantly it will be propositional.

The research work is the culmination of students’ Masters programme, and therefore their chance to develop a major and largely self-managed study. It is something students take with them, and use to demonstrate their expertise and launch the next stage of their career. 

Teaching and Learning Methods

Students will be assigned a practice-based supervisor from amongst consultants working within the Sustainable Urbanism and Planning, Design and Development fields. All students will have 5 formal opportunities 3 individual face-to-face supervision meetings to discuss their project with their practice-based supervisors, and 2 workshops, in which students will need to present their project and will received feedback across the team of supervisors and students involved in this Major Projects route.

Aims & Outcomes

Major projects are by their nature STUDENT-DRIVEN EXERCISES that should draw from and allow students to reflect on the range of subject-matter covered in the taught modules.

The purpose of undertaking an in-depth study of this nature is to enable students to apply the knowledge and skills acquired from their broader programme to a detailed investigation of a relevant topic / issue / site / etc., thereby demonstrating an ability to apply theory to the analysis of a topic, and demonstrating an ability to design and execute an appropriate project programme of personal choice and study.

The research project should aim to:

  1. Identify an original study that will make a clear contribution to practice-based knowledge in your chosen area
  2. Establish and address clearly identified, focused and fundamental questions / issues
  3. Break these down into coherent project objectives that can be addressed within the constraints of the work programme
  4. As relevant, critically review the relevant literature, which including theory and or practice-related debates
  5. Bring forward a framework of issues that will guide project work
  6. Establish a personal work programme and methodology in order to tackle the project objectives
  7. Define the project site, perform site-analysis and gather design data as relevant, as to support proposals for change
  8. Write and graphically present the work clearly and concisely in a professional manner in a way that logically presents evidence and analysis and which draws out, as relevant, clear conclusions, insights and propositions for change 

Structure/Outline

Topic: “SMART CITIES”

The Major Projects topics are developed under the umbrella theme of “Smart Cities”.   The EU Commission has in June 2011 launched ‘The Smart Cities and Communities Initiative’. This initiative calls for pilot projects that make the production and use of energy in cities more sustainable and efficient. 

Projects may regard the use of the latest technologies, systems and energy generation methodologies and energy efficiency policies in the design and delivery of urban neighbourhoods and places. But also, how communities and the public in general, and other stakeholders, may be involved in the process of creating energy-efficient cities. 

Broadening the focus of the notion of Smart City broadly as one that performs sustainably, other factors, beyond that of energy, will also be related, such as, the design and delivery of adaptable environments/ developments/communities, the design and delivery of livelihoods, and fostering wellbeing and health (sustainable living) in the city. 

These are concerns at the core of several planning research initiatives, including the BRE through their BREEAM communities scheme and the UCL Sustainable Cities Grand Challenges. 

Staff

Module coordinator

Dr Filipa Wunderlich
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Supervisors

Various (Practitioners from Design for London, Urban Initiatives, Urban Movement, East Landscape and Urban Design, 00Architecture, and others)

Assessment

Deadlines and mode of submission

Students are asked to decide on whether to embark on the Projects route in Term 1, by early December. They will need to submit a brief 300 words summary proposal in Term 2 by the end of January. Supervisors are allocated by early March, and research proposals submit by end of April, still in Term 2.

Interaction with supervisors takes place in Term 3 and over the summer, and the two review full-day workshops take place usually one in late May and another one mid July. Final submission of projects is usually the first Monday of following September.

Indicative Reading

Reading will specific to the chosen topic / subject of your Major Project, but should also be draw from across the programme of study. The following may be useful for those conducting design-related research projects.

  • Borden, I., Ruedi, K. (2006) The dissertation: an architecture student's handbook, (London: Architectural Press)
  • Bosselman, P. (1998) Representation of Places: Reality and Realism in City Design (Uni¬versity of California Press)
  • Clough, Peter; Nutbrown, Cathy (2002) A Student’s Guide to Methodology: Justifying Enquiry, London, Thousands Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications
  • Flick, Uwe (2002) 2nd Ed. An Introduction to Qualitative Research, London, Thousands Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications
  • Flaherty, Michael; Ellis, Carolyn (ed.) (1992) Investigating Subjectivity: Research on Lived Experience, London, Thousands Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications
  • Hart, Chris (1998) Doing a Literature Review: Releasing the Social Science Research Imagination, London, Thousands Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications
  • Gehl, Jan (2010)  Cities for people, Washington, D.C. ; London : Island Press
  • Laurel, Brenda (2003) Design Research: Methods and Perspectives, Cambridge (Massachusetts) and London: The MIT Press
  • Moudon, “Urban morphology as an emerging interdisciplinary research tool”.
  • Rapoport, Amos (1978)  The environment as an enculturing medium, Washington, D.C. : Environmental Design Research Association Publications    
  • Seamon, D., Mugerauer, R. (2000) Dwelling, place, and environment : towards a phenomenology of person and world, Krieger
  • Seamon, D. (2000) Phenomenology, Place, Environment and Architecture: A Review, in Environmental & Architectural Phenomenological Newsletter, Available at http://www.arch.ksu.edu/seamon/Seamon_reviewEAP.htm (last accessed in June, 2009)
  • Smith, P. F. (1980) Urban Aesthetics, in Mikellides, B. (eds.) Architecture for People: explorations in a new humane environment (London: Studio Vista)
  • Whyte, W. (1980)  The social life of small urban spaces , Washington, D.C : Conservation Foundation
  • Yin, R. (2009) Case Study Research: Design and Methods: (Applied Social Research Methods, Volume 5), (London: Sage)
  • Zeisel J (1984) Inquiry by Design: Tools for Environment-Behaviour Research, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press
  • Zube, E.H. and Moore, G.T. (1987) Advances in environment, behavior, and design, (New York; London: Plenum Press)

References of Projects

MSc Student Projects in other universities may help you understand the level of quality and proficiency expect in this project, and well as be inspirational and serve as reference to ways of graphically communicating your project.

BENVGSU7 Governance for Urban Sustainability: Key Debates

The aim is to provide an understanding of how broader governance processes for the urban scale can deliver more sustainable outcomes, including an appreciation of the role of different policy instruments and policy integration.

The module also aims to develop critical awareness of the politics and governance mechanisms shaping more sustainable cities, through a theoretically-informed exploration of issues and debates surrounding environmental and urban policy at local, national and international scales.

On completion of the module students should:

  • Appreciate the evolving history of concern with urban sustainability
  • Understand how governance processes for urban sustainability can take a variety of forms 
  • Appreciate the different theoretical frameworks for understanding governing for sustainability
  • Be able to critique arguments for ‘good governance’ from a theoretically-informed perspective
  • Be aware of how different policy instruments, singly and together, work to deliver urban sustainability

Structure/Outline

The module will comprise ten sessions as follows:

Establishing the Urban Sustainability Agenda

  • The environmental movement, sustainable development and the history of Local Agenda 21
  • Governance for urban sustainability at the international and European scales; defining urban sustainability in practice

Theories for Understanding Governing Processes

  • Problems of ‘government’ where urban sustainability is concerned: implementation, government failure, rational choice, New Public Management and institutional approaches
  • Understanding ‘governance’ and the links to communicative action and deliberation
  • Unpacking arguments for ‘good governance’ and the links to social capital, stakeholder involvement and institutional capacity
  • Postmodern approaches: governmentality, ‘baroque planning’ in the face of complexity, socio-technical studies and Actor-Network Theory

In each session, case studies of urban sustainability topics (spatial planning, transport planning, flood prevention, waste management, biodiversity promotion, etc.) will be explored from a particular theoretical vantage point. 

Policy Instruments

  • The choice of policy instruments for urban sustainability; the challenge of environmental policy integration
  • Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment
  • Connecting top-down and bottom-up governing: the case of waste management (Simonetta Tunesi)
  • The role of urban sustainability indicators and classification schemes for urban sustainability (Catalina Turcu)

Staff

Professor Yvonne Rydin
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Dr Catalina Turcu
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Dr Simonetta Tunesi
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

The module is assessed by a 2,500 word essay on a topic to be chosen from a list provided.

Criteria for assessment(s)

Apart from the generic criteria applicable to essays (see Bartlett School of Planning feedback sheet template), the specific criteria for the coursework to be prepared for this module are:

An ability to demonstrate understanding of conceptual frameworks for analyzing governance for urban sustainability Knowledge of the history and current practice of policies and processes for urban sustainability

Indicative Reading

The following is an indicative reading list of relevant books for broader reading. Detailed references for core and follow-up reading to specific topics will be provided in lecture notes.

  • Julian Agyeman. ‘Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice’ Zed Books, 2013.
  • Christopher G. Boone, and Michail Fragkias. Eds ‘Urbanization and Sustainability: Linking Urban Ecology, Environmental Justice and Global Environmental Change’ Springer, 2013.
  • Jonathan Metzger, and Amy Rader Olsson. Eds ‘Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe’s Greenest City’ Routledge, 2013.
  • Tony Manzi et al. Ed. ‘Social Sustainability in Urban Areas: Communities, Connectivity and the Urban Fabric’ Earthscan, 2010.
  • Yvonne Rydin. ‘Governing for Sustainable Urban Development’ Earthscan, 2010.
  • Robert Imrie, Loretta Lees, and Mike Raco. Eds ‘Regenerating London: Governance, Sustainability and Community in a Global City’ Routledge, 2009.
  • Eugenie Ladner Birch, and Susan M Wachter. Eds ‘Growing Greener Cities: Urban Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century’ University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.
  • Harriet Bulkeley. Eds ‘Cities and Climate Change Urban Sustainability and Global Environmental Governance’ Routledge, 2003.
  • Peter B. Evans, and Peter Evans. Eds ‘Livable Cities?: Urban Struggles for Livelihood and Sustainability’ University of California Press, 2002.
  • Mark A. Hewitt. ‘City Fights: Debates on Urban Sustainability’ James & James, 2001.
BENVGSU8 Governance for Urban Sustainability: Project

The aim is for students to understand the complexities of developing and implementing policies, projects and initiatives for urban sustainability in specific contexts through deploying different governance approaches and policy instruments.

On completion of the module, students should be able to:

  • Work effectively and collaboratively in groups
  • Understand the specific context for an urban sustainability issue through the lens of particular governance settings and how this affects the policy and practice options
  • Research the nature of an urban sustainability policy, project or initiative and its likely impact on governance arrangements (and vice versa)
  • Present the results of their group research effectively through a variety of media and show an ability to target a ‘policy audience’.

Structure/Outline

The module will take the form of a number of live projects, each undertaken by a small group of students. Currently the module is operating in collaboration with Peterborough City Council who identifies a number of urban sustainability-related problems for students to investigate and develop recommendations for tackling, from a ‘governance’ point of view. 

Staff

Professor Yvonne Rydin
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

There are two elements to the assessment.

a) The group work: Each student group will submit a 7,500 Project Report resulting from their collaborative efforts. This Project Report, together with peer assessment of contribution by individual students to the collaborative effort, will account for 60% of the marks for the module. There will be peer assessment, supplemented by Module Coordinator observation, and any student who is deemed not to be contributing satisfactorily to the collaborative effort of his/her group will receive a deduction of 10 percentage points from the Project Report mark.

b) Individual Report: Each student will also submit a 1,000 word Individual Report on a task set by the Module Coordinator. This will account for 40% of the marks for the module. 

Criteria for assessment(s)

Apart from the generic criteria applicable to essays and project work (see Bartlett School of Planning feedback sheet template), the specific criteria for the coursework to be prepared for this module are:

  • An ability to work closely to the brief set by the local authority.
  • The development of recommendations that are pertinent, practical and innovative.
  • Demonstration of a reflective and critical approach, particularly in the Individual Report.

Indicative Reading

The bibliography for BENVGSU7 will also apply to this module; for specific topics chosen for project work, bespoke bibliographies will be prepared for the students to support their work. 

BENVGTC1 Planning Practice

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught through a series of 10 two-hour sessions, which will include a mixture of lectures given by the module coordinator, other BSP staff members, and presentations from visiting practitioners.

Aims

The aim of the course is to provide the student with an appreciation of the different aspects of planning practice. The course focuses on aspects of planning practice. It seeks to enable the student to develop a fuller understanding of such practice by drawing on the research literature as well as empirical examples. Particular emphasis will be put on the links between theoretical concepts generalising about planning practice and the everyday experience of such practice involving contributions from practitioners. 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the module, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate their knowledge of different aspects of contemporary planning practice in the UK;
  • appreciate the variety of perspectives on planning practice from different actors and stakeholders involved with or affected by planning practice;
  • critically discuss the links between academic literature on planning practice, and the everyday experience of planning practice;
  • refer to relevant material from the academic literature; and draw connections between the academic literature and their knowledge or experience of planning practice; and
  • present their analysis and recommendations in the proper format of a written professional report.

Structure/Outline

SessionTopic
1

Introduction to planning practice

Enterprise and planning and developing planning strategies

2Developing planning strategies in practice - regional and local
3Managing development
4

Planning gain

Implementing spatial plans

5

Public participation

 READING WEEK
6

Case study: Planning the City of London

7The role of central Government and the Planning Inspectorate
8

Changing planning practice

9Politicians and Citizens
10

Planning skills and the planning profession

Conclusion

Staff

Dr Jessica Ferm
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

100% coursework

Assessment is based on one Term Paper.

The Term Paper (of approximately 2,500 words length) will take the form of a consultant’s report to either a central or local government client on one of the following topics:

  • The contemporary challenges of the current plan-led system.
  • The planning profession and role of planners.
  • Public participation and fairness in the planning system.

A more detailed brief will be issued at the beginning of the module. 

Criteria for assessment

Apart from the generic criteria applicable to essays OR project work (see Bartlett School of Planning feedback sheet template), the specific criteria for the coursework to be prepared for this module are:

  • Knowledge of the different facets of planning practice in the UK;
  • Appreciation of the perspectives of different actors and stakeholders in practice;
  • Reference to relevant material from the academic literature;
  • Ability to critically discuss and draw links between academic literature on planning practice, and the everyday experience of planning practice; and
  • Ability to present analysis and recommendations in the proper format of a written professional report.

Deadlines and mode of submission

Submission is via Moodle. The deadline will be after the end of Term 2 and will be specified in the course outline and on Moodle.

Feedback (formative and summative)

Guidance and support available to students before the coursework is due (formative feedback):

You are strongly encouraged to discuss with your tutor(s) the preparation of the coursework before submission.  Students are encouraged to report outlines for discussion during ‘surgery’ sessions, which should be arranged with the module coordinator in advance.  The coordinator will set these up towards the end of Term 2.  Further advice on the assessment will be given during the module.

Summative feedback

The marking sheet with detailed feedback will be returned to you within 20 working days (i.e. 4 weeks).

Indicative reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle. Below is an indicative list of relevant books for broader reading.

  • Clifford, B. and Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2014) The collaborating planner? Practitioners in the neoliberal age, Policy Press.
  • Gallent, N. and Ciaffi, D. (eds) (2014) Community action and planning: Contexts, drivers and outcomes.  Policy Press.
  • Healey, P. (2012) Making Better Places: The Planning Project in the Twenty-First Century, Palgrave.
  • Healey, P. (2006) Collaborative Planning: Shaping Places in Fragmented Societies (2nd Ed), Palgrave.
  • Healey, P. et al (2002) Negotiating Development: Rationales and practice for development obligations and planning gain, Routledge.
  • Kitchen, T. (2006) Skills for Planning Practice, Palgrave
  • Ratcliffe, J., Stubbs, M., and Keeping, M. Urban Planning and Real Estate Development, Routledge
  • Rydin, Y. (2011) The Purpose of Planning,  Policy Press
  • Rydin, Y. (2013) The Future of Planning,  Policy Press
  • Sanyal, B. et al (2012) (Eds.) Planning Ideas That Matter, MIT Press
  • Tewdwr-Jones, M. (2012) Spatial Planning and Governance: Understanding UK Planning, Palgrave
BENVGTC2 Urban Design: Layout, Density and Typology

This module provides an opportunity to critically investigate the spatial characteristics and qualities of the built environment, with a focus on layout, density, and typology, and explore the use of different typologies in the development of design proposals. This project-based module aims to develop knowledge and a range of skills for carrying out urban design investigations and proposals. 

This module is the first part of the Urban Design Specialism.

Teaching and Learning Methods

This module is taught primarily through project work. Knowledge is imparted through weekly group tutorials, project reviews, and a small number of lectures (delivered by the staff and external practitioners) and developed through project work.

Aims & Outcomes

  • To develop analytical skills regarding the characteristics and qualities of the built environment; 
  • To acquire knowledge about the configuration and scale of urban form and space, the relationships between spatial elements at different scales, and how these characteristics shape urban environments and subjective qualities of places;
  • To develop design skills to carry out urban design proposals at several scales in a creative, coherent and critical manner;
  • To understand the iterative nature of the design process by exploring the use of typologies and scenario-testing in the development of urban design proposals;
  • To develop an ability to relate characteristics of urban form and space (including layout, density, and typology) with strategic design thinking that seeks to answer complex urban problems;
  • To develop graphic and presentation skills in effectively communicating urban analyses and masterplanning proposals;
  • Overall, to develop critical thinking and the ability to link theory and practice in the analysis, interpretation, and design of urban form and space. 

Structures/ Outline

Week 1

 Introduction to Module and Task 1

 Lecture + Site visit

Week 2

 Lecture

 Group Debate and Activity

Week 3

 Introduction to Task 2

 Lecture + Tutorials

Week 4 Tutorials
Week 5

 Tutorials 

 Informal presentation of Task 2

  Reading Week
Week 7

 Introduction to Task 3

 Lecture + Tutorials

Week 8 Tutorials
Week 9

 Tutorials 

 Informal presentation of Task 3

Week 10 Tutorials
Week 11 Class presentation of Task 3

Staff

Juliana Martins
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Professor Stephen Marshall
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Colin Haylock
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with practitioners:

Neha Tayal
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Ming Cheng
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Assessment

100% coursework.

Assessment is by presentation and submission of project work to be undertaken individually and in groups.

Feedback

Formative feedback

During the term students will receive formative feedback in the weekly tutorials and project reviews.

Summative feedback

Students will receive formal summative feedback at the end of each Task.

Indicative reading

A list of references is provided in the module outline.

BENVGTC4 Urban Design: Guidance, Incentive & Control

The module focuses on the relationship between design and indirect public sector processes of influencing design outcomes through guidance, incentive and control.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module is taught primarily through the undertaking and completion of project work with tutors available for group tuition during the designated studio periods. Knowledge will be imparted through a lecture course, including a range of visiting practitioners, while knowledge is developed through the completion of a single group project.

Aims & Outcomes

  • To explore design as a tool of public policy, and debates around when and when not to intervene in design quality
  • Develop skills in the preparation of design guidance informed by local socio-economic circumstances
  • Consider means to incentivise and control the delivery of high quality design outcomes

This module does not focus on the design of development projects, instead the focus is on the engagement of planning and regeneration with design. It does, however, stress the vital importance of making positive propositions for change.

Structure/Outline

The extent to which design is recognised as a legitimate interest planning has been a matter of great controversy dating back to the evolution of the planning system in Britain. In reality, the majority of decisions planners make will be design related in one form or other - albeit at very different scales of operation - from those dealing with settlement form, to those dealing with land use mix, to those concerned with detailed design and individual site layout.

To that extent planning is undoubtedly a design discipline and planners need to be aware of, and concerned with, the design consequences of their decisions on the ground.

Planning has sometimes been seen as a reactive, negative and even reactionary process. An engagement with urban design provides the primary means to turn this around, and to create instead a proactive, positive and even visionary decision-making process.

This module explores the processes and tools that will enable planners to once again demonstrate the power of the discipline to change real places for the better.

Staff

Colin Haylock
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Assessment

Assessment is by presentation and submission of project work to be undertaken in groups. 

Indicative reading

Varies from year to year depending on the project focus.

BENVGTC5 Sustainable Urban Development: Key Themes

This module is only available to MSc SU and MSc TCP students.

This course is the first part of the two-part Sustainable Urbanism Specialism and will examine some of the key sustainability debates and literature, with a specific focus on sustainable urban development. Its overall aim is to broaden the students’ understanding of the tensions and synergies between institutional, environmental, social and economic objectives of sustainable (urban) development and to provide a cross-sectoral evaluation of how these manifest in practice, drawing on a range of UK and international examples.

Foremost, the course provides a sound and theoretical basis from which students can conduct the sustainable urban development project (BENVGTC7), the second part of the Sustainable Urbanism Specialism, in Term Two.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Each class usually consists of 1h lecture from staff, followed by 1h seminar where discussions draw on student presentations. Each student presentation will address one of the 2 questions asked by each seminar topic and will focus on examining more closely some of the issues discussed in that week’s lecture.

Aims & Outcomes

The course aims to provide students with both the skills to conceptualise a sustainable urban development as well as the ability to implement such a development, by providing an understanding of:

  • Key sustainability debates (sustainability models, definitions, measurement etc)Urban sustainability in the context of wider sustainability debates.
  • Existing tensions and synergies between, for example, environmental and economic sustainability; environmental and social sustainability etc.
  • How sustainability is understood and applied to different urban ‘fields’.
  • Strategies for achieving and implementing urban sustainable development (finance, institutions, policy, transport etc) in a range of countries.

Outline

Week 1INTRODUCTION
Defining and measuring sustainability. Indicators and certification schemes for sustainable development
Catalina Turcu
Week 2BEHAVIOUR
Pro-environmental behaviour, behaviour change theories and ‘nudge’
Catalina Turcu
Week 3ECO CITIES
Urban innovation for a sustainable planning model
Fangzhu Zhang
Week 4FUTURE PROOFING
‘Futures thinking’ and scenario development
Robin Hickman
Week 5GOVERNANCE
Governing for urban sustainability
Robin Hickman
 Reading week  
Week 6ENERGY
Lock-in, low carbon development and energy-efficiency
Catalina Turcu
Week 7TRANSPORT
Urban structure and travel
Robin Hickman
Week 8INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY
Eco-industrial park development  
Fangzhu Zhang
Week 9CITIES AND GREEN ECONOMY
A useful pairing of two discourses?
Guest lecturer: Philipp Rode, LSE Cities
Week 10BICESTER
The first eco-town development in the UK
Guest lecturer: Lewis Knight, Bio Regional

Staff

Dr Catalina Turcu
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Dr Fangzhu Zhang
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Dr Robin Hickman
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Assessment

Coursework: 100% (80% individual essay + 20% group presentation)

Criteria for assessment(s)

  • Evidence that the student has gained a good understanding of the areas covered by the module.
  • Evidence that the student's capability to synthesise the multiplicity of concerns that make up the agenda for sustainable urban development.
  • A demonstrated ability to take this knowledge further in the context of his/her own in-depth studies as displayed in the set seminar and essay.
  • A demonstrated capability of effectively disseminating this knowledge in oral, written and (where appropriate) in graphical terms.

Deadlines and mode of submission

Group presentations (20%) will run weekly based on each week's topic. In the aftermath of the presentation each student from the group has the obligation to upload individually in Turnitin their group presentation. Failing to do so will result in the student not being able to receive his/her mark and feedback.

Individual essays (80%) will be uploaded electronically in Turnitin. Failing to do so will result in mark penalties (see UCL procedure for late submissions).

Feedback (formative & summative)

Feedback for group presentations will be given orally (summative) following each presentation. Formative feedback will also be posted in Moodle following each presentation.

Individual essays will receive formative feedback in Moodle within 20 working days (i.e. 4 weeks) of submission.

Indicative reading

  • Bell, S. and Morse, S. (2005) Measuring sustainability. Learning from doing, London: Earthscan.
  • Borghesi, S. & Vercelli, A. (2003) Sustainable globalisation, Ecological Economics, 44: 77-89.
  • Breheny, M.J. (ed.) (1992) Sustainable Development and Urban Form, Pion. 
  • Droege, P (2006) The Renewable City: A Comprehensive Guide to an Urban Revolution, Earthscan : London.
  • Ekins, P (2000) Economic growth and environmental sustainability, London: Routledge. 
  • Hickman, R. et al (2009) Planning for Sustainable Travel. Report to CfIT. Summary guide, technical report and website www.plan4sustainabletravel.org   
  • Hickman, R., Ashiru, O. and Banister, D. (2010) Transport and climate change: simulating the options for carbon reduction in London. Transport Policy, 17(2), pp. 110-125.
  • Jackson, T (2009) Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet, Earthscan: London.
  • Leach, M., Scoones, I., & Stirling, A. (2010). Dynamic Sustainabilities - Technology, Environment and Social Justice. London: Earthscan.
  • Lehmann, S (2010) The Principles of Green Urbanism, London: Earthscan.
  • Pearce, D and  Barbier, E.  (1995) Blueprint for a Green Economy, Earthscan.
  • Rydin, Y. (2010) Governing for Sustainable Urban Development Earthscan: London.
  • Stern, N. (2007) The economics of climate change: the Stern review, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Turcu, C. (2012a) Local experiences of urban sustainability: Researching Housing Market Renewal interventions in three English neighbourhoods. Progress in Planning, 78(3): 101-150.
  • Turcu, C. (2012b) Re-thinking Sustainability Indicators: local perspectives of urban sustainability. Environmental Planning and Management.
  • Williams, J (2011) Zero carbon homes: a road map, Earthscan: London.

 

BENVGTC7 Sustainable Urban Development: Project

This 15 credits course is the second part of the two-part Sustainable Urbanism Specialism. Its aim is to apply the more theoretical concepts of sustainable urban development (learnt during BENVGTC5: Key Themes in Term One) to a real life project and undertake an inter-disciplinary and applied approach to the understanding of urban development/ re-development. It is only available to SU and TCP students.

The project will enable students to consider the potential options for achieving environmental, social, economic and institutional sustainability objectives for a specific city/ large urban area. Students will be asked to develop a Strategic Sustainable Urban Plan (SSUP) for the area addressing a number of urban aspects.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The module’s teaching philosophy rests on student-centred learning and consists of a mixture of:

  • lectures (tutor-led)
  • tutorials (collaborative); and
  • group presentations and work (student-led).

Students are provided with some of the information they need to complete the task, but they are expected to identify additional useful data sources and literature for analysis.

Aims & Outcomes

The project aims to provide students with the skills to plan for strategic and sustainable urban development as well as the ability to identify both the financial and institutional mechanisms to implement such a development in practice.

Structure/Outline

The Sustainable Urban Development Project will be developed in 4 stages. 

All guest speakers are to be confirmed.

Step 1: Scene Setting & Strategic Planning (week 1 + 2)

 Week Description
 1

0.5h – Lecture: Module introduction (Catalina Turcu)
1.5h – Lecture: Stockholm - Setting the scene and the low carbon agenda (Jo Williams)

1h – Student  group composition & tutor allocation

 21.5h – Lecture: Strategic Planning and Complexity (Mike Duff, Concerto)
1.5h – Lecture: What is a SSUP: Introduction & Previous Examples (Catalina Turcu)

Step 2: Key Policies/ Strategies & Focus (week 3 + 4 + 5)

 Week Description
 3

1.5h – Lecture: Transport, Access & Mobility (Stephen Marshall, BSP)

1.5h – Group tutorials

 41.5h – Lecture: Urban Form ((Elisabeta Ilie/ Patricia Canelas/Gualtiero Bonvino)
2h – Group tutorials
 5(10.00 – 10.15 Presentation Uploading)
10.15 -13.00 Interim Group Presentations & Stockholm Visit Action Plan 


Week 6 – Reading Week (16-19 Feb 2015 – Stockholm Field Trip; 18 Feb UCL-KTH Student workshop)

Step 3: Implementation (week 7 + 8)

 Week Description
 71.5h – Lecture: Implementing large-scale strategic urban visions (David Lock, David Lock Associates)
1.5h – Group tutorials
 81.5h – Lecture: Financial and governance mechanisms (Catalina Turcu)
1.5h – Group tutorials


Step 4: SSUP: Stockholm 2035  (week 9 + 10 + 11)

 Week Description
 91.5h – Lecture: Communities and planning (Yasminah Beebeejaun)
1.5h – Group tutorials
 10No lectures or tutorials this week
 11(10.00-10.30 Presentation Uploading)
10.30-13.00 Final Group Presentations: the ‘elevator pitch’ Invited guests: Ulf Ranhagen (KTH, SWECO), Agneta Persson (WSP Group), Niklas Svensson (City of Stockholm)

Staff

Dr Catalina Turcu
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Dr Jo Williams
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Dr Robin Hickman
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Assessment

Coursework: 100% (50% group report + 30% individual essay + 20% group presentation)

Indicative Reading

  • Erman, M. (2012). The Walkable City - the Concept of Stockholm. Paper presented at the REAL CORP 2012 Tagungsband.
  • Jansson, A. (2013). Gentrification in Hjorthagen-Stockholm Royal Seaport: A detailed study on the areas changes and future. Stockholm University, Stockholm.LSE Cities. (2013). Stockholm. Green Economy Leader Report. London: London School of Economics (LSE).
  • Metzger, J., & Rader Olsson, A. (Eds.). (2013). Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe's Greenest City London: Routledge.Reardon, M. (2010). An Opportunity for Renewal: The Participatory Process and Social and Income Diversity in Brownfield Developments. Stockholm University, Stockholm.
  • Rytterbro, J. (2011). Prospects of a sustainable transport system: the case of Stockholm Royal Seaport in 2030. Scenarios of travel behaviour and technological change for a fossil fuel free transport system. KTH, Stockholm.
  • Stockholm City. Stockholm Royal Seaport Vision 2030.
  • Svane, O., Wangel, J., Engberg, L. A., & Palm, J. (2011). Compromise and learning when negotiating sustainabilities: the brownfield development of Hammarby Sjöstad, Stockholm. International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development, 3(2), 141-155.
  • Williams, J. (2011). Zero-carbon Homes: A Road Map London: Routledge.
  • Williams, J (2013) The role of planning in delivering low-carbon urban infrastructure. Environment and Planning B, PLanning and Design 40(4) pp 683-706.
  • Wu, J. (2012). Scheduling Smart Home Appliances in the Stockholm Royal Seaport. KTH, Stockholm.

Websites    

Stockholm Royal Seaport
EU
2020 Cities
Ericsson video
Ericsson creative cities
Smart Grid for a sustainable city in Stockholm Royal Seaport
SRS Working together
Eco- Districts

Also, please see Moodle uploads.

BENVGTP1 Transport Planning and the City

As we progress in the second decade of the 21st century, it is very apparent that a transition to greater sustainability in travel will be a large challenge in most, if not all, contexts globally. Almost all cities are experiencing a myriad of problems related to the use of the private motor car – transport carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are rising in almost all contexts and car dependent travel behaviours seem very difficult to discourage.

The impacts of large traffic volumes on the city include: rises in CO2 emissions; local air pollution; severance, large casualty rates associated with traffic accidents; poor accessibility for non-car users; poor facilities for walking, cycling and public transport; and a continued dispersal of development, often over very large areas. Congested streets are overwhelming cities worldwide.

The challenges for transport are increasingly important to the success of cities, yet the conventional economic and mobility growth model seems to be a poor framework for achieving sustainability objectives. New transport and urban planning strategies, projects and programmes need a revised approach.

With over 30 years of research and practice in developing sustainable transport initiatives, there are many innovative practices available – including a range of policy measures and policy packages that work well for managing travel demand in cities and between cities.

Much of the innovative practice remains ad-hoc in nature, investment levels are still too focused on roadbuilding, and almost all of the new development we build – in the Western industrialised and emerging cities – remains car dependent. For the transport planner, these are huge challenges – there is much to be done in understanding the rationale for mobilities, the ‘fixity’ and necessity of car usage for many lifestyles – and the solutions that we might use to more effectively manage traffic in different contexts.

There are concerns on the environmental footprint of infrastructure and cities, on the economic competitiveness and social equity of cities, and how these issues may interrelate. The most effective integration between transport and city development, and issues of governance and institutional capacities, are all fruitful areas for research, with strong potential for application in practice.

Aims & Outcomes

The aims of the module are to provide a social science understanding of transport planning, particularly with respect to the framework of sustainable mobility, and the design of sustainable cities. This includes exploring the emerging theory in the transport and urban planning field, and also considering the effective application in practice. In particular, the module aims to: 

  • Critically examine the concept of sustainable development as this relates to transport and city planning, in view of the problems currently being faced in transport planning.
  • Explore the historical trajectory of cities and city planning, including exploring the development of London as a case study.
  • Examine the use of approaches, such as scenario analysis and backcasting, which may help to conceive different transport and city planning futures.
  • Understand the role of transport investment in encouraging economic development and social justice.
  • Consider the sociological and psychological determinants of mobilities, i.e. the rationales behind travel and the often problematic ‘fixity’ of  car usage within society and everyday life.
  • Understand the different scales of intervention, including the role of urban streetscape design as a micro-level intervention to encourage  walking and cycling.
  • Explore the role of governmental mechanisms and capacities in developing the sustainable city.

Staff

Dr Robin Hickman
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Assessment

100% coursework.

Indicative Reading

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle.

BENVGTP2 International Case Studies in Transport and City Planning

Building on the fundamental principles, theories and narratives of transport and city planning, explored in term one (BENVGTP1), the focus of this module is on lining theoretical and practical issues with real world experiences, through international case studies. 

Areas of particular interest include recent research, innovation and good practice in sustainable mobility. The first half of the module examines these areas within the context of Europe and 'advanced' economies of the Global North. 

The second half concentrates more specifically on issues in relation to the developing and emerging countries of the Global South; countries that experience some of the fastest rates of economic and population growth globally.

Here, rapid growth is currently occurring in cities where overall transport infrastructure remains modest brings a myriad of challenges to transport planners, including motorisation with attendant problems of congestion, air pollution and sprawl; the institutional capacity to provide sufficient and appropriate increases in transport capacity; strategic dilemmas over transport technology; and upkeep and maintenance.

These typical challenges are framed by longer term matters of environmental and social sustainability as well as economic viability in the face of issues such as peak oil. 

By way of lectures, student presentations and discussion exercises, the first part of this module broadly exposes some of the key strategic issues, dilemmas and opportunities facing urban transport planners in emerging countries, whilst the second looks in greater detail at some of the solutions that have been applied in particular case studies. In the background sits a question of knowledge and technology transfer, both from ‘advanced’ to emerging nations, and between emerging nations themselves. This point will be considered in detail towards the end of the course. 

Aims & Objectives

Assisted by the experience of academics and practitioners working in both emerging and the advanced world, the overall aim of this module is to explore the main challenges, dilemmas and opportunities confronting transport planners by way of international case studies. In support of this overall aim, the module has five specific academic objectives:

  1. Explore the linkages between theory and practice in transport and city planning, and examples of good (and bad) practice in relation to issues confronted;
  2. How strategic issues of rapid growth and motorisation are being addressed in emerging economies;
  3. Evaluate the solutions to specific emerging city transport problems by way of empirical case studies;
  4. Investigate the scope and appropriateness of knowledge and technological transfer between emerging nations and from advanced nations;
  5. Consider the future directions for transport and city planning in the face of social and environmental sustainability issues and energy insecurity

In addition to the five academic objectives, the module aims to develop students’ presentation skills through formal briefing sessions, analytical skills by a practical exercise to evaluate and summarise a journey by public transport, and critical thinking through class discussion exercises and preparation for an exam in term three.

Staff

Dr Iqbal Hamiduddin
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

i. A two-hour examination (80%) in term three, in which two essay papers will be required to be written from a bank of six questions.

ii. Coursework (20%), consisting of a short (15 min) group oral presentation and accompanying 1-2 page summary of key points.

Indicative Reading

  • Dimitriou, H. and Gakenheimer, R. (2011) Urban Transport in the Developing World: A Handbook of Policy and Practice, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.

A full reading list is available in the module outline and additional readings will be provided in Moodle.

BENVGUR2 Development Projects

Students should gain theoretical and practical understanding of:

1. the roles played by social and economic institutions in the development of land, infrastructure

and property in a variety of times and places;

2. the historical and contemporary importance of the main forms of development organisation and of the interaction of land ownership, construction, development and investment finance, planning, fiscal and other regulatory facets;

3. the ways through which land use is connected with value generation and the significance of value distribution to the various agents involved in development

4. the fundamentals of property development including the practical application of risk management, valuation and appraisal techniques.

Students who complete the course successfully should:

1. have a clear grasp of the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of forms of development

organisation, risk management and financing;

2. be equipped to evaluate past and contemporary developments from a variety of standpoints;

3. be able to exercise skills in appraising development projects.

4. be able to understand the process of value generation in property development and

the institutional factors affecting its distribution

Students with no background in economics are strongly recommended to attend the Economics Induction Session; if you miss this, please ensure you have the notes and reading list.

Structure/Outline

This is a 10-week course of lectures, discussions, seminars and site visits.

The indicative lecture series is as follows:

Lecture 1. Development in Context

Lecture 2. The Development Process

Lecture 3. Actors, Functions, Strategies in Development

Lecture 4. Development Structures 1

Lecture 5. Development Structures 2

Reading Week- No Lecture

Lecture 6. Financing, Risk and Opportunity in Development

Lecture 7. Financing, Risk and Opportunity in Development

Lecture 8. Case Studies

Lecture 9. Techniques of analysis 1

Lecture 10 Techniques of analysis 2

Staff

Dr Nikos Karadimitriou
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Assessment

Coursework: 100%

Description of assessment(s):

The coursework will take the form of a Case Study Report (of approximately 2300 words) to be written either individually or in groups of two persons.

Assessment Timetable

Report due for submission early in Term 2; feedback can be expected 4 weeks later.

Indicative reading

  • Aldous T (1995) Economics of Urban Villages. London: Urban Villages Forum
  • Adams D., 1994, Urban Planning and the Development Process, London: UCL Press
  • Adams D., C Watkins and M White (eds.), 2005, Planning, Public Policy and Property Markets, Oxford: Blackwell
  • Ball, M, C Lizieri and B D MacGregor, 1998, The economics of commercial property markets, London: Routledge
  • Brett M, 1997, Property and Money, London: Estates Gazette
  • Byrne P., (2nd ed.) 1996, Risk, Uncertainty and Decision-Making in Property Development. London:
  • Taylor & Francis
  • Coakley J, 1994, 'The Integration of Property and Financial Markets', Environment and Planning A, Vol. 26, pp. 697-713.
  • D'Arcy E and G Keogh, 1997, "Towards a property market paradigm of urban change",
  • Environment and Planning A, Vol. 29, pp. 685-706.
  • De Magalhães C, 1999, 'Social Agents, the Provision of Buildings and Property Booms: The Case of São Paulo', International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Vol. 23, p. 445-63.
  • Doak J., Karadimitriou N., 2007, '(Re)development, complexity and networks: a framework for research' Urban Studies, Vol. 44, pp 209-229
  • Fainstein S, 1994, The City Builders: Property, Politics and Planning in London and New York, Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Guy S. and Henneberry J. (eds.), 2002, Development and Developers: Perspectives on
  • Property, Oxford: Blackwell
  • Guy S and J Henneberry, 2000, "Understanding urban development processes: Integrating the economic and the social in property research". Urban Studies, Vol. 37, pp. 2399-2416.
  • Healey P., 1994, "Urban policy and property development: the institutional relations of real-estate development in an old industrial region" Environment and Planning A 26, pp. 177 – 198
  • Healey P, 1992, 'Development Plans and Markets', Planning Practice and Research, Vol. 7, pp.13-20
  • Healey, P., Davoudi, S., O’Toole, M., Tavsanolu, S. & Usher, D. (eds.), 1992, Rebuilding the City: Property-led Urban Regeneration, London: 
  • Spon London Docklands Development Corporation, 1998, Attracting Investment, Creating Value: Establishing a Property Market in London Docklands. London: LDDC
  • Syms P, 2002, Land, Development and Design, Oxford: Blackwell
  • Wilkinson S., Reed R., 2008, Property Development, London: Routledge
BENVGUR4 Case Studies in Preparing Regeneration Projects

Teaching and Learning Methods

This is a project module, in which the main activity is the development of a group project on urban regeneration. The course is delivered through weekly group meetings and tutorial sessions, with two lectures at key stages of project work and group presentations to the class.

Aims

This module requires students, working in small groups, to develop a diagnostic account of the problems of a chosen locality, then to generate and defend their own proposals for policy or intervention. The aims of the module are to develop the students' ability to:

  • Use the theoretical and applied knowledge gained in the first term to identify urban problems that can be dealt with by urban regeneration interventions
  • put together and defend a set of viable proposals that could address those problems
  • reflect on the trade-offs between results and costs of regeneration proposals
  • investigate how proposals can be delivered within the constraints of existing urban governance arrangements
  • understand the connections between short-term outputs of regeneration interventions and their long-term outcomes
  • work in groups and be able to manage group work dynamics

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the module students should have gained a more rounded and empirically grounded understanding of the scope,  limitations and potential of urban regeneration interventions, their insertion in urban governance mechanisms and the nature and implications of the policy decisions involved in urban regeneration.

Structure/Outline

The course is developed over 10 weeks.

Week 1 introduces the course and the project work with a lecture on regeneration projects;
Weeks 2, 3 and 4 are taken up by group tutorials and group meetings, for the development of proposals for regeneration interventions in the locations chosen by the groups;
Week 5 has interim presentations by the group of the work developed so far;
Week 6 is Reading Week;
Week 7 is dedicated to a second lecture on the funding, costing and delivery of regeneration projects;
Weeks 8 and 9 are taken up by group tutorials and group meetings, to discuss and develop the costing and delivery mechanisms for the groups' proposals as well as the systems for monitoring and assessing their outcomes;
Weeks 10 and 11 have final presentations of the work of the groups.

Staff

Dr Claudio De Magalhães
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Prof Fulong Wu
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Assessment

Description of assessment(s)

Coursework: 100%

The module is organised around the production of a group project for an urban regeneration intervention in an area of London chosen by group. The class will work in groups of 4-5 individuals and the project output would be a reasoned proposal for support from a project client (a local authority or a national or supranational urban regeneration agency).

Each group will have to identify a study area in the London region and probably work at a variety of scales.  Each group will then work on the diagnosis of economic, social and physical problems of their area based on visits and available statistics, generating a proposal for intervention or action followed by a report. Students should aim to make a case for their project as the best way to tackle a specific problem or a range of issues that the group considers problematic. The assessed outputs of the project work are:

  • a group final report (60% of the course marks)
  • a live final presentation of the project to class (20% of the course marks)
  • an individual statement from each member of the group (20% of the course marks)

There is no word limit for the group report; however, students are encouraged to submit a logically complete and coherent proposal that covers all aspects of the brief. This usually takes about 7,000 words. The report should include at least the following:

  • An executive summary
  • Background context and data analysis
  • Project aims, objectives, proposed activities/projects and anticipated outputs
  • Proposed delivery vehicle and governance structure
  • Financial details
  • Funding arrangements
  • Evaluation arrangements
  • Risks of the proposals and risk mitigation strategies
  • Post-intervention strategy
  • Maps, photos, graphs etc as required by the proposals

The final presentation of the project to the class will last approximately 15 minutes and should give an overview of the group's project, its objectives, proposals and feasibility.

The individual statement should be a maximum of 1,000 words long. It should provide a personal account of how the team approached the regeneration issues at hand, what alternatives were considered and the student's personal views on the significance of the proposed initiatives ñ whether the group proposals would make a real difference if it were implemented, why and how. 

Criteria for assessment(s)

A proportion of the marks (20%) will be awarded for the individual’s understanding of the case study work (through the individual statement); 20% will be based on the final group presentation and 60% on the final group report

Handing in a complete, relevant and logically coherent proposal that fully addresses the requirements of the brief is essential. Extra marks awarded for innovative and creative solutions, good presentation/graphics/photos/maps.

For the report, tutors will be looking at the following criteria:

  • Clarity and relevance of contextual background (inc. existing policies)
  • Clarity of analysis leading to proposals
  • Relevance and coherence of proposals
  • Clarity and appropriateness of delivery structure
  • Relevance and coherence of financial and funding assumptions
  • Clarity and appropriateness of evaluation arrangements and of long term strategy
  • Structure and quality of writing
  • Quality and clarity of presentation
  • Quality and appropriateness of referencing and bibliography

For the presentation, tutors will be looking at:

  • Relevance of background & clarity of problematic
  • Relevance/articulation of proposals
  • Clarity/appropriateness of delivery structure and funding arrangements
  • Clarity/appropriateness of expected outcomes in the short, medium and long terms
  • Talk clarity, length
  • Visuals clarity, effectiveness
  • For the individual statement tutors will be looking at the studentís understanding of the group proposal and its potential and limitations, as well as role in regenerating the chosen area.

Deadlines and mode of submission

  • Interim presentation (not assessed) - last Monday before Reading Week
  • Final presentation (assessed) - two last sessions of the course
  • Group report - submitted to the Planning Office in hard copy on the first Monday of the 3rd Term
  • Individual statement - submitted via Moodle on the first Monday of the 3rd Term

Feedback (formative and summative)

Formative feedback will be provided weekly through tutorials. Formative feedback will also be provided for the interim presentation, live and in writing (within a week of the presentation).

Summative feedback will be provided for the final presentation (live and in writing within a week of the presentation), for the group report (in writing up to 4 weeks after submission), and for the individual statement (in writing, through Moodle, up to 4 weeks after submission).

Indicative reading

  • Couch C, C Fraser and S Percy (eds.), 2003, Urban Regeneration in Europe, Oxford: Blackwell Science
  • BIS - Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, 2011, Understanding High Street Performance, London: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
  • Ennis N and G Douglass, 2011, Culture and Regeneration - What evidence is there of a link and how can it be measured? Working Paper 48, GLAEconomics, London: Greater London Authority
  • Evans G, 2005, Measure for Measure: Evaluating the Evidence of Culture's Contribution to Regeneration, Urban Studies, Vol. 42 (5/6), pp. 959ñ 983
  • Gripaios P, 2002, The Failure of Regeneration Policy in Britain, Regional Studies, Vol. 36, pp. 568ñ577.
  • Imrie R, L Lees and M Raco (eds.), 2009, Regenerating London: Governance, Sustainability and Community in a Global City, Abingdon: Routledge
  • Jones P and J Evans, 2013, Urban Regeneration in the UK, London: Sage
  • Karadimitriou N, C De Magalhes and R Verhage, 2013, Planning, Risk and Property Development: Urban Regeneration in England, France and the Netherlands, Abingdon: Routledge
  • Madanipour, A, 2005, Value of Place: Can physical capital be a driver for urban change? The experience of Castle Vale, Birmingham, in CABE (ed.), Physical Capital: How Great Places Boost Public Value, London: The Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment, pp. 48-71
  • Matthews P, 2012, Problem definition and re-evaluating a policy: the real successes of a regeneration scheme, Critical Policy Studies, Vol. 6 (3), pp. 243-260
  • McCarthy J, 2007, Partnership, Collaborative Planning and Urban Regeneration, Aldershot: Ashgate
  • Roberts P and H Sykes (eds.), 2000, Urban Regeneration: a Handbook, London: Sage.
  • Rhodes J, P Tyler and A Brennan, 2005, Assessing the Effect of Area Based Initiatives on Local Area Outcomes: Some Thoughts Based on the National Evaluation of the Single Regeneration Budget in England, Urban Studies, Vol. 42†(11), pp. 1919-1946
  • Swyngedow E, F Moulaert and A Rodriguez, 2002, 'Neoliberal urbanisation in Europe: Large-scale urban development projects and the New Urban Policy', Antipode, Vol. 34 (3), pp. 542-577
  • Tallon A, 2010, Urban Regeneration in the UK, Abingdon: Routledge
  • Webber C, K Larkin, L Tochtermann, O Varley-Winter and Z Wilcox, 2010, Grand Designs? A new approach to the built environment in England's cities, London: Centre for Cities

More specific reading will depend on the topics chosen for project work. Tutors will suggest reading lists according to the needs of each group.

BENVGUR5 Case Studies in Implementing Regeneration Projects

Teaching and Learning Methods

The course consists of ten 2-hour sessions, including a fieldclass visit to Stratford, East London. Teaching will consist of lectures and discussion seminars based on specific readings and practical materials. Students will also be expected to undertake additional private study and undertake a written 3,000 word assessment.

Aims & Outcomes

  • To provide students with an understanding of the importance of community participation throughout the process of regeneration projects
  • To demonstrate some of the challenges of participation in practice
  • To develop students' understanding of evaluation and monitoring
  • To introduce students to the key principles of project management
  • To highlight issues surrounding financing of regeneration projects and programmes

Structure/Outline

Week 1

New Developments in Regeneration/London

Week 2

What is community?

Week 3

Community and urban policy in the UK

Week 4

Theories of participation

Week 5

The new urbanism and sustainable communities

Week 6

Reading week

Week 7

Fieldclass to Stratford

Week 8

Evaluation, monitoring and the role of the project manager

Week 9

Fundraising and business planning

Week 10

Financial management for regeneration projects

Week 11

Procurement and managing contracts

Staff

Professor Mike Raco
Professor of Urban Governance and Development
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Diane Burridge
London Development Agency Manager

Assessment

One 3,000 word essay project (100%)

Indicative reading

  • Barnes, M, Newman, J and Sullivan, H (2007). Power, Participation and Political Renewal: Case Studies in Public Participation. Policy Press, Bristol.
  • Cook, CK (2005). Just enough project management. McGraw-Hill, Maidenhead.
  • Locke, D (1996). Project management. University Press, Cambridge.
  • Taylor, M (2002). Public Policy in the Community. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke.
  • Taylor, M (2007). ‘Community participation in the real world: Opportunities and pitfalls in new governance spaces’ in Urban Studies, 44(2), pp. 297-317.
  • Wates N. (1999) The Community Planning Handbook. Earthscan, London.
  • Wilcox D. (1994) The Guide to Effective Participation. Delta Press, Brighton.
BENVGUR6 Urban Regeneration: Urban Problems and Problematics

This module considers a variety of different theories that have been used to help understand urban regeneration and their practical value to regeneration policy

Teaching and Learning Methods

A series of lectures and guest lectures

Aims & Outcomes

This course aims to equip students with:

  • An understanding of some of the main theoretical perspectives on the growth and regeneration of cities and regions
  • An understanding of the relationship between theory and policy in the process of regenerating cities and regions
  • An understanding of the possibilities for government intervention and spatial and land-use planning in particular to contribute to regeneration.

Structure / Outline

Week 1Structural transformation of the economy / Regeneration, planning and the market
Week 2The new industrial spaces of post-Fordism / Agglomeration, lock-in and the City
Week 3Clusters a chaotic policy concept? / The urbanisation of capital
Week 4The city as a 'growth machine' / Growth and restraint in the US and the UK
Week 5National and regional systems of innovation: The knowledge economy and the learning region
Week 6Reading week
Week 7Urban Innovation and the Creative Class
Week 8From managerialism to urban entrepreneurialism / Selling the city: marketing as regeneration
Week 9Regeneration, gentrification and community participation
Week 10Welfare and infrastructure provision/ Mega projects and property-led regeneration
Week 11Policies and Initiatives

Staff

Professor Nick Phelps 
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Professor Mike Raco
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Assessment

100% Exam

Indicative Reading

  • Arthur, W.B. (1989) 'Competing technologies, increasing returns and lock-in by historical events', The Economic Journal 99, pp. 116-131
  • Atkinson, R. & Moon, G., (1994) Urban Policy in Britain: The City, The State and the Market, London : Macmillan
  • Benneworth, P., Danson, M., Raines, P. and Whittam, G. (2003) 'Confusing clusters? Making sense of the cluster approach in theory and practice' European Planning Studies 11, pp.511-520
  • Boddy, M., Parkinson, M. (ed.) (2004) City Matters: Competitiveness, Cohesion and Urban Governance. Bristol: Policy Press
  • Clark, T. N., (ed.), (2003), The City as an Entertainment Machine, London: Elsevier
  • Couch C., Fraser C., Percy S. (2003) Urban Regeneration in Europe. Oxford: Blackwell
  • Florida, R. (2002) The Rise of the Creative Class. New York: Basic Books.
  • G.B. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (2006) State of the English Cities. 2 Volumes. London: ODPM.
  • G.B. Deputy Prime Minister and Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (2000) Our Towns and Cities: The Future: Delivering an Urban Renaissance (Cm 4911). London: Stationery Office.
  • Glass R. (1964). London: aspects of change. London: MacGibbon & Kee.
  • Hall, P. (2000) Creative Cities and Economic Development. Urban Studies 37, pp.639-649.
  • Hutton, T.A. (2008) The New Economy of the Inner City: Restructuring, Regeneration and Dislocation in the Twenty-First-Century Metropolis. London: Routledge.
  • Hamnett, C. (1991) 'The blind men and the elephant: the explanation of gentrification', Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 16, pp. 173-189.
  • Harvey, D. (1990) The condition of postmodernity. Oxford: Blackwell
  • Harvey, D. (1985) The Urbanisation of Capital. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Henry N. (1992) 'The new industrial spaces: locational logic of a new production era' International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 16, pp. 375-396
  • Imrie, R. & Thomas, H. (1993), 'The limits of property-led regeneration', Environment and Planning C 11
  • Imrie, R (et al.), (1999) (2nd edition), British Urban Policy and the Urban Development Corporations, London: Sage.
  • Imrie, R. & Raco, M. (eds.) (2003) Urban renaissance? New Labour, community and urban policy, Bristol: The Policy Press.
  • Jacobs, J. (1969) The Economy of Cities. London: Jonathon Cape
  • Jones P., Evans J. (2008) Urban Regeneration in the UK: Theory and Practice. London: Sage
  • Lucci, P., Hildreth, P. (2008) City Links: Integration and Isolation. London: Centre for Cities.
  • Molotch, H. (1993) 'The political economy of growth machines', Journal of Urban Affairs 15, pp. 2-53
  • Page, S.J. & Hardyman, R, 1996, 'Place marketing and town centre management: A new tool for urban revitalisation?', Cities 13, pp. 153-164.
  • Phelps, N.A. and Ozawa, T. (2003) 'Contrasts in agglomeration: proto-industrial, industrial and post-industrial forms compared', Progress in Human Geography 27, pp. 583-604
  • Phelps, N.A. (2008) 'Cluster or capture? Manufacturing foreign direct investment, external economies and agglomeration', Regional Studies 42, pp. 457-473
  • Reade, E. (1983) 'If planning is anything, maybe it can be identified', Urban Studies 20, pp. 159-171
  • Roberts, P., Sykes, H. (ed.) (2000) Urban Regeneration: A Handbook. London: Sage
  • Scott, A.J. (1988) 'Flexible production systems and regional development – the rise of new industrial spaces in North America and western Europe', International Journal of urban and Regional Research 12, pp. 171-186
  • Smith, N. (1979) 'Towards a theory of gentrification: A back to the city movement by capital, not people' Journal of the American Planning Association 45, pp. 538-548.
  • Simmie, J., Carpenter, J., Chadwick, A., Martin, R. (2008) History Matters: Path Dependence and Innovation in British City-Regions. London: NESTA
  • Solnit, R. (2000) Hollow City, New York: Verso Books.
  • Shaw, K. & Robinson, F. (1998) 'Learning from experience: reflections on two decades of British urban policy', Town Planning Review 69, pp. 49-63
  • Urban Task Force (1999) Towards an Urban Renaissance, London: Routledge
  • While, A., Jonas, A.E.G. and Gibbs, D.C. (2004) 'Unblocking the city? Growth pressures, collective provision, and the search for new spaces of governance in Greater Cambridge, England', Environment & Planning A 36, pp. 279-304
  • Willis, K.G.; Turner, R. K. & Bateman, I. J., (2001), Urban Planning and Management, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
BENVGUR9 Critical Debates in Urban Regeneration

This module aims to provide students with an opportunity for in-depth reading, reflection and critical discussion around key concepts and themes in European and global urban regeneration. Through active small-group seminar discussions centred on student presentations, students will develop a deeper knowledge of practices and theories associated with the subject matter.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Student presentations of actual case studies in urban regeneration

Critical Discussion of their aims, methods and outcomes

Aims & Outcomes

To broaden understanding of the scope of urban regeneration projects worldwide, taking advantage of the extraordinary range of academic, professional and geographical experience of the students on this course.

Structure/Outline

10 weekly sessions, each consisting of two or three student presentations of approximately 30 minutes' duration, followed by Q&A and then open discussion. Students are encouraged to be constructively critical in their presentations.

Staff

Dr Nikos Karadimitriou
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Assessment

Examination early in the Spring Semester. This will take an open-ended form, seeking to ask students to reflect critically on the experience in the class.

Indicative reading

The class will draw on the reading that students have undertaken in their previous modules during the Autumn semester.

URBNG007 Community Participation in City Strategies

This is an elective for people in Masters programmes in Planning and Urban Studies, open also to any other UCL Masters students. It may, by agreement, be taken as an extra or by auditing. Wednesday mornings in term 2.

Teaching and learning

The course uses an innovative teaching model based on community participation in developing an analysis of London planning issues at various spatial scales. Students will read widely on the politics of spatial and strategic planning, public participation process internationally and engage in developing a detailed analysis of an aspect of London planning.

The seminars involve community organisations who have been active in the London Plan Examinations in Public and other participation processes. The assessment is based on written and/or web-based materials relevant to some level of London planning, developed in association with community organisations and the Just Space network.

Outcomes

Students will:

  • Attain advanced critical knowledge of the politics of city planning and specifically of the urban politics of London or localities within London.
  • Develop understanding of the value and challenges of community-based research.
  • Build and apply research and writing skills to work with local community groups.

Structure/Outline

Weekly class sessions + private study + field visits to groups and organisations. Student, working in small groups with a community organisation will develop a plan of work and carry it out, aiming to contribute usefully to the organisation’s objectives.

Further details will be posted on Moodle. Search for URBNG007 and log in as a guest or sign on to this module via Portico if you are sure you will take the module.

Staff

Professor Jennifer Robinson
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Michael Edwards
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Richard Lee, coordinator of the Just Space Network
Richard is a freelance organiser and community support worker who has worked with London-wide and local organisations for many years, most recently with the London Civic Forum and the Just Space Network on the latest cycle of revision to the London Plan.

Robin Brown chartered planner working as community planner in Hayes in the London Borough of Hillingdon and as an active participant in the Just Space work across London. 

Assessment

1 x 3000 word essay or report

Indicative reading

  • Robinson, J. 2008. Developing Ordinary Cities: City visioning processes in Durban and Johannesburg, Environment and Planning A 40, 74-87.
  • Michael Edwards (2010 October) Do Londoners make their own plan? in K Scanlon and B Kochan (eds) London: coping with austerity, LSE London Series, paperback, 978-0-85328-459-8, chapter 5, 57-71. Eprint http://eprints.ucl.ac.uk/20241/ Whole book is a free download at http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/LSELondon
  • Bowie, D (2010) Politics, planning and homes in a world city: the Mayor of London and strategic planning for housing in London 2000-2008, London: Routledge

Elective Modules at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analytics (CASA)

The following modules taught at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analytics are open to Bartlett School of Planning students as elective modules:

  • BENVGSA3 Geographic Information Systems and Science
  • BENVGSC1 Urban Systems Theory
  • BENVGSC2 Quantitative Methods
  • BENVGSC3 Smart Cities: Context Policy and Government
  • BENVGSC4 Spatial Data Capture, Storage and Analysis
  • BENVGSC5 Urban Simulation

Find out more on CASA's optional modules page.