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Recent experience of regulatory frameworks for land, planning and building in reducing disaster risk

This research looked at how government action and regulation can help reduce future losses from natural hazards.

13 June 2011

This research looked at how government action and regulation can help reduce future losses from natural hazards through drawing out evidence of how regulatory frameworks for planning, land-use management and building are and are not providing an enabling environment for disaster risk reduction. The focus of the study is on which governance mechanisms, partnerships, institutional frameworks and incentive structures are effective for the design and implementation of plans, codes and regulations in both formal and informal settlements, with reference to what political/economic/cultural conditions contribute to this. This research project included commissioned case studies from five countries and an organised expert meeting, leading to the production of a background paper for 2011 UNISDR Global Assessment Report. 

For more information please contact: Cassidy Johnson 

Revealing Risk, Redefining Development (Report)

The second edition of the United Nations Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction is a resource for understanding and analysing global disaster risk today and in the future.

Drawing on new and enhanced data, the 2011 report explores trends in disaster risk for each region and for countries with different socioeconomic development. At the same time, over 130 governments are engaged in self-assessments of their progress towards the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA), contributing to what is now the most complete global overview of national efforts to reduce disaster risk.

The 2011 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR11) highlights the political and economic imperative to reduce disaster risks, and the benefits to be gained from doing so. Importantly, it offers guidance and suggestions to governments and nongovernmental actors alike on how they can, together, reduce disaster risks.

 

Click here to visit the report's website