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The Bartlett experts develop model to help tackle fuel poverty in London

Experts from The Bartlett, UCL’s Faculty of the Built Environment have been working with the Greater London Authority (GLA) to help identify homes and businesses suffering from fuel poverty.

UCL experts develop model to help tackle fuel poverty in London

28 September 2022

Low incomes, high fuel costs and inefficient buildings mean that many Londoners currently can’t afford to keep their homes adequately heated.   

As part of the London Mayor’s commitment to address this urgent issue, the GLA commissioned a team from The Bartlett to develop the London Building Stock Model (LBSM). 
 
The model includes data on every building – domestic, non-domestic and mixed-use – in the 32 boroughs that make up Greater London, plus the City of London. This equates to some 1.5 million houses, 1.9 million flats and around a quarter of a million non-domestic premises. 
 
The LBSM provides a powerful data-driven tool to help the GLA identify homes and businesses suffering from fuel poverty and poor energy efficiency. Those properties can then be targeted with appropriate technologies and energy efficiency programmes.

Carlos Huggins, Senior Consultancy Manager at UCLC, said: “The UCL Energy Institute team have been developing their models and accesses to underpinning robust data for years, and it is fitting that they have now a direct impact on the evolution of energy
Philip Steadman, Emeritus Professor of Urban Studies and Built Form Studies, and Professor Paul Ruyssevelt, at UCL’s Bartlett School of Environment Energy and Resources, led the work.  
UCL Consultants (UCLC), a part of UCL Innovation & Enterprise, provided support preparing proposals for, and contracting on, the project.


Carlos Huggins, Senior Consultancy Manager at UCLC, said: “The UCL Energy Institute team have been developing their models and accesses to underpinning robust data for years, and it is fitting that they have now a direct impact on the evolution of energy efficiency in London, opening a path to supporting other cities in the future.” 

Read the full story on the UCL Consultants website.

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