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Troubling Resonances: thinking practices and problems in interdisciplinarity

10 May 2022, 2:30 pm–4:30 pm

UCL Main Building

Troubling Resonances will present plenary talks by Sir Alan Wilson FBA, FRS, Turing Institute and Dr Kit Braybrooke, Habitat Unit, Technical University of Berlin.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All

Availability

Yes

Cost

Free

Organiser

Prof Tim Jordan

Location

Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre
005: Wilkins Main Building
Gower Street
London
WC1E 6BT
United Kingdom

‘Trouble is an interesting word. … Our task is to make trouble, to stir up potent responses to devastating events, as well as to settle troubled waters and rebuild quiet places. … staying with the trouble requires learning to be truly present.’

--Donna Haraway, Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene

Trans- and inter-disciplinary thinking continue to resonate, with very few academic institutions professing anything except at least some affection of interdisciplinarity, yet specific disciplines remain the most consistent building blocks of academic life. Even if the Covid-19 pandemic required epidemiologists, artists, psychologists, philosophers, political scientists and social media analysts to understand the situation, these, nonetheless, rarely seem to have crossed paths.

This event aims to explore and underscore mutating lines of institutional codes of thinking and practice that might proliferate into new forms of experience and new modalities of learning.

Respecting disciplines while thinking and educating beyond disciplines requires the university to create sandboxes, play-spaces, innovative hubs, and a series of interlinked learning studios in order to jump-start and sustain an experimental aspect to the institution as a whole and its multiple partners.

Inter- and trans-disciplinary research and education often coalesce around academic practices which allow disciplines the experimental space to converge around worldly problems whose articulation provides a language to bring disciplines into conversation. Troubling Resonances looks to trouble these terms, to continue respectful engagements with different disciplinary practices’ while building interdisciplinary intersections and interventions.

About the Speakers

Sir Alan Wilson

Director of Special Projects at The Alan Turing Institute

Sir Alan Wilson FBA, FRS is Director, Special Projects at The Alan Turing Institute (Chief Executive, October 2016 until September 2018) and is Director of Research at The Institute of Finance and Technology in UCL. He has a new book in 2022 being published by UCL Press Being interdisciplinary: adventures in urban science and beyond. In his research, as a mathematician and geographer, he works on the science of cities, building computer models that have applications in both planning and commercial sectors. He was Professor of Urban and Regional Systems in CASA, UCL from 2007 – 2018; Vice-Chancellor of the University of Leeds from 1991 to 2004 when he became Director- General for Higher Education in the then DfES. From 2013-2015, He was Chair of the Government Office for Science Foresight Project on The Future of Cities. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society. He was knighted in 2001 for services to higher education.

More about Sir Alan Wilson

Dr Kit Braybrooke

Director at Studio Wê & Üs

Dr. Kit Braybrooke is a social scientist and artist-designer whose approach spans anthropology, geography & STS, with a focus on the dynamics of regenerative cultures, urban placemaking and feminist tech futures across Europe, Asia and Canada. They are a director of Studio Wê & Üs, which helps civil society organisations foster sustainable development through creative participation, and Senior Researcher with Habitat Unit at Technical University Berlin. They gained a PhD from University of Sussex Digital Humanities Lab for 'Hacking the Museum', a study of the UK's first museum makerspaces at Tate, British Museum & Wellcome Collection. studiowe.net | @codekat

More about Dr Kit Braybrooke