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Nikos Stangos Memorial Lecture

This lecture has been established in memory of Nikos Stangos, who was one of the directors and senior commissioning editors for Thames & Hudson publishers. He was probably the most important art editor of the late 20th century and was responsible for facilitating some of the most groundbreaking art books of our generation. Nikos was a published poet and started his career in London as a poetry editor for Penguin. He was a philosophy graduate from Harvard and collector and commentator on contemporary art. He died in 2003. 

The Department of History of Art gratefully acknowledges the ongoing support of Thames & Hudson for this lecture series.


2021

The 14th Nikos Stangos Memorial Lecture was delivered by Griselda Pollock

Friday 11th June 2021, 6-8pm 

Full details. 



Previous speakers include:

  • 2019 Martha Roslen: 'Representation, Dispossession, and the Conquest of Space: An Artist’s Talk'
  • 2018 Isaac Julien: 'Choreographing Capital'
  • 2017 Professor Caroline Walker Bynum: 'Holy Beds and Holt Families'
  • 2015 Professor Beatriz Colomina (Princeton University): 'X-Ray Architecture'
  • 2013 Professor Kaja Silverman: 'Unstoppable Development'
  • 2012 Professor Susan Buck-Morss (Cornell University): 'Seeing Global'
  • 2011 Professor TJ Clark (Visiting Professor, University of York): 'Do Landscapes have Identities?'
  • 2010 Professor Homi Bhabha (Harvard University): 'The Humanities and the Anxiety of Violence'
  • 2009 Professor Jacqueline Lichtenstein (Université Paris-Sorbonne Paris IV): 'The Philosopher and the Art Historian: An Impossible Dialogue'
  • 2008   Professor Molly Nesbit (Vassar): 'Light in Buffalo; Michel Foucault Lectures on Manet at the Albright-Knox, April 8, 1970'
  • 2007   Okwui Enwezor (Curator): 'Incarcerated Life: Contemporary Art and the Security State'
  • 2006   Professor Anne Wagner (University of California Berkeley): 'Nauman's Body of Sculpture'
  • 2005   William Kentridge (Artist): 'Reading Shadows: The Pleasures of Self-Deception'