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Institute of Archaeology

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Migeul Fuentes Munoz

Inca expansion and local populations in the Arica Highlands. Architecture, Space and Power during the Late Period (Northern Chile, XV and XVI century)

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Email: uczlfue@ucl.ac.uk
Section: World Archaeology
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Inca expansion and local populations in the Arica Highlands. Architecture, Space and Power during the Late Period (Northern Chile, XV and XVI century)

The Arica highlands in Northern Chile was the locus of a significant concentration of archaeological sites during the Late Intermediate (1000-1400 AD) and Late Period (XIV and XV century AD), with continuities in local architecture and buildings constructed in Inca state forms and styles, forming possibly the most populated and developed area of this region during pre-Hispanic times (Munoz and Chacama 2006).

The research area for this project comprises the upper segments of the Lluta-Azapa and Codpa-Camarones valleys in Arica, integrated to the Incan empire during the XIV century, however comparative areas at higher and lower altitudes, for example in the altiplano, will also be considered. During the Late Period (or LP) this area was connected by the Incan Road and other communication networks that linked it to the altiplano and Cuzco, as well as with several regions in the southern part of the Inca Empire including, for example the Arica coast, the Tarapaca and Atacama areas, Southwest Bolivia and Northwest Argentina (Santoro et al. 2010).

My research will seek to assess the role of cultural interactions of the Arica region prior to and after the Inca expansion: for example between the coast, highland and altiplano areas (Munoz and Chacama 2006). Several themes such as imperial expansionism, local engagement, architectural variability and use of space during the LIP and LP will be considered. I consider that the Arica area may provide an opportunity to assess the cultural and historical processes that characterized the presence of the Incas in this region and the responses of local populations to imperial power, and allows consideration of the transformations that the expansion process produced among local populations and the Inca state itself. This then provides a useful case-study to consider the wider issues of how to study Imperial / local interactions more widely.

Funding

CONICYT (Chile)

Education

  • BA in Archaeology / History (Universidad de Chile)
  • MA in Research Methods in Archaeology (UCL)
    Publications

    Research Project Trailer (Zapahuira Tambo Site):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-shAkcfdn_c&spfreload=10