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Institute of Archaeology

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Jason Peters

Adaptive continuity, pattern and process in the exploitation (and built environment) of woodland-pastures in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval England.

 

Email: jason.peters.14@ucl.uk
Section: World Archaeology
Supervisors:

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Adaptive continuity, pattern and process in the exploitation (and built environment) of woodland-pastures in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval England

Using regional case studies (Huntingdonshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Middlesex, Isle of Wight) the origins and history of afforestation (royal forest, forest, chase and park creation) are discussed in terms of woodland-pasture specialism, hunting rights vs. grazing rights, haga site origins and their re-use and resulting indicative features in the landscape and archaeological record. The effects of forest law and later disafforestation (removal of forest law) are discussed in terms of ecology, the built form of forest offices; including moated homesteads and lodges, subinfeudated manors within forest purlieus and traditions in high status landscape design and the 'planned' rural landscape.

Education

    • Adv.Dip Historic Environment, ICE, Cambridge, 2011.
    • MA Hons Landscape Architecture, Heriot-Watt, Edinburgh, 1998.
    Publications

    InPractice_C.I.E.E.M. _IP82_Dec_13