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UCL Anthropology

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Anthropology BSc

This programme looks at the biological, cultural, social and material culture aspects of human beings as well as their evolution. It will help you gain a broad set of skills including: critical reasoning; the ability to search, sift and analyse various materials; collaborative group work; and oral and written communication.

Key Information

Programme starts

September 2020
UCAS code
L602
Duration
Full-time: 3 years
Application deadline
15 January 2020
Location
London, Bloomsbury

Entry requirements

A Levels

Grades
AAB
Subjects
No specific subjects.
Please refer to UCL’s list of preferred A level subjects.
GCSEs
English Language and Mathematics at grade C or 5, plus Science or Biology at grade B or 6. For UK-based students, a grade C or 5 or equivalent in a foreign language (other than Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew or Latin) is required. UCL provides opportunities to meet the foreign language requirement following enrolment, further details at: www.ucl.ac.uk/ug-reqs

Contextual offer

Grades
BBB (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
No specific subjects.

IB Diploma

Points
36
Subjects
A total of 17 points in three higher level subjects, with no score below 5.

Contextual offer

Points
32 (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
A total of 15 points in three higher level subjects, with no score below 5.

UK applicants qualifications

For entry requirements with other UK qualifications accepted by UCL, choose your qualification from the list below:

Equivalent qualification

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF) or BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (RQF - teaching from 2016) with Distinction, Distinction, Distinction.

Pass in Access to HE Diploma with a minimum of 23 credits awarded with Distinction in the Level 3 units, the remainder of the credits in the Level 3 units awarded with Merit.

D3,D3,D3 in three Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects

AAA at Advanced Highers (or AA at Advanced Higher and AAA at Higher)

Successful completion of the WBQ Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate plus 2 GCE A-Levels at grades AAA. One science subject preferred.

International applications

In addition to A level and International Baccalaureate, UCL considers a wide range of international qualifications for entry to its undergraduate degree programmes.

Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates

UCL Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates (UPCs) are intensive one-year foundation courses for international students of high academic potential who are aiming to gain access to undergraduate degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities.

Typical UPC students will be high achievers in a 12-year school system which does not meet the standard required for direct entry to UCL.

For more information see: www.ucl.ac.uk/upc.

English language requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency. Information about the evidence required, acceptable qualifications and test providers can be found on our English language requirements page.

The English language level for this programme is: Good

A variety of English language programmes are offered at the UCL Centre for Languages & International Education.

Degree benefits

  • UCL Anthropology is one of the few departments in the country that combines social anthropology, biological anthropology, material culture and medical anthropology to give you a truly broad-based anthropology degree.

  • One of the largest anthropology departments in the UK, with highly-rated research, offering an exceptionally wide range of modules taught by academic staff at the forefront of the discipline.

  • Access to excellent resources including extensive literature in the UCL Main Library and other nearby libraries, such as in the Centre for Anthropology at the British Museum.

  • We have an outstanding collection of ethnographic items and the Napier Primate Collection, and work closely with the ethnographic department of the British Museum and with the Horniman Museum.

Degree structure

In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 15 or 30 credits, adding up to a total of 120 credits for the year. Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year. A 30-credit module is considered equivalent to 15 credits in the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS).

In the first year, you take compulsory modules covering the three branches of the programme; biological anthropology, social anthropology and material culture. Biological anthropology focuses on contemporary human-environment interactions and human evolution. Social anthropology explores social and cultural differences and their determinants, from indigenous groups to modern western economies. Material culture studies human, social and environmental relationships through the evidence of people's construction of their material world. Your first year also includes a three-day field trip to discover ethnographic research and participant observation in ritual, landscape, and techniques.

Your second year includes both compulsory and optional modules. In the third year, you select five optional modules from a wide range alongside a dissertation.

Modules

An indicative guide to the structure of this programme, year by year.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Introduction to Material and Visual Culture
Introductory Social Anthropology
Methods and Techniques in Biological Anthropology
Researching the Social World

Optional modules

All first-year modules are compulsory.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Theoretical Perspectives in Social Anthropology and Material Culture
Being Human

Optional modules

You will select a minimum of 75 and a maximum of 90 credits from Anthropology optional modules which must include choices in biological, social, material culture and medical anthropology.

Anthropology of the Body
Art in the Public Sphere
Ethnography of Forest People
Linguistic Anthropology
Medical Anthropology
Palaeoanthropology
Primate Behaviour and Ecology
The Anthropology of Social Media

You may take up to a maximum of 15 credits from other undergraduate elective modules outside the department.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Individual Studies in Anthropology

Optional modules

You will select a minimum of 60 and a maximum of 75 credits from all final-year Anthropology options. These may include:

Anthropology of Capitalism
Ethnographic and Documentary Film Making - a practice-based introduction
Evolution and Human Behaviour
Reproduction, Fertility and Sex
Ritual Healing and Therapeutic Emplotment
Temporality, Consciousness and Everyday Life
The Anthropology of Music and Performance
Transforming and Creating Worlds: Anthropological Perspectives on Techniques and Technology


You may take up to a maximum of 15 credits from other undergraduate elective modules outside the department.


Your learning

Our teaching comprises lectures, tutorials, seminars and laboratory classes. Small-group tutorials, normally meeting weekly, are an important element of many modules. Ongoing feedback is given to help you improve your written work.

Assessment

Your modules may be assessed by written coursework, by examination or a mixture of both. Examinations are normally unseen and their formats vary according to the module. Some combine short answers with essay questions, others rely solely on longer essay answers.

Careers

The broad range of methodological skills and analytical perspectives offered by the UCL Anthropology programme gives our graduates an unusually wide range of career possibilities, many of them directly related to the discipline's cross-cultural focus and to our blending of the social and biological sciences.

Former graduates work in diverse fields, such as journalism, film-making, TV, museums, social work, international development, NGOs and the voluntary sector, police, probation, refugee work, wine tasting, market research, advertising, design, PR, marketing, music industry, accountancy, local government, HR, ESL teaching, and as cultural advisors for multinationals.

UCL is commited to helping you get the best start after graduation. Read more about how UCL Careers and UCL Innovation and Enterprise can help you find employment or learn about entrepreneurship.

Student view
I wanted to study Anthropology because early on I realised that I am very interested in human interaction and the ways we socialise in combination with biological facts. Anthropology is about humans and London is such a diverse and international place. Siba Kalantari - Anthropology BSc Second Year

Fees and funding

Tuition fees

The fees indicated are for undergraduate entry in the 2019/20 academic year. The UK/EU fees shown are for the first year of the programme at UCL only. Fees for future years may be subject to an inflationary increase. The Overseas fees shown are the fees that will be charged to 2019/20 entrants for each year of study on the programme, unless otherwise indicated below.

UK/EU students
£9,250 (2019/20)
Overseas students
£26,740 (2019/20)

Full details of UCL's tuition fees, tuition fee policy and potential increases to fees can be found on the UCL Students website.

Funding

Various funding options are available, including student loans, scholarships and bursaries. UK students whose household income falls below a certain level may also be eligible for a non-repayable bursary or for certain scholarships. Please see the Fees and funding pages for more details.

Departmental scholarships

Funding opportunities relevant to the department may appear in this section when they are available. Please check carefully or confirm with the programme contact to ensure they apply to this degree programme.

The Scholarships and Funding website lists scholarships and funding schemes available to UCL students. These may be open to all students, or restricted to specific nationalities, regions or academic department.

Application and next steps

Your application

Given our broad-based degree candidates whose academic studies have encompassed arts/humanities and science (preferably biology or human biology) will be well equipped to manage all aspects of the degree.

How to apply

Application for admission should be made through UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). Applicants currently at school or college will be provided with advice on the process; however, applicants who have left school or who are based outside the United Kingdom may obtain information directly from UCAS.

Application deadline: 15 January 2020



Selection

The department has a long-standing policy of encouraging applications from those with non-standard qualifications. If you are such a candidate you may be asked to provide supplementary evidence of your suitability for the programme, for example by submitting an essay. All applications are considered on their own merits and offers may be tailored to your specific circumstances if we believe you have potential.

For further information on UCL's selection process see: Selection of students.