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Nikhil Chaudhary

Nikhil Chaudhary

Email: charan.chaudhary.11@ucl.ac.uk

Room: 326 (Postgraduate Workroom 1)

Introduction

I have conducted two fieldwork trips amounting to 7 months in the Congo rainforest where I stayed and worked with Mbendjele BaYaka Pygmies. During my fieldwork I collected genealogical and anthropometric data, and conducted economic games and childcare focal follows. I intend to use this data to study the evolutionary importance of social relationships for childcare, marriage and health outcomes. This work is part of the hunter-gatherer resilience project, which draws on research from genetics, biological and social anthropology with hunter-gatherers from the Philippines, Thailand and Congo.

Research Interests

  • Polygyny in hunter-gatherers
  • Popularity and prestige in egalitarian societies
  • Cooperative Breeding
  • Human Social Evolution

Academic Background/Education

University College London, PhD Biological Anthropology (2017)
University College London, MSc (Distinction) Human Evolution and Behaviour (2012)
London School of Economics, BSc (Upper Second) Managerial Economics and Strategy (2011)

Publications

Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Rey, A., Stevenson, E., Gerbault, P., Dyble, M., Page, A., Smith, D., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., Migliano, A.B (2016). Competition for Cooperation: variability, benefits and heritability of relational wealth in hunter-gatherers. Scientific Reports, 6, 29120-29120.

Chaudhary, N. (2016). The Polygyny Threshold - key idea in: T. Shackelford & V. Weekes-Shackelford (eds.), Encyclopaedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science. Springer.

Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Dyble, M., Page, A., Smith, D., Mace R., Migliano A.B (2015). Polygyny without wealth: popularity in gift games predicts polygyny in BaYaka Pygmies. Royal Society Open Science, 2(5), 150054-150054.

Page, A. E., Chaudhary, N., Viguier, S., Dyble, M., Smith, D., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. B. (2017). Hunter-Gatherer Social Networks and Reproductive Success. Scientific Reports, 7, 1153-1153.

A. B. Migliano, A. E. Page, J. Gómez-Gardeñes, G. D. Salali, S. Viguier, M. Dyble, J. Thompson, Nikhil Chaudhary, D. Smith, J. Strods, R. Mace, M. G. Thomas, V. Latora & L. Vinicius (2017). Characterization of hunter-gatherer networks and implications for cumulative culture. Nature Human Behaviour, 1.

Salali, G.D., Chaudhary, N., Thompson, J., Grace, O., van der Brugt, X.M., Dyble, M., Page, A., Smith, D., Lewis, J., Mace, R., Vinicius, L., Migliano, A.B. (2016). Knowledge sharing networks in hunter-gatherers and the evolution of cumulative culture. Current Biology, 26(18), 2516-2521.

Dyble, M., Thompson, J., Page, A., Smith, D., Chaudhary, N., Salali, G.D., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., Migliano, A.B. (2016). Food sharing and multilevel organization among two hunter-gatherer societies. Current Biology, 26(15), 2017-2021.

Page, A. E., Viguier, S., Dyble, M., Smith, D., Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. B. (2016) Reproductive trade-offs in extant hunter-gatherers suggest adaptive mechanism for the Neolithic expansion. PNAS, 113(17), 4694-4699.

Dyble, M., Salali, G., Chaudhary, N., Page, A., Smith, D., & Thompson, J. et al, Vinicius, L., Mace, R., Migliano, A.B. (2015). Sex equality can explain the unique social structure of hunter-gatherer bands. Science, 348(6236), 796-798.

Funding

The Leverhulme Trust