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Miranda Sheild Johansson

Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

Email: m.johansson@ucl.ac.uk

PhD Anthropology, LSE (2014)

MSc Res Anthropology, LSE (2007)

MA (hons) Social Anthropology, The University of Edinburgh (2005)

Miranda is a social anthropologist with a regional specialism of contemporary Bolivia where she has undertaken long-term fieldwork in a Quechua speaking community in the rural highlands. Miranda is interested in different conceptions of work, the value of productivity, the morality of exchange and economic subjectivities. Her main work has focused on agricultural labour. In exploring the cultural context of a rural Andean notion of work she shows how emic perceptions of personhood and animate landscapes are necessary to understanding the full meaning of agricultural labour. In turn the value of work is key in the analysis of local politics, religious conversion, exchange and local migration.

Miranda has been Teaching Fellow at UCL and is currently working on a research project called Becoming a Tax Payer: Fiscal Expansion and Economic Subjectivities in Bolivia, funded by the Leverhulme trust. Her research into taxation has developed in response to the current fiscal expansion in Bolivia. Here, hitherto informally employed subjects are being initiated into an individualised fiscal regime; they are being made into "taxpayers." This is has consequences for a broad range of issues including money, morality, exchange, subject formation and citizenship.

Research interests

  • Taxation
  • Work and Productivity
  • Agricultural Labour
  • Economic and Political Subjectivities
  • Citizenship
  • Landscape and Personhood
  • Religious Conversion
  • The Andean Region

Teaching

  • The Anthropology of Latin America
  • Introduction to Social Anthropology
  • Critical Issues
  • Theory, Ethnography and Professional Practice
  • Being Human

Publications

Sheild Johansson, Miranda (forthcoming) Taxing the indigenous: a history of barriers to fiscal inclusion in the Bolivian highlands. History and Anthropology.