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Book launch: White Fury: A Jamaican Slaveholder and the Age of Revolution - Christer Petley

5:30 pm to 7:00 pm, 24 October 2018

White Fury by Christer Petley

The story of Simon Taylor, one of the wealthiest and most influential slaveholders of the eighteenth-century British empire.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All

Availability

Yes

Cost

Free

Organiser

Dr Kate Quinn – UCL Institute of the Americas
020 7679 2000

Location

Lecture Room 103
UCL Institute of the Americas
51 Gordon Square
London
WC1H 0PQ
United Kingdom

White Fury tells the story of one of Jamaica’s most powerful colonial inhabitants: Simon Taylor, one of the wealthiest and most influential slaveholders of the eighteenth-century British empire. Using Taylor’s letters, the book sheds new light on the merciless machinery of Jamaican plantation life. It examines the impacts of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions on the British imperial slave system; and details the importance of sugar and slavery to the eighteenth-century empire, the rise of the Caribbean planter class, and the struggle over the future of slavery that took place during the Age of Revolution.

A presentation by the author Christer Petley will be followed by commentary from Gad Heuman (Emeritus Professor, Warwick University) and Katie Donington (University of Nottingham).

While attendance at this event is free places are limited and booking is required to avoid disappointment.

About the Speaker

Christer Petley

Professor of History at University of Southampton

His research explores the transatlantic connections between the Caribbean and Europe during the long eighteenth century, examining society and culture in the British West Indies, the British debate over slavery, and the transformations that reshaped the British empire in the period after the American Revolution. He is the author of Slaveholders in Jamaica: Colonial Society and Culture during the Era of Abolition (2009) and has published on various aspects of Caribbean and British-Atlantic history, including articles on free people of colour in Jamaica, planter identity, and proslavery politics. He is a member and former Chair of the Society for Caribbean Studies (UK).