XClose

Academic Manual

Home
Menu

Section 3: Framework Components

Published for 2019-20


3.1 Further Education Qualifications3.9 Mode of Study
3.2 Programme of Study (Programme)3.10 Modules
3.3 Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies3.11 Components
3.4 Academic Partnerships3.12 Taught Elements on Research Programmes
3.5 Field of Study3.13 Progression and Continuation
3.6 Academic Level3.14 Interim Qualifications
3.7 Academic and Calendar Years3.15 Industial Placements
3.8 Credit and Learning Hours3.16 Study Abroad

1.A number of components define the basic structures of all UCL Qualifications: 

3.1 Qualification

1.A Qualification is a Doctorate, Degree, Diploma or Certificate accredited and conferred by UCL following the successful completion of an approved Programme of Study.
2.A Qualification must meet the minimum academic standards set out in Section 6: Threshold Qualification Requirements.
3.

Qualifications may fall into one or more of the following categories:

  • Exit Qualifications: The full set of possible Qualifications associated with a Programme of Study, including the Final Qualification and any Interim and Alternative Qualifications.
  • Final Qualification: The intended Qualification from a Programme of Study which a student will be awarded if they meet all the Programme requirements e.g. BEng (Hons) Engineering.
  • Interim Qualification: A lesser Qualification made as a result of a student either leaving a Programme of Study early or failing to meet the requirements for the Final Qualification e.g. Cert HE Engineering. See Section 3.14: Interim Qualifications for further details.
  • Alternative Qualification: An Exit Qualification at the same Level as the Final Qualification, awarded where a student is unable to meet the specific requirements for the Programme of Study on which they initially enrolled but nonetheless meets UCL’s minimum threshold standards for the award of a Qualification. Often used where a student does not meet the professional accreditation requirements associated with a Final Qualification. Includes a named, approved, alternative Field of Study e.g. BSc (Hons) Engineering Studies.
4.The form of the Qualification Title must signify both the Level of the Qualification and the broad discipline in which the study has been undertaken (e.g. Bachelor of Science). The Qualification Title is combined with the Field of Study to create the Degree Title e.g. Bachelor of Science in Engineering. A Programme of Study may have one or more Degree Titles associated with it, reflecting different Routes and Pathways.
5.Proposals for new Qualifications must be developed in line with the Qualifications and Credit Framework, approved by Academic Committee and incorporated into Section 2: The Qualifications of UCL and Section 6: Threshold Qualification Requirements (PDF).

3.2 Programme of Study (Programme)

1.A Programme of Study (Programme) is an approved, coherent path of study with specified learning outcomes leading to a specified Qualification in a specified Field of Study. 
2.New Programmes must be aligned to Section 6: Threshold Qualification Requirements, which describe the typical characteristics of the main groups of UCL Qualifications, and approved by the Programme and Module Approval Panel on behalf of Education Committee.
3.

Programmes may include some of the following characteristics:

  • Route: A Route is a formal, named specialism within a Programme leading to a discrete Field of Study e.g. BSc Human Genetics would be a Route within the BSc Biological Sciences Programme. A Route has a specific curriculum structure, typically defined by the different Option and Elective Modules available within the Programme, and is discretely defined in the Student Record System and on the student’s degree certificate and transcript.
  • Pathway: A Pathway is an informal specialism within a Programme or Route which guides students towards a particular area but which does not lead to a discrete Field of Study. A Pathway is typically defined by the different Option and Elective Modules available within the Programme but this Pathway is not recorded separately in the Student Record System and does not appear on the student’s degree certificate or transcript.
  • Cognate Programme: A Cognate Programme is one which has a substantial volume of content and/ or teaching in common with another Programme e.g. BA (Hons) Greek and Latin would be considered cognate with BA (Hons) Latin since the Programmes have a substantial number of Modules in common.

3.3 Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies

1.

Many UCL Qualifications are recognised or accredited by Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Bodies (PSRBs):

  • Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body: A legally-recognised body which accredits, recognises, or endorses graduates from specific UCL programmes as qualified to act within a recognised profession or which leads to initial registration or supports enhanced registration with that body, e.g. the Royal Institute of British Architects or the General Medical Council.
2.These Qualifications must meet both UCL’s Threshold Qualification Requirements (see Section 6) and the PSRB’s requirements which may include additional learning hours, credits, assessments and Fitness to Practice procedures.
3.A Programme may require exemption from certain UCL regulations in order to comply with professional standards. All exemptions must be approved by Education Committee and detailed in the individual Programme Summary.

3.4 Academic Partnerships

1.A UCL Programme may be offered in collaboration with an external organisation leading or contributing to the award of UCL academic credit and/or a UCL Qualification. The requirements for Academic Partnerships are defined in the UCL Academic Manual, Chapter 8: Academic Partnerships Framework.

3.5 Field of Study 

1.The Field of Study reflects the nature of the Programme’s curriculum and outcomes and, together with the Qualification Title, completes the Degree Title e.g. Bachelor of Science in Chemistry.
2.

A Programme may incorporate one or more Fields of Study delivered on a Major/Minor, Combined (Joint) or Triple basis according to the following rules:

Degree Title Conventions

Single: A Programme which comprises one subject or which reflects a combination of subjects presented as an integrated whole. The Degree Title should reflect the nature of the Programme curriculum and outcomes.
Combined (Joint): A Programme with an approximately equal balance between two subjects. Subjects should be listed as approved in the Programme Summary and the conjunction ‘and’ used to join the two subjects. 
Major/Minor: A major subject accounts for at most three quarters of the Programme; a minor subject accounts for at least a quarter of the Programme, using a subject ratio between 2:1 and 3:1. The major subject should be listed first and the conjunction ‘with’ used to join the two subjects. 
Triple (three subject): A Programme with an approximately equal balance between three subjects. Subjects should be listed as approved in the Programme Summary with a comma separating the first two subjects and the conjunction ‘and’ used before the third subject.
 

3.Students failing to meet the requirements of a particular Programme of Study may be eligible for an Alternative Qualification with a different Field of Study.

3.6 Academic Level 

1.Each Qualification must have an associated Academic Level which aligns with the Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies (FHEQ) and the Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area (FQ-EHEA).
2.Programmes and Modules must be developed with reference to the Level Descriptors in Section 5 of this Framework. These describe the depth and complexity of each Academic Level and outline the academic skills, amount of prior knowledge and amount of learner autonomy required to pass a Programme or Module at each Academic Level. 
3.The following table indicates the terminology associated with typical UCL Programmes; some Programmes may include a small amount of study at a higher or lower Academic Level:
Further Education 
UG Preparatory Certificate Level 3
Undergraduate 
Cert HELevel 4
Dip HELevels 4, and 5
Foundation Degree Levels 4, and 5
BachelorsLevels 4, 5, and 6
Integrated Masters Levels 4, 5, 6, and 7
Graduate 
Grad Cert Level 6
Grad DipLevel 6
Taught Postgraduate 
PG CertLevel 7
PG CertLevel 7
PGCELevel 7
PG DipLevel 7
PGDELevel 7
Taught MastersLevel 7
Postgraduate Research 
Research MastersLevel 7
DoctoratesLevel 8

3.7 Academic and Calendar Years

1.

A Programme may run over an academic year or a calendar year, defined as follows:

Academic Year

  • 1200 learning hours
  • 120 credits
  • 3 terms
  • 30 weeks
  • 40 hours per week
  • September start date

Calendar Year

  • 1800 learning hours
  • 180 credits
  • n/a (terms)
  • 48 weeks
  • 37.5 hours per week
  • September, January or April start date
2.Undergraduate, Graduate and short Taught Postgraduate Programmes should follow an Academic Year.
3.Taught Masters, Research Masters and Doctoral Programmes should follow a Calendar Year, although some Programmes of more than a year’s duration may be delivered on an Academic-year basis.
4.A Programme may include a different start date; this must be recorded in the Programme Summary.

3.8 Credit and Learning Hours 

1.Credit is awarded to a student on successful completion of the outcomes associated with a particular block of learning at a specified Academic Level, up to and including Level 7 Qualifications (Level 8 Qualifications are not credit-rated). 
2.In line with the Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies (FHEQ), one credit equates to 10 notional learning hours.
3.Credits must be converted to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) using the following ratio:
 1 FHEQ credit = 0.5 ECTS credits = 10 notional learning hours
4.A Programme of Study must meet the minimum credit requirements for the Qualification being awarded. This includes:
 a)The total amount of credit required for the Qualification
 b)The maximum amount of credit which may be taken at the lowest Academic Level 
 c)The minimum amount of credit which must be taken at the Level of the Qualification.
5.A Programme may set higher thresholds, for example where it includes a year abroad or a placement year, or where a Professional, Statutory or Regulatory Body requires it. Where this is the case, the rationale for the variable structure must be scrutinised at Programme approval and clearly defined in the individual Programme Summary.
6.The following table outlines the minimum credit requirements associated with each main group of UCL Qualifcations:
Minimum credit requirements associated with each main group of UCL Qualifcations

Qualification

FHEQ Credits

ECTS Credits

Learning Hours

Max. credit at lowest Level

Min. credit at Level of Qualification

Certificate of Higher Education

120

60

1200

120 at Level 4

120 at Level 4

Diploma of Higher Education

240

120

2400

150 at Level 4

90 at Level 5

Foundation Degree

240

120

2400

150 at Level 4

90 at Level 5

Ordinary Degree (Bachelors without Honours)

300

150

3000

150 at Level 4

60 at Level 6

Bachelors with Honours

360

180

3600

150 at Level 4

90 at Level 6

Integrated Masters with Honours

480

240

4800

150 at Level 4

120 at Level 7, 90 at Level 6

Graduate Certificate

60

30

600

15 at Level 5

45 at Level 6

Graduate Diploma

120

60

1200

30 at Level 5

90 at Level 6

Postgraduate Certificate

60

30

600

15 at Level 6

45 at Level 7

Postgraduate Diploma

120

60

1200

30 at Level 6

90 at Level 7

Taught Masters

180

90

1800

30 at Level 6

150 at Level 7

Research Masters

180

90

1800

30 at Level 6

150 at Level 7


3.9 Modes of Study

1.The Mode of Study comprises several factors: the intensity of study, the location of study (in relation to the UCL campus) and, possibly, fixed period study arrangements.
2.Each Programme will have a defined set of Modes of Study, which must be determined as part of the Programme approval/amendment process.
 

The Intensity of Study

  • Full-time: Students study for 40 hours per week over an Academic Year, or 37.5 hours per week over a Calendar Year, except during vacation periods. Additionally students retaking a year will be deemed Full-time, when retaking more than half of the activity of the year. 
  • Part-time: Students study at a structured rate per week, normally half the rate of Full-time study. Additionally students retaking a year will be deemed Part-time when retaking half or less of the activity of the year.  
  • Flexible: The number of Modules studied in a given year is determined by the student, in agreement with their Department. There will be a specified maximum time in which the student must complete. 
 

The Location of Study

  • Campus-based: Students are required to attend UCL for enrolment and some scheduled activities, such as lectures, seminars, tutorials etc. 
  • Distance Learning: Students are not required to attend UCL for enrolment nor scheduled activities. Students have access to UCL libraries, facilities and learning support. All teaching, learning and assessment activities take place away from UCL.
  • Mixed-mode: Students attend as Distance Learning and then change to Campus-based (or vice versa). This change may occur multiple times within the student’s Programme of Study, and will either be at set points within the Programme or will be determined by student Module selection.
  • Non-resident (Postgraduate Research Students only): Students study primarily away from campus, and are required to attend UCL on a limited number of occasions in order to meet their supervisor and attend the meetings for upgrade and assessment.

Note: Location of Study in this context relates to the UCL Campus(es) and not to the country in which a student is based.
Note: Distance Learning is the term used by UK government agencies. Within UCL this may be referred to in other ways, such as “non-campus”.

 

Fixed Period Study Arrangements

  • Integrated Placement or Study Abroad: Students spend a defined period of time studying in another country or undertaking a professional or industrial placement within the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification, as defined in Section 6: Threshold Qualification Requirements. See Sections 3.15 and 3.16 for further details.
  • Extra-mural/ Additional Placement or Study Abroad: Students spend an additional period of time, either on a professional or industrial placement or studying in another country. The period is taken in addition to the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification. See Sections 3.15 and 3.16 for further details.
  • Study Leave (Postgraduate Research Students only): Students can apply to spend a defined period of time away from UCL undertaking research related to their Field of Study.

3.9 Modules

1.Modules are self-contained, credit-rated blocks of learning and teaching which make up a taught Programme of Study. The Programme Summary must specify the range of Modules which students must undertake in order to achieve the Final Qualification and any Interim or Alternative Qualifications, including different Routes and Pathways.
 Non-modular Programmes
2.In exceptional circumstances, and where there is a clear pedagogic rationale, a Programme may be Non-Modular subject to approval by UCL Education Committee or its nominee. Such Programmes are subject to differential regulations with regards to Progression, Award, Classification etc., as defined in Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes.
 Credit-Weighting
3.All Modules should include a single, defined credit-weighting; students will be awarded the credit upon successful completion of the Module and the number of credits will be used to weight each Module mark in the calculation of a student’s Progression, Award and Classification.
 a)Subject to approval by UCL Education Committee or its nominee, a Module may be non-credit-bearing – for example in the case of Supplementary Modules, Placement Modules or Study Abroad Modules. 
4.On modular Undergraduate, Graduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes, Modules should carry a credit-weighting of 15, 30, 45 or 60 credits. 
 a)Undergraduate Dissertations and Masters Dissertations/ Substantive Projects may carry a higher credit-weighting e.g. 60 or 90 credits on a one-year Taught Masters or 105-150 credits on a one-year Research Masters Programme (pro-rata for longer or extended Masters Programmes).
 b)Subject to approval by UCL Education Committee or its nominee, a Programme may include larger or smaller Modules, or Modules which are not based on multiples of 15 credits. A clear rationale must be provided as differential Module sizes can limit student choice and prevent students from undertaking Modules in other Departments and Faculties
 Module Level
5.A Module must be assigned an Academic Level (e.g. Level 6) determining the difficulty of the Module, and the Marking Criteria, Marking Scale, Pass Mark and Condonable Range applicable to the Module.
6.A Module may be offered at more than one Academic Level (e.g. Level 6 or Level 7). Students may be taught in the same classroom, but the Marking Criteria, Marking Scales, Pass Marks and Condonable Ranges must be set at the correct Academic Level for each group of students.
 Module Characteristics
7.

In relation to a Programme of Study, a Module may include one or more of the following characteristics:

  • Compulsory: Modules which students must take to successfully complete a particular Programme or Route.
  • Option: Specific, limited collections of Modules from which students may choose within their Programme of Study.
  • Elective: Broad collections of Modules which may be thematically grouped, from which students may choose, and which may be from outside their main Programme of Study.
  • Supplementary: Additional, non-credit-bearing Modules e.g. synoptic or comprehensive papers, generic skills Modules etc. The marks from such Modules may be included in the degree Classification calculation.
  • Prerequisite: A specified preparatory Module which must have been successfully completed for a student to enrol on a subsequent Module. 
  • Co-requisite: A specified Module which must be taken at the same time as another Module.
  • Restricted: A Module which cannot be taken by students on specified Programmes, Routes or Pathways e.g. a Module with very similar content to one already undertaken.
  • Condonable: Condonement is the award of credit for a Module despite the Pass Mark not having been achieved, provided other certain criteria have been met. All Modules should be eligible for Condonement, The Condonable Range of marks is defined by the Qualification on which the student is enrolled. The volume of credit which may be condoned is defined by the Programme on which the student is enrolled.
  • Non-condonable: Subject to approval by Education Committee, a Module may be designated as Non-condonable if it is:
    • A Compulsory Module and/ or 
    • A Module necessary for Professional Accreditation and/ or 
    • An Undergraduate Dissertation and/ or 
    • A Masters Dissertation/ Substantive Project. 

Students must pass all Non-condonable Modules on their Programme.

8.Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes includes further details about the specific requirements for a student to pass a Module, and how Module marks are combined to determine Progression, Award and Classification.

3.11 Components

1.A Module may include one or more Components. Components may be equally weighted, or some may carry a higher weighting than others (e.g. Essay 60%, Presentation 40%). 
2.Components may be Formative or Summative; the marks from Summative Components are used to determine the overall Module mark.
3.A Component may be designated as Non-condonable i.e. the Component must be passed in order to pass the Module, for example as a requirement of Professional Accreditation. Non-condonable Components are only possible on Non-condonable Modules.
4.Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes includes further details about the assessment of Formative and Summative Components.

3.12 Taught Elements on Research Programmes

1.Non-modular Research Masters (e.g. MPhil) may include training in research methods or transferable skills which require attendance at lectures and seminars.
2.Doctorates by research (MPhil/PhD and EngD) are not modular but may include training in research methods or transferable skills which require attendance at lectures and seminars.
3.Professional Doctorates are not modular but typically include a taught element, a research element and practicum assignments and assessments. Students must demonstrate satisfactory attendance and performance in each element.

3.13 Progression and Continuation 

 Progression on Undergraduate Programmes
1.Progression applies to Undergraduate Programmes running over multiple Academic Years and multiple Academic Levels. Taught Postgraduate and Graduate Programmes must not include Progression Requirements.
2.Progression is typically defined as the successful completion of one Academic Level and approval to commence the next Academic Level. However, as UCL’s Undergraduate Programmes do not necessarily include a direct correlation between Academic Years and Academic Levels, in practice ‘Progression’ is determined at the end of each Academic Year.
3.A student must meet minimum standards in order to Progress to the next Academic Year; UCL’s threshold requirements are set out in Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes. Any specialist requirements for an individual Programme over and above these thresholds must be approved by UCL Education Committee or its nominee, and be clearly defined in the Programme Summary.
 Continuation on Taught Postgraduate and Graduate Programmes
4.Continuation applies to some Taught Postgraduate and Graduate Programmes which run over multiple Academic or Calendar Years. Programmes are not obliged to include Continuation Requirements.
5.Continuation is defined as approval to commence a subsequent year of study at the same Academic Level. 
6.Programmes may include Continuation Requirements which define the threshold academic standards which a student must meet in order to continue to the next year. Continuation Requirements are defined at Programme Level. They must be approved by UCL Education Committee or its nominee, and be clearly defined in the Programme Summary.
7.It should be noted that some Taught Postgraduate and Graduate Programmes allow students to undertake a small number of credits at a higher or lower Academic Level. Such Programmes do not include Progression Requirements between these Academic Levels.

3.14 Interim Qualifications 

1.An approved Programme of Study may include one or more Interim Qualifications to recognise the achievements of any students unable to complete the intended Final Qualification.
2.Details of the minimum credit and Level requirements for each Interim Qualification are specified in the Threshold Qualification Requirements.
3.The criteria for the award of an Interim Qualification are defined in Chapter 4, Section 12: Interim Qualifications, and Chapter 5: Research Degrees Framework.
 Advertised Outcomes
4.An Interim Qualification is defined as an ‘Advertised Outcome’ where there are discretely-defined, Programme-specific Interim Qualification Learning Outcomes which are published in the Programme Summary. The Board of Examiners must assess the student’s eligibility for the Interim Qualification against these Learning Outcomes. On Graduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes, an Interim Qualification which is an Advertised Outcome is eligible for a Classification.
5.Where an Interim Qualification is not an Advertised Outcome of the Programme, the Board of Examiners must assess the student’s eligibility for the Interim Qualification against the standard UCL Interim Qualification Learning Outcomes defined in Chapter 4, Section 12: Interim Qualifications. On Graduate and Taught Postgraduate Programmes, an Interim Qualification which is not an Advertised Outcome is not eligible for a Classification.
 Interim Qualifications available in Programme Design
6.The Interim Qualifications in place on a given Programme are defined in the Programme Summary. Not all Programmes include Interim Qualifications. Interim Qualifications are not awarded automatically, nor are they a student entitlement. The following Interim Qualifications may be considered as part of the Programme Approval process:
Interim Qualifications which may be considered as part of the Programme Approval process

Final Qualification

Available Interim Qualifications

All

Qualification with Alternate Field of Study

Aegrotat Degree

Certificate of Higher Education

-

Diploma of Higher Education

Cert HE

Foundation Degree

Cert HE

Bachelors with Honours Degree

Ordinary Degree (Bachelors without Honours)

Dip HE

Cert HE

Integrated Masters with Honours Degree

Honours Degree

Ordinary Degree (Bachelors without Honours)

Dip HE

Cert HE

Graduate Certificate

-

Graduate Diploma

Grad Cert

Postgraduate Certificate

-

Postgraduate Certificate in Education

PG Cert

Grad Cert

Postgraduate Diploma

PG Cert

Postgraduate Diploma in Education

PG Cert

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)

Taught Masters

PG Dip

PG Cert

Research Masters

PG Dip

PG Cert

Doctor of Philosophy

MPhil


3.15 Industrial Placements

1.A Programme may include a defined period of time on a professional or industrial Placement.
2.The Placement must be spent attached to an organisation or institution approved by the Department/Division on behalf of UCL as having a function relevant and suitable to the student’s Field of Study.
3. plan of work must be agreed by the Departmental/Divisional Tutor and be supervised by the student’s tutor.
4.Students must register the name and contact details of an Industrial Supervisor with their Departmental/Divisional Tutor.
 Qualification Requirements and Programme Requirements
5.When designing a Programme, Departments/ Divisions must ensure that the Programme Structure meets Threshold Qualification Requirements in Section 6. These set out the minimum Credit and Academic Level requirements for UCL to be able to award a particular Qualification, but many UCL Programmes exceed these thresholds. Once the Programme Structure is formally approved by UCL, students must meet all of the Programme Requirements as defined in the Programme Summary, even if these are in excess of the UCL’s Threshold Qualification Requirements. 
6.The following sections set out the options open to Departments/ Divisions when designing a Programme. Each decision must be recorded in the Programme Summary.
 Programme Structure
7.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide whether the student will be awarded additional credits for successful completion of the Placement, from the following options:

  • Additional Placement (also known as an ‘Extra-Mural’ or ‘Sandwich’): The Programme Structure includes one module or one academic year of Placement activity over and above the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification. The student is awarded additional credit for successful completion of the Placement.
    • Example: An Integrated Masters with Honours must include a minimum of 480 credits. The Programme Structure requires students to undertake an additional year (120 credits) of Placement activity. On successful completion of the Programme, the student is awarded 600 credits.
  • Integrated Placement: The Programme Structure includes one module or one academic year of Placement activity within the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification. The student is not awarded additional credit for successful completion of the Placement.
    • Example: An Integrated Masters with Honours must include a minimum of 480 credits. A Placement is considered integral to the Threshold Qualification Requirements if it is part of these 480 credits.
 Timing of the Placement
8.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide when the Placement will take place from the following options:

  • Undergraduate Placement Year: Students spend one academic year on Placement. The Placement usually takes place in the penultimate year of the Programme but may take place in any year but the first year.
  • Undergraduate Placement Module: Students spend one module on Placement. The Placement may take place in any year.
  • Graduate or Taught Postgraduate Placement Module: Students spend some of their taught modules on Placement.
 Compulsory and Optional Placements
9.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide whether the Placement is Compulsory or Optional from the following options:

  • Compulsory Placement: Students must undertake the Placement in order to satisfy the Programme Requirements and be awarded a Qualification with a particular Field of Study.
  • Optional Placement: Students are offered the opportunity to undertake a Placement as part of their Programme, but they may elect not to and still meet the Programme Requirements.
 Assessment of Placements
10.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide how the Placement will be assessed from the following options:

  • Standard Assessment: All Integrated Placement Years or Modules must be assessed according to the standard UCL regulations and carry the standard credit-weighting in the calculation of the Classification.
  • Assessment of the Placement itself: On Additional Placement Years or Modules, students should be awarded credits for successful completion of the Placement Module/Year, however these credits must be weighted at 0 in the calculation of the Classification.
  • Assessment via an Additional 30-credit Project Module: Alternatively, an Additional Placement Year may be assessed via a 30-credit Project Module. Students receive credit for successful completion of the Project Module but not the Placement Year itself. The Project Module must be weighted at 0 in the calculation of the Classification. Project Modules are usually ‘Non-Condonable’.
 Consequences of Failing a Placement
11.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division should decide the consequences of failing the Placement from the following options:

  • Failure of an Integrated Placement: On Integrated Placements, the standard UCL Progression and Award Requirements apply and students must therefore pass, or be formally condoned in, all Placement Modules and/ or Years (see Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes). Where a student fails to meet these requirements after all permitted attempts, they will be required to leave the Programme. Students may be eligible for an Interim Qualification such as a Cert HE or Dip HE.
  • Failure of an Additional Placement Module: Where a student fails an Additional, Optional Placement Module but meets all the other Programme Requirements, they should still be eligible for the award of the same Qualification (Bachelors, Integrated Masters etc.). The Department/ Division must determine whether this will be with the same Field of Study or with an Alternative Field of Study, and document this in the Programme Summary.
  • Failure of an Additional Placement Year: Where a student fails or withdraws from an Additional, Optional Placement Year but meets all the other Programme Requirements, they should still be eligible for the award of the same Qualification (Bachelors, Integrated Masters etc.). The Qualification may be awarded in one of the following ways
    • The Department/ Division may decide that the student will be eligible for the same Qualification with the same Field of Study. 
    • The Department/ Division may allow a student to transfer to a cognate Programme without a Placement Requirement. For example, if a student on “MSci Geophysical Sciences with a Year in Industry” fails a Placement in Year 3, they may be transferred from to “MSci Geophysical Sciences” to complete their degree. 
    • The Department/ Division may incorporate an Exit Qualification with an Alternate Field of Study into the Programme, with an associated Programme Diet. For example, if a student fails the Placement element of “MSci Biological Sciences”, they may be eligible for the award of “MSci Biological Studies”.

In all cases, the Programme Requirements/ Diet must be agreed as part of the Programme Design process and recorded in the Programme Summary.


3.16 Study Abroad 

1.A Programme may include one term or one academic year of study at an overseas Higher Education institution approved by UCL.
 Qualification Requirements and Programme Requirements
2.When designing a Programme, Departments/ Divisions must ensure that the Programme Structure meets Threshold Qualification Requirements in Section 6. These set out the minimum Credit and Academic Level requirements for UCL to be able to award a particular Qualification, but many UCL Programmes exceed these thresholds. Once the Programme Structure is formally approved by UCL, students must meet all of the Programme Requirements as defined in the Programme Summary, even if these are in excess of the UCL’s Threshold Qualification Requirements.
3.The following sections set out the options open to Departments/ Divisions when designing a Programme. Each decision must be recorded in the Programme Summary.
 Programme Structure
4.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide whether the student will be awarded additional credits for successful completion of the Study Abroad, from the following options:

  • Additional Study Abroad Year (also known as an ‘Extra-Mural’ or ‘Sandwich’): An Undergraduate Programme Structure may include one academic year (nine months) of Study Abroad over and above the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification. The student is awarded additional credit for successful completion of the Study Abroad.
    • Example: A Bachelors with Honours must include a minimum of 360 credits. The Programme Structure requires students to undertake an additional year (120 credits) of Study Abroad. On successful completion of the Programme, the student is awarded 480 credits.
  • Integrated Study Abroad: The Programme Structure includes one module or one term of Study Abroad within the minimum number of credits needed to complete the UCL Qualification. The student is not awarded additional credit for successful completion of the Study Abroad.
    • Example: A Bachelors with Honours must include a minimum of 360 credits. Study Abroad is considered integral to the Threshold Qualification Requirements if it is part of these 360 credits.
 Timing of the Study Abroad
5.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide when the Study Abroad will take place from the following options:

  • Undergraduate Study Abroad Year: Students spend one academic year (nine months) studying abroad. The Study Abroad usually takes place in the penultimate year of the Programme but may take place in any year but the first year.
  • Study Abroad Module or Term: Students spend one module or one term studying abroad. The Study Abroad may take place in any year.
 Compulsory and Optional Study Abroad
6.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide whether the Study Abroad is Compulsory or Optional from the following options:

  • Compulsory Study Abroad: Students must undertake the Study Abroad in order to satisfy the Programme Requirements and be awarded a Qualification with a particular Field of Study.
  • Optional Study Abroad: Students are offered the opportunity to undertake Study Abroad as part of their Programme, but they may elect not to and still meet the Programme Requirements.
 Assessment of Study Abroad
7.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide how the Study Abroad will be assessed from the following options:

  • Standard Assessment: All Integrated Study Abroad Years or Modules must be assessed according to the standard UCL regulations and carry the standard credit-weighting in the calculation of the Classification.
  • Assessment of the Study Abroad itself: On Additional Study Abroad Years or Modules students should be awarded credits for successful completion of the Study Abroad Module/Year, however these credits must be weighted at 0 in the calculation of the Classification.
  • Assessment via an Additional 30-credit Project Module: Alternatively, an Additional Study Abroad Year may be assessed via a 30-credit Project Module. Students receive credit for successful completion of the Project Module but not the Study Abroad Year itself. The Project Module must be weighted at 0 in the calculation of the Classification.
 Consequences of Failing a Study Abroad Requirement
8.

At the point of Programme Design, the Department/ Division must decide the consequences of failing the Study Abroad from the following options:

  • Failure of Integrated Study Abroad: On programmes with an Integrated Study Abroad Module or Year, the standard UCL Progression and Award Requirements apply and students must therefore pass, or be formally condoned in, all Study Abroad Modules and/ or Years (see Chapter 4: Assessment Framework for Taught Programmes). Where a student fails to meet these requirements after all permitted attempts, they will be required to leave the Programme. Students may be eligible for an Interim Qualification such as a Cert HE or Dip HE.
  • Failure of an Additional Study Abroad Module: Where a student fails an Additional Study Abroad Module but meets all the other Programme Requirements, they should still be eligible for the award of the same Qualification (Bachelors, Integrated Masters etc.). The Department/ Division must determine whether this will be with the same Field of Study or with an Alternative Field of Study, and document this in the Programme Summary.
  • Failure of an Additional Study Abroad Year: Where a student fails or withdraws from an Additional Study Abroad Year but meets all the other Programme Requirements, they should still be eligible for the award of the same Qualification (Bachelors, Integrated Masters etc.). The Qualification may be awarded in one of the following ways
    • The Department/ Division may decide that the student will be eligible for the same Qualification with the same Field of Study. 
    • The Department/ Division may allow a student to transfer to a cognate Programme without a Study Abroad Requirement. For example, if a student on “BA Music with a Year Abroad” fails a Study Abroad Year in Year 3, they may be transferred to “BA Music” to complete their degree. 
    • The Department/ Division may incorporate an Exit Qualification with an Alternate Field of Study into the Programme, with an associated Programme Diet. For example, if a student fails the Study Abroad element of “BA Music”, they may be eligible for the award of “BA Music Studies”.

In all cases, the Programme Requirements/ Diet must be agreed as part of the Programme Design process and recorded in the Programme Summary.