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Jason Davies, SFHEA
V
Intellectual Wanderings
 
 
UCL Arena Centre for Advancing Research-Based Education (formerly CALT)
1-19 Torrington Place
London WC1E 6BT
+44 (0)20 3108 6457 (int 56457)
Twitter: @JasonPtrDavies
Senior Teaching Fellow (attached to UCL Institute of Education)
*
Having researched and taught in several departments at UCL and occasionally beyond, I have been in the UCL Arena Centre for Research-based Education (formerly CALT) since 2003. I work particularly with the UCL Institute of Education after several years of working with BEAMS (Faculties of Engineering, Maths and Physical Sciences and the Bartlett School of Architecture) to explore teaching and learning of all kinds.
With a background in ancient languages, history, history of religion and medicine, I moved into interdisciplinarity and higher education as my fields of study and teaching, which shows in my predominantly reflexive approach, with an emphasis on supporting disciplinary integrity.
Keywords: interdisciplinarity, disciplinarity, teaching and learning, reflective practice, threshold concepts, academic practice
 
 
Recent Talks
V
Learning, Cultural Theory, Threshold Concepts
 
 
*
2018 June 'Intersectionality, Research-based Education, and Assessment: A Pan-Curricular Threshold Concept', 7th Biennial Threshold Concepts conference, Miami University, Oxford Ohio
 
 
 
*
2018 'Disabling Grief', Ableism in Academia, UCL Institute of Education (livestream of day)
 
 
 
*
2017 December 'The Necessary Narcissism of The Academic Disciplines',
Conference on Narcissism, Institute of Advanced Study, UCL
 
 
 
*
2016 July ‘Mary Douglas’s Cultural Theory: Learning and the Ends of Inquiry’, Improving University Teaching | Conference Program
 
 
 
*
2016 June 'Thresholding Ancient Religion': a trifold approach, 6th Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference, Dalhousie University
 
 
Publications
V
History, Interdisciplinarity, Education; monograph, chapters, articles
 
 
 
>
Monograph
 
 
 
 
 
 
V
Edited collection
 
 
 
*
2018 (eds Davies & Pachlern) Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Perspectives from UCL (open access pdf), UCL IOE Press
 
 
 
V
Chapters/articles/pieces
 
 
 
*
(forthcoming 2018) ' Whose Dream Is It Anyway? Navigating the Significance of Dreams in the Ancient World' in Divine Interventions? Reassessing Ancient Divination (ed Lindsay Driediger-Murphy and Esther Eidinow)
 
 
 
*
(forthcoming 2018) 'The Value(s) of Belief: Ancient Religion, Cognitive Science and Interdisciplinarity' in Theorizing Ancient Religion (ed Nickolas P. Roubekas), Equinox Press
 
 
 
*
2018 'Threshold Concepts as Pathways Through Ancient Religion: Curriculum as Initiation', Threshold Concepts on the Edge (ed. Land et al)
 
 
 
*
2016 'Threshold Guardians': Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Discipline: chapter in Land, R., Meyer J.H.F. and Flanagan, M.T, (Eds) Threshold Concepts in Practice. Rotterdam, Taipei & Boston: Sense Publishers, 121-134
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2012-? 'Discipline and Belief' in a collected volume for CUP that has not so far appeared, but I won't embarrass the overworked editor here...
 
 
 
*
2011 'Believing the Evidence' in Evidence, Inference and Enquiry, (Proceedings of the British Academy 171, eds. Dawid, Twining, Vasilaki, Oxford University Press), 395-434
 
 
 
*
2011 'Disciplining the Disciplines' in Evidence, Inference and Enquiry, (Proceedings of the British Academy 171, eds. Dawid, Twining, Vasilaki, Oxford University Press), 37-72
 
 
 
*
2009 'Religion in Ancient Historiography', in the Cambridge Companion to the Roman Historians (ed. Dr Andrew Feldherr), 166-180
 
 
 
*
2009 'The messiness of academics 'speaking across the disciplines'' in Collaborative Working in Higher Education: The Social Academy (eds. L. Walsh and P. Kahn, Routledge), 111-118
 
 
 
>
Peer Review
 
 
 
*
I have undertaken anonymous peer review in higher education for journals, conference submissions and grant councils but it's anonymous.
 
 
 
*
2015 September 'Threshold Concepts and Teaching Ancient Religion' Teaching and Learning Ancient Religion Network, Senate House (London)
 
 
Current Projects
 
 
 
*
UCL Arena course tutor (Arena 1, Arena 2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Overseer of UCL Provost's Teaching Awards (2015-2017)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
This will be fun. Just setting up the email list...
 
 
 
>
Collation of archives from the Evidence, Inference and Enquiry Programme
 
 
 
*
Still waiting for UCL to get back to me about the archived...
 
 
Employment and Recognition
>
Education, academic practice, SFHEA, interdisciplinarity, ancient history
 
 
 
*
2007-Present: Senior Teaching Fellow, CALT, UCL
 
 
 
*
Senior Fellow, Higher Education Academy
 
 
 
>
2003-07 Research Fellow, jointly in:
 
 
 
*
Leverhulme & ESRC-funded Interdisciplinary Programme on Evidence, Inference and Enquiry at UCL (History & Interdisciplinary Projects)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2000-03 Post-doctoral Fellow:Wellcome Trust for the History of Medicine at UCL (Affiliate Fellow 2003-7)
 
 
Education
>
1994-98 PhD: History, UCL
 
 
 
*
1992-93 M.A. Classics: Greek & Latin, UCL
 
 
 
*
1988-91 B.A. (Hons): Classical Studies (Major Greek), University of Reading (First Class)
 
 
Grants
>
UCL Graduate School, Research funds
 
 
 
*
2008-14 Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence, UCL Graduate School
 
 
 
*
2003-07 Research Fellowship in Leverhulme/ESRC-funded interdisciplinary project 'Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence' at UCL
 
 
 
*
2000-2003 Wellcome Trust Postdoctoral Fellowship
 
 
 
*
British Academy PhD Scholarship 1994-7
 
 
 
*
British Academy MA Scholarship 1992-3
 
 
Formal and QA roles
>
Director UCL Arena, MA Programme leadership, Graduate Tutor, Chair BoE, national rep, European project, SRHE network convenorship, ESRC rapporteur
 
 
 
V
Institutional
 
 
 
*
Organiser UCL Teaching and Learning Conference 2016 and 2015
 
 
 
*
and of UCL Provost's Teaching Awards, 2015-
 
 
 
*
Interim Director UCL Arena, 2017-
 
 
 
V
Departmental
 
 
 
*
2008-13 Departmental Graduate Tutor
 
 
 
*
2008-present MA Education Programme Leader (also with responsibility for MA Academic Practice, Adult Learning and Professional Development; deputy 2007)
 
 
 
*
2010-present Chair, Combined Postgraduate Board of Examiners (deputy 2007-10)
 
 
 
V
National
 
 
 
V
External examiner
 
 
 
>
2008-12 Glasgow University's School of Interdisciplinary Studies MA Liberal Arts
 
 
 
*
2010-2012 Text and Communication (year 1)
 
 
 
*
2008-2012 Creative Enquiry Project (year 4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Rapporteur
 
 
 
*
I have served as a rapporteur for the ESRC for a project on Technology-enhanced interdisciplinary learning.
 
 
 
>
National Rep
 
 
 
*
As of 2012, I am the National Representative for UALL - The Universities Association for Lifelong Learning in Higher Education at the European Association for Lifelong Learning (EUCEN)
 
 
 
*
2013- Co-convenor Society for Research into Higher Education Academic Practice Network
 
 
 
>
European
 
 
 
*
I was a partner on the IMPLEMENT (2010-2012) for UCL, which focuses on embedding lifelong learning in universities.
 
 
Teaching
>
PhD, MA, MRes, BASc: Education, Interdisciplnarity, Classics, Ancient History, History of Science
 
 
 
>
PhD
 
 
 
*
external examiner for Robert Blake: Revisiting the writing process in the digital age: the writing practices and processes of science and technology undergraduates at Lancaster University
 
 
 
*
second supervisor Adrian Chapman 'The Mutual Audience: A New Model of Audience in Student Writing at University' (2013)
 
 
 
>
60 credits MA Dissertations
 
V
Various dissertations supervised, organised and administered 2005-2014 in MAs
 
 
*
Adult Learning & Professional Development
 
 
 
*
Academic Practice
 
 
 
*
Education
 
 
 
>
Titles include:
 
 
 
*
Can Critical Thinking Skills Be Taught and Assessed? An Exploratory Investigation into a Critical Thinking Training Programme
 
 
 
*
The Impact of Students' Learning Styles on Learning Outcomes and Student Satisfaction in Traditional and Blended Learning
 
 
 
*
District Nurse Education: a study to explore options to provide the skills, knowledge and competence required
 
 
 
*
The Establishment and Use of Significant Event Analysis (SEA) for General Practitioners
 
 
 
>
30 credits M-level
 
 
 
>
Higher Education and Academic Identity aimed at facilitating established and senior lecturers' explorations of interdisciplinarity and academic identity.
 
 
 
*
Practical Learning Environments an exploration (despite the title) of virtual and cultural environments as a locus for teaching.
 
 
 
*
Exploring Learning and Higher Education (as course tutor) – aimed at probationary lecturers in HE, taking a reflexive approach to the nature of teaching to assist participants to develop their approach to teaching their discipline.
 
 
 
>
15 credits M-level
 
 
 
*
Policy and Perspectives in Adult Education the long view on adult education: grounded in historical surveys, participants nominate an area of relevance and interest for their essays.
 
 
 
*
Investigating Research is a 'transferable skills' module offered to MRes students across UCL across more than ten disciplines. It draws heavily on history of science and medicine. The course has participants reflect on the role of research within society (eg engagement with the public and other stakeholders, ethics and research, actor-network theory, policy issues, interdisciplinarity and trans-institutional working).
 
 
 
*
Researching Practice where participants undertake an iterative research project into their practice.
 
 
 
*
Reflective Practice: Theory and Practice exploring and cultivating the reflexive (habitually reflective) practitioner.
 
 
 
*
Directed Reading (as supervisor) involved 'distance' supervision of literature review on a negotiated topic.
 
 
 
*
Quality, Consistency and Cost-Effectiveness explores the understanding and deployment of elegant curriculum design with a deliberate focus on maintaining standards within constraints, drawing on a variety of discourses (particularly ethics and professionalism).
 
 
 
>
Programme Leadership
 
 
 
*
As course director 2008-2014, I oversaw all aspects of enrolment, registration and pastoral care including designing progression frameworks and co-ordinated dissertation supervision.
 
 
 
>
Non-credit bearing teaching
 
 
 
>
PGTA Orientation
 
 
 
*
From 2013 I have repeatedly presented our Introduction to Teaching in Higher Education to PGTAs in the school of BEAMS and set up the companion Moodle site.
 
 
 
*
2007-12 Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence is a non credit-bearing UCL Graduate School course which I organise and have taught on for several years. Participants are introduced to essential methodologies and approaches to evidence from a wide range of disciplines (Anthropology, Economics, Statistics, Astronomy, Fine Art, Law, Archaeology and History were offered recently).
 
 
 
*
I generally offer the opening session on Disciplinarity and a closing one on Interdisciplinarity to link the different fields presented, as well as offering the History session myself. The last is built around the ancient world and the variety of approaches to evidence in Roman literature, religion and medicine.
 
 
 
>
Undergraduate
 
V
During my PhD and for some time afterwards, I built a broad portfolio of classical courses in a number of universities: though my specialisms were Roman religion and historiography, I also taught both languages regularly as well as broader courses on literature and culture in both the Greek and the Roman spheres.
 
 
*
1996 Birkbeck Other People in Greek & Roman Thought (with Dr E. Curti)
 
 
 
*
2000-01 UCL (History) The Romans and Their Past
 
 
 
*
1999 Bristol University Literary Sources for Greek and Roman History (with Mr E. McQueen)
 
 
 
*
1999-00 Birkbeck Roman Religion
 
 
 
>
1995-97 PG Teaching Assistant for UCL (History):
 
 
 
*
The Roman Empire from Augustus to Theodosius
 
 
 
*
Reading Historians & Concepts and Categories;
 
 
 
*
1998 Exeter University Latin Literature and Texts (Tacitus Annals 4)
 
 
 
*
2000 & 2001 UCL (History) Religious Conversion in Late Antiquity
 
 
 
*
1998 Birkbeck Augustan Rome (with Dr Emmanuele Curti)
 
 
*
1995-2000 A level marker for JACT Classical Civilisations
 
 
 
*
2000-01 Birkbeck Beginners' Greek
 
 
 
*
1998-00 Birkbeck Study Skills
 
 
 
*
1997-98 Birkbeck Latin Literature – Tacitus Annals 4 & 14
 
 
 
*
1998-00 City Literary Institute (for Birkbeck) Beginners' Latin
 
 
 
*
2012- Postmodernism, Genre and Discipline as part of UCL BASc foundation year
 
 
 
*
1996-00 Summer School in Classics (KCL/UCL; Latin and Greek, all levels)
 
 
 
*
2006-7 BA interdisciplinary dissertation joint supervision in UCL (Anthropology), 'Evidence and Medical Concepts' for Human Sciences Seminar Project (ancient and modern medicine)
 
 
 
*
1997-99 UCL (Greek & Latin) Beginners' Greek
 
 
 
*
2000 UCL (Greek & Latin) Latin Unseens
 
 
Talks, Presentations and Research Seminars
V
Series chair; interdisciplinarity, education, digital literacy, postmodernism, literature, history
 
 
 
>
Chair/Organiser
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Individual Talks
 
 
 
*
2014 May 'Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Disciplines' UCL Teaching and Learning Exchange
 
 
 
*
2014 April 'Teaching and Learning Ancient Religion roundtable' (with Esther Eidinow and Susan Deacy) Classical Association 2014
 
 
 
*
2012 June 'Locked Doors: Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Disciplines' Biennial Thresholds Conference, NAIRTL, Trinity College Dublin
 
 
 
*
2012 May Workshop on Curriculum in Partnership for IMPLEMENT project, University of Graz, Austra
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2010 Nov 'Inferring the obvious: belief and other unrepresentables', Corpus Christi Classical Seminar, Oxford
 
 
 
*
2010 Apr '"Living on the ceiling": how and why interdisciplinarity turns everything upside down', Society for Research into Higher Education Academic Practice Network on The challenges of collaborative work in the academy
 
 
 
*
2010 July 'Professional Doctorates: a symposium' (with Sue Cross) Teaching and Learning Conference, UCL
 
 
 
*
2008 Oct "'Gloves off'': ''religion'', ''belief'' and discourse – a polemic on deprecating Cicero's De Diuinatione', St Andrews Research Seminar
 
 
 
*
2008 July 'Thinking Inside the Box: Disciplinarity, culture, -isms, problems/solutions and Education', Critical Realism and Education, Institute of Education
 
 
 
*
2008 Apr 'Interdisciplinarity & Teaching: After the Leverhulme Evidence Project', Teaching and Learning Conference, UCL
 
 
 
*
2007 May 'Believing in Ancient Rome', Symposium on ancient religion, St Paul's Cathedral study group
 
 
 
*
2007 Dec 'Evidence: a Case Study of Interdisciplinarity', Evidence Satellite Conference', UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2007 Dec '''Not like Us"; the real problem with old alterity', Evidence Satellite Conference', UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2006 Feb 'Belief, Dreams and Managing Significance', Colloquium on Roman Religion, Erfurt (Germany)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2005 Dec 'How to use a wiki ', UCL (general audience)
 
 
 
*
2004 Oct 'The Trouble With Prediction', Evidence Programme, UCL
 
 
 
*
2004 Nov 'Interdisciplinarity' (with Stephen Rowland), Evidence Programme, UCL
 
 
 
*
2004 June 'The Risks the Romans Ran', Provost's Dinner, UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2003 Mar 'Medicine and Magic in the Roman Empire: the Evidence of Galen', Classical Association, Warwick
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2002 Nov 'Whose Dream is it Anyway? (part II)', University of Reading Seminar
 
 
 
*
2002 Dec 'Whose Dream is it Anyway? (part III)', The Dream and the Sciences of the Human, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL/Warburg Institute
 
 
 
*
2001 Mar 'Why One Should Not Read Livy', London Association of Classical Teachers (A level audience)
 
 
 
*
1999 May 'Suicide in Livy and Tacitus', UCL Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Suicide
 
 
 
*
1998 Nov 'Ammianus Marcellinus and the End of Expiation' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1998 Mar 'The Historian and the Incredible: Livy and Tacitus on Religious Crisis', European Social Science and History Conference, Amsterdam
 
 
 
*
1997 Nov 'multa alia ludibria nuntiata : did Livy believe in prodigies?' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1997 Jan 'Religious Codes in Roman Annalistic History' (Oxford Classics PG Series)
 
 
 
*
1997 Feb 'The Gods of War: or why the Romans were always right' (Oxford/London PG Colloquium, Institute of Classical Studies)
 
 
 
*
1996 Oct 'Talking about the Gods of the Past: the Case of Tacitus' (Institute of Classical Studies Ancient History Seminars)
 
 
 
*
1996 Nov 'The Religious Experience of (Some) Ancient Peoples' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1996 Mar 'Reasons to be Cheerful: Tacitus on the gods', Loxbridge, London
 
 
 
*
1995 Oct 'Orthodox Miracles: the Appropriation of Religious Charisma in Tacitus' Histories ', (South of England & Wales Postgraduate Series): also presented later at Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar
 
 
 
*
1993 Nov 'Underground ''christians'' in Pagan Rome: Analysing the Underground Basilica of the Porta Maggiora' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
Book Reviews
>
Classics, ancient history, ancient science
 
 
 
*
G. Forsythe (2010) Time in Roman religion: one thousand years of religious history, (Routledge studies in ancient history; 4.) Journal of Roman Studies forthcoming
 
 
 
*
M. Lipka (2009) Roman Gods: A Conceptual Approach (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 167). Leiden/Boston: Brill, Journal of Roman Studies 101 (2011), 257-8
 
 
 
*
J. Scheid (2005) 'Quand faire, c'est croire. Les rites sacrificiels des romains', (Paris), Classical Review (2008), 58
 
 
 
*
Green C.M.C. Roman Religion and the cult of Diana at Aricia (2007) and C.E. Schultz, and Paul B. Harvey jr (2007) Religion in Republican Italy (CUP), Journal of Roman Studies 99, (2009), 245-7
 
 
 
*
M.-L. Haack Les Haruspices dans le monde romain (Pessac, 2003), Journal of Roman Studies 97 (2007), 283-4
 
 
 
*
B. Näf (2004) Traum und Traumdeutung im Altertum (Darmstadt), Classical Review
 
 
 
*
G. Hart (2000) Asclepius, the god of medicine, (London), Medical History 47 (3) (July 2003)
 
 
 
*
I. Gradel (2002) Emperor Worship and Roman Religion (Oxford), JACT Review 33 (Summer 2003)
 
 
 
*
R. Valantasis (ed.) (2000) Religions of Late Antiquity in Practice (Oxford), Journal of Roman Studies 93 (2003)
 
 
 
*
H.-F. Mueller (2002) Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (Routledge), Journal of Roman Studies 93 (2003)
 
 
 
*
H. W. Benario (ed. & tr.) (1999) Tacitus' 'Germany' (Warminster) & J. B. Rives (ed. & tr.) (1999) Tacitus' Germania (Oxford), Phoenix 2001.4
 
 
 
*
J. A. North (2000) Roman Religion (Oxford: Greece and Rome New Surveys in the Classics 30), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
E. Craik (2000) Hippocrates: Places in Man (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
T. E. H. Harrison (2000) Divinity and History: the Religion of Herodotus (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
J. Gould (2001) Myth, Ritual Memory, and Exchange: Essays in Greek Literature and Culture (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
K. Dowden (2000) European Paganism: the Realities of Cult from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (London & NY), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
G. E. R. Lloyd (1999) Science, Folklore and Ideology: Studies in the Life Sciences in Ancient Greece (Bristol: reissue of 1983 edition by Cambridge University Press), JACT Review 29 (Summer 2001)
 
 
 
*
J. F. Healy (1999) Pliny The Elder on Science and Technology (Oxford), JACT Review 29 (Summer 2001)
 
 
 
*
M. Edwards, M. Goodman & S. Price (eds) (1999) Apologetics in the Roman Empire (Oxford), BMCR 00.07.07
 
 
 
*
R. Ash (1999) Ordering Anarchy: Armies and Leaders in Tacitus' Histories (London), BMCR 00.05.21
 
 
 
*
V. Rosenberger (1998) Gezähmte Götter: Das Prodigienwesen der römischen Republik (Stuttgart 1998), Journal of Roman Studies 90 (2000)
 
 
 
*
D. Felton (1999) Haunted Greece and Rome: Ghost Stories from Classical Antiquity (Austin, Texas), Journal of Roman Studies 90 (2000)
 
 
 
*
N. Morley (1999) Writing Ancient History (London), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
M. Grant (1999) The Collapse and Recovery of the Roman Empire (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
R. Miles (1999) Constructing Identities in Late Antiquity (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000);
 
 
 
*
B. Levick (1999) Vespasian (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
R. Mellor (1999) The Roman Historians (London & New York), BMCR 99.6.24
 
 
 
*
A. J. Woodman (1998) Tacitus Reviewed (Oxford), BMCR 99.7.22
 
 
 
*
T. P. Wiseman (1998) Roman Drama and Roman History (Exeter), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
A. Feldherr (1998) Spectacle and Society in Livy's History (Berkeley, Los Angeles, London), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
F. Graf (1997) Magic in the Ancient World (Cambridge Mass.), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
E. Orlin (1997) Temples, Politics and Religion in Republican Rome (Leiden), BMCR 99.1.11
 
 
 
*
J. Rabinowitz (1998) The Rotting Witch (New York), BMCR 98.5.11
 
 
 
*
T. Habinek & A. Schiesaro (eds) (1997) The Roman Cultural Revolution (Cambridge), JACT Review 1998
 
 
 
*
W. Hansen (ed.) (1996) The Amazing Stories of Phlegon of Tralles (Exeter), BMCR 97.5.8
 
 
 
*
P. G. Walsh (1996) Livy XL (Warminster), BMCR 96.12.13
 
 
Digital Literacy (Apple only)
>
Outliners, plain text, (multi)markdown, LaTeX, emailers, everything's a project
 
 
 
*
This section is a bit more rambling but basically summarises a few workflows for managing all that stuff. It's taken twenty years to get the hang of it so it seemed worth mentioning.
 
 
 
>
Plain text and mark-up
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2) Beautiful typeset output
 
 
 
*
3) Initially steep learning curve, briefly, then a level plane, unlike Word with shallow start followed by almost vertical learning curve that never seems to end.
 
 
 
*
1) internally consistent files (you waste so much time fighting Word and you don't even know it).
 
 
 
>
Why is plain text so important?
 
 
 
>
Plain text formats are much much easier to troubleshoot and share (if you can persuade your colleagues to make their lives better).
 
 
 
*
'Track Changes' I hear you cry but it's nothing compared to eg BBEdit 'compare front documents'. Honest.
 
 
 
*
Plain text can be edited on just about anything and creates tiny files in comparison to eg Word: easy to sync, hard to corrupt, quick to move around, transparent to those who can read them (ie everyone).
 
 
 
>
Everything that really matters and has real power is built on plain text. Plain text is where almost everything that is interesting actually happens. Nothing happens without it.
 
 
 
*
Videos and pictures are not included but what is included in that statement is making those things available, eg through html.
 
 
 
>
Plain text forces you to think things through.
 
 
 
*
In LaTeX or html, you have to tell it that "section 1" is a section, as opposed to the fairly typical practice with Word of randomly applying styles where by section 7 you can't remember if it was 16 Times New Roman or 15 Palatino.
 
 
 
*
Mac: one text-editor to rule them all – BBEdit
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Multimarkdown lets you go between plain-text, opml (outliner), formatted text (rtf, doc, LaTeX, html).
 
 
 
*
iOS: plenty to choose from, I choose Textastic (iPad and iPhone)
 
 
 
>
Outlining and projects
 
 
 
*
Multimarkdown Composer (for using opml as a bridge between outlines and markdown)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Omnifocus for me largely comes into its own in salvation-workflows, like 'rescue from email'.
 
 
 
>
Omnioutliner for iPad and Mac, Outliner for iPhone
 
 
 
*
This was put together in Omnioutliner, exported to html (then tweaked with BBEdit) so you've basically had a tutorial in some of the things you can do with it just by getting this far. Anything you can't write down in one sitting should live in an outline (or mind-map).
Mind maps are great but I only do it on paper, not digitally. I don't like the mouse and outliners are easier on a screen, to my mind.
 
 
 
>
(Rescue from) Email: a workflow
 
 
 
>
For me, 'just answering them' is not an option. There are too many, always. My head spins. I've finally cracked it recently, pretty much.
 
 
 
>
1. Email comes in. It gets shipped out to Omnifocus and preferably a project and context as fast as possible thanks to emailganizeremailganizer (ios) and MailMate(Mac). If there's not a project or context, invent one.
Get.The.Email.Out.Of.Your.Inbox.
Then periodically merge these random projects. 'Tackling the inbox' means throwing them into projects, not answering them.
 
 
 
*
Sometimes the 'context' can be in the email as a distinct folder (eg 'for diary'
 
 
 
*
2. Tackle stuff via projects and contexts, never through approaching your inbox
 
 
 
>
Priorities and workflow
 
 
 
>
2. Plain text capability (preferably Markdown to produce rich text for those who like it).
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Emailganizer suggests where to file stuff very cleverly and if it guesses wrong, you can choose where. Now I can file at odd moments, send to Omnifocus, put in a 'context' (eg 'diary') to work through properly in a project way instead of piecemeal.
 
 
 
>
 
 
 
*
MailMate is plain-text with rich text views. It uses markdown so you can compose easily and produce rich text if you want it.
 
 
 
*
More importantly for me, you can move messages via the keyboard: hit command-alt T, start typing the name of the mailbox til it hits the right one, hit return, done.
You can also send stuff to Omnifocus.
 
 
 
*
1. Filing. I've tried many ways but ultimately using a lot of folders is the way I work. That means sorting has to be easy (semi-automated, doable via the keyboard).
 
cv
 
This is more of a full record than a cv.
*
Click on the black disclosure triangles to show/hide the various sections.
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Jason Davies, SFHEA
V
Intellectual Wanderings
 
 
UCL Arena Centre for Advancing Research-Based Education (formerly CALT)
1-19 Torrington Place
London WC1E 6BT
+44 (0)20 3108 6457 (int 56457)
Twitter: @JasonPtrDavies
Senior Teaching Fellow (attached to UCL Institute of Education)
*
Having researched and taught in several departments at UCL and occasionally beyond, I have been in the UCL Arena Centre for Research-based Education (formerly CALT) since 2003. I work particularly with the UCL Institute of Education after several years of working with BEAMS (Faculties of Engineering, Maths and Physical Sciences and the Bartlett School of Architecture) to explore teaching and learning of all kinds.
With a background in ancient languages, history, history of religion and medicine, I moved into interdisciplinarity and higher education as my fields of study and teaching, which shows in my predominantly reflexive approach, with an emphasis on supporting disciplinary integrity.
Keywords: interdisciplinarity, disciplinarity, teaching and learning, reflective practice, threshold concepts, academic practice
 
 
Recent Talks
V
Learning, Cultural Theory, Threshold Concepts
 
 
*
2018 June 'Intersectionality, Research-based Education, and Assessment: A Pan-Curricular Threshold Concept', 7th Biennial Threshold Concepts conference, Miami University, Oxford Ohio
 
 
 
*
2018 'Disabling Grief', Ableism in Academia, UCL Institute of Education (livestream of day)
 
 
 
*
2017 December 'The Necessary Narcissism of The Academic Disciplines',
Conference on Narcissism, Institute of Advanced Study, UCL
 
 
 
*
2016 July ‘Mary Douglas’s Cultural Theory: Learning and the Ends of Inquiry’, Improving University Teaching | Conference Program
 
 
 
*
2016 June 'Thresholding Ancient Religion': a trifold approach, 6th Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference, Dalhousie University
 
 
Publications
V
History, Interdisciplinarity, Education; monograph, chapters, articles
 
 
 
>
Monograph
 
 
 
 
 
 
V
Edited collection
 
 
 
*
2018 (eds Davies & Pachlern) Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Perspectives from UCL (open access pdf), UCL IOE Press
 
 
 
V
Chapters/articles/pieces
 
 
 
*
(forthcoming 2018) ' Whose Dream Is It Anyway? Navigating the Significance of Dreams in the Ancient World' in Divine Interventions? Reassessing Ancient Divination (ed Lindsay Driediger-Murphy and Esther Eidinow)
 
 
 
*
(forthcoming 2018) 'The Value(s) of Belief: Ancient Religion, Cognitive Science and Interdisciplinarity' in Theorizing Ancient Religion (ed Nickolas P. Roubekas), Equinox Press
 
 
 
*
2018 'Threshold Concepts as Pathways Through Ancient Religion: Curriculum as Initiation', Threshold Concepts on the Edge (ed. Land et al)
 
 
 
*
2016 'Threshold Guardians': Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Discipline: chapter in Land, R., Meyer J.H.F. and Flanagan, M.T, (Eds) Threshold Concepts in Practice. Rotterdam, Taipei & Boston: Sense Publishers, 121-134
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2012-? 'Discipline and Belief' in a collected volume for CUP that has not so far appeared, but I won't embarrass the overworked editor here...
 
 
 
*
2011 'Believing the Evidence' in Evidence, Inference and Enquiry, (Proceedings of the British Academy 171, eds. Dawid, Twining, Vasilaki, Oxford University Press), 395-434
 
 
 
*
2011 'Disciplining the Disciplines' in Evidence, Inference and Enquiry, (Proceedings of the British Academy 171, eds. Dawid, Twining, Vasilaki, Oxford University Press), 37-72
 
 
 
*
2009 'Religion in Ancient Historiography', in the Cambridge Companion to the Roman Historians (ed. Dr Andrew Feldherr), 166-180
 
 
 
*
2009 'The messiness of academics 'speaking across the disciplines'' in Collaborative Working in Higher Education: The Social Academy (eds. L. Walsh and P. Kahn, Routledge), 111-118
 
 
 
>
Peer Review
 
 
 
*
I have undertaken anonymous peer review in higher education for journals, conference submissions and grant councils but it's anonymous.
 
 
 
*
2015 September 'Threshold Concepts and Teaching Ancient Religion' Teaching and Learning Ancient Religion Network, Senate House (London)
 
 
Current Projects
 
 
 
*
UCL Arena course tutor (Arena 1, Arena 2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Overseer of UCL Provost's Teaching Awards (2015-2017)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
This will be fun. Just setting up the email list...
 
 
 
>
Collation of archives from the Evidence, Inference and Enquiry Programme
 
 
 
*
Still waiting for UCL to get back to me about the archived...
 
 
Employment and Recognition
>
Education, academic practice, SFHEA, interdisciplinarity, ancient history
 
 
 
*
2007-Present: Senior Teaching Fellow, CALT, UCL
 
 
 
*
Senior Fellow, Higher Education Academy
 
 
 
>
2003-07 Research Fellow, jointly in:
 
 
 
*
Leverhulme & ESRC-funded Interdisciplinary Programme on Evidence, Inference and Enquiry at UCL (History & Interdisciplinary Projects)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2000-03 Post-doctoral Fellow:Wellcome Trust for the History of Medicine at UCL (Affiliate Fellow 2003-7)
 
 
Education
>
1994-98 PhD: History, UCL
 
 
 
*
1992-93 M.A. Classics: Greek & Latin, UCL
 
 
 
*
1988-91 B.A. (Hons): Classical Studies (Major Greek), University of Reading (First Class)
 
 
Grants
>
UCL Graduate School, Research funds
 
 
 
*
2008-14 Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence, UCL Graduate School
 
 
 
*
2003-07 Research Fellowship in Leverhulme/ESRC-funded interdisciplinary project 'Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence' at UCL
 
 
 
*
2000-2003 Wellcome Trust Postdoctoral Fellowship
 
 
 
*
British Academy PhD Scholarship 1994-7
 
 
 
*
British Academy MA Scholarship 1992-3
 
 
Formal and QA roles
>
Director UCL Arena, MA Programme leadership, Graduate Tutor, Chair BoE, national rep, European project, SRHE network convenorship, ESRC rapporteur
 
 
 
V
Institutional
 
 
 
*
Organiser UCL Teaching and Learning Conference 2016 and 2015
 
 
 
*
and of UCL Provost's Teaching Awards, 2015-
 
 
 
*
Interim Director UCL Arena, 2017-
 
 
 
V
Departmental
 
 
 
*
2008-13 Departmental Graduate Tutor
 
 
 
*
2008-present MA Education Programme Leader (also with responsibility for MA Academic Practice, Adult Learning and Professional Development; deputy 2007)
 
 
 
*
2010-present Chair, Combined Postgraduate Board of Examiners (deputy 2007-10)
 
 
 
V
National
 
 
 
V
External examiner
 
 
 
>
2008-12 Glasgow University's School of Interdisciplinary Studies MA Liberal Arts
 
 
 
*
2010-2012 Text and Communication (year 1)
 
 
 
*
2008-2012 Creative Enquiry Project (year 4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Rapporteur
 
 
 
*
I have served as a rapporteur for the ESRC for a project on Technology-enhanced interdisciplinary learning.
 
 
 
>
National Rep
 
 
 
*
As of 2012, I am the National Representative for UALL - The Universities Association for Lifelong Learning in Higher Education at the European Association for Lifelong Learning (EUCEN)
 
 
 
*
2013- Co-convenor Society for Research into Higher Education Academic Practice Network
 
 
 
>
European
 
 
 
*
I was a partner on the IMPLEMENT (2010-2012) for UCL, which focuses on embedding lifelong learning in universities.
 
 
Teaching
>
PhD, MA, MRes, BASc: Education, Interdisciplnarity, Classics, Ancient History, History of Science
 
 
 
>
PhD
 
 
 
*
external examiner for Robert Blake: Revisiting the writing process in the digital age: the writing practices and processes of science and technology undergraduates at Lancaster University
 
 
 
*
second supervisor Adrian Chapman 'The Mutual Audience: A New Model of Audience in Student Writing at University' (2013)
 
 
 
>
60 credits MA Dissertations
 
V
Various dissertations supervised, organised and administered 2005-2014 in MAs
 
 
*
Adult Learning & Professional Development
 
 
 
*
Academic Practice
 
 
 
*
Education
 
 
 
>
Titles include:
 
 
 
*
Can Critical Thinking Skills Be Taught and Assessed? An Exploratory Investigation into a Critical Thinking Training Programme
 
 
 
*
The Impact of Students' Learning Styles on Learning Outcomes and Student Satisfaction in Traditional and Blended Learning
 
 
 
*
District Nurse Education: a study to explore options to provide the skills, knowledge and competence required
 
 
 
*
The Establishment and Use of Significant Event Analysis (SEA) for General Practitioners
 
 
 
>
30 credits M-level
 
 
 
>
Higher Education and Academic Identity aimed at facilitating established and senior lecturers' explorations of interdisciplinarity and academic identity.
 
 
 
*
Practical Learning Environments an exploration (despite the title) of virtual and cultural environments as a locus for teaching.
 
 
 
*
Exploring Learning and Higher Education (as course tutor) – aimed at probationary lecturers in HE, taking a reflexive approach to the nature of teaching to assist participants to develop their approach to teaching their discipline.
 
 
 
>
15 credits M-level
 
 
 
*
Policy and Perspectives in Adult Education the long view on adult education: grounded in historical surveys, participants nominate an area of relevance and interest for their essays.
 
 
 
*
Investigating Research is a 'transferable skills' module offered to MRes students across UCL across more than ten disciplines. It draws heavily on history of science and medicine. The course has participants reflect on the role of research within society (eg engagement with the public and other stakeholders, ethics and research, actor-network theory, policy issues, interdisciplinarity and trans-institutional working).
 
 
 
*
Researching Practice where participants undertake an iterative research project into their practice.
 
 
 
*
Reflective Practice: Theory and Practice exploring and cultivating the reflexive (habitually reflective) practitioner.
 
 
 
*
Directed Reading (as supervisor) involved 'distance' supervision of literature review on a negotiated topic.
 
 
 
*
Quality, Consistency and Cost-Effectiveness explores the understanding and deployment of elegant curriculum design with a deliberate focus on maintaining standards within constraints, drawing on a variety of discourses (particularly ethics and professionalism).
 
 
 
>
Programme Leadership
 
 
 
*
As course director 2008-2014, I oversaw all aspects of enrolment, registration and pastoral care including designing progression frameworks and co-ordinated dissertation supervision.
 
 
 
>
Non-credit bearing teaching
 
 
 
>
PGTA Orientation
 
 
 
*
From 2013 I have repeatedly presented our Introduction to Teaching in Higher Education to PGTAs in the school of BEAMS and set up the companion Moodle site.
 
 
 
*
2007-12 Interdisciplinary Studies of Evidence is a non credit-bearing UCL Graduate School course which I organise and have taught on for several years. Participants are introduced to essential methodologies and approaches to evidence from a wide range of disciplines (Anthropology, Economics, Statistics, Astronomy, Fine Art, Law, Archaeology and History were offered recently).
 
 
 
*
I generally offer the opening session on Disciplinarity and a closing one on Interdisciplinarity to link the different fields presented, as well as offering the History session myself. The last is built around the ancient world and the variety of approaches to evidence in Roman literature, religion and medicine.
 
 
 
>
Undergraduate
 
V
During my PhD and for some time afterwards, I built a broad portfolio of classical courses in a number of universities: though my specialisms were Roman religion and historiography, I also taught both languages regularly as well as broader courses on literature and culture in both the Greek and the Roman spheres.
 
 
*
1996 Birkbeck Other People in Greek & Roman Thought (with Dr E. Curti)
 
 
 
*
2000-01 UCL (History) The Romans and Their Past
 
 
 
*
1999 Bristol University Literary Sources for Greek and Roman History (with Mr E. McQueen)
 
 
 
*
1999-00 Birkbeck Roman Religion
 
 
 
>
1995-97 PG Teaching Assistant for UCL (History):
 
 
 
*
The Roman Empire from Augustus to Theodosius
 
 
 
*
Reading Historians & Concepts and Categories;
 
 
 
*
1998 Exeter University Latin Literature and Texts (Tacitus Annals 4)
 
 
 
*
2000 & 2001 UCL (History) Religious Conversion in Late Antiquity
 
 
 
*
1998 Birkbeck Augustan Rome (with Dr Emmanuele Curti)
 
 
*
1995-2000 A level marker for JACT Classical Civilisations
 
 
 
*
2000-01 Birkbeck Beginners' Greek
 
 
 
*
1998-00 Birkbeck Study Skills
 
 
 
*
1997-98 Birkbeck Latin Literature – Tacitus Annals 4 & 14
 
 
 
*
1998-00 City Literary Institute (for Birkbeck) Beginners' Latin
 
 
 
*
2012- Postmodernism, Genre and Discipline as part of UCL BASc foundation year
 
 
 
*
1996-00 Summer School in Classics (KCL/UCL; Latin and Greek, all levels)
 
 
 
*
2006-7 BA interdisciplinary dissertation joint supervision in UCL (Anthropology), 'Evidence and Medical Concepts' for Human Sciences Seminar Project (ancient and modern medicine)
 
 
 
*
1997-99 UCL (Greek & Latin) Beginners' Greek
 
 
 
*
2000 UCL (Greek & Latin) Latin Unseens
 
 
Talks, Presentations and Research Seminars
V
Series chair; interdisciplinarity, education, digital literacy, postmodernism, literature, history
 
 
 
>
Chair/Organiser
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
>
Individual Talks
 
 
 
*
2014 May 'Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Disciplines' UCL Teaching and Learning Exchange
 
 
 
*
2014 April 'Teaching and Learning Ancient Religion roundtable' (with Esther Eidinow and Susan Deacy) Classical Association 2014
 
 
 
*
2012 June 'Locked Doors: Threshold Concepts as Guardians of the Disciplines' Biennial Thresholds Conference, NAIRTL, Trinity College Dublin
 
 
 
*
2012 May Workshop on Curriculum in Partnership for IMPLEMENT project, University of Graz, Austra
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2010 Nov 'Inferring the obvious: belief and other unrepresentables', Corpus Christi Classical Seminar, Oxford
 
 
 
*
2010 Apr '"Living on the ceiling": how and why interdisciplinarity turns everything upside down', Society for Research into Higher Education Academic Practice Network on The challenges of collaborative work in the academy
 
 
 
*
2010 July 'Professional Doctorates: a symposium' (with Sue Cross) Teaching and Learning Conference, UCL
 
 
 
*
2008 Oct "'Gloves off'': ''religion'', ''belief'' and discourse – a polemic on deprecating Cicero's De Diuinatione', St Andrews Research Seminar
 
 
 
*
2008 July 'Thinking Inside the Box: Disciplinarity, culture, -isms, problems/solutions and Education', Critical Realism and Education, Institute of Education
 
 
 
*
2008 Apr 'Interdisciplinarity & Teaching: After the Leverhulme Evidence Project', Teaching and Learning Conference, UCL
 
 
 
*
2007 May 'Believing in Ancient Rome', Symposium on ancient religion, St Paul's Cathedral study group
 
 
 
*
2007 Dec 'Evidence: a Case Study of Interdisciplinarity', Evidence Satellite Conference', UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2007 Dec '''Not like Us"; the real problem with old alterity', Evidence Satellite Conference', UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2006 Feb 'Belief, Dreams and Managing Significance', Colloquium on Roman Religion, Erfurt (Germany)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2005 Dec 'How to use a wiki ', UCL (general audience)
 
 
 
*
2004 Oct 'The Trouble With Prediction', Evidence Programme, UCL
 
 
 
*
2004 Nov 'Interdisciplinarity' (with Stephen Rowland), Evidence Programme, UCL
 
 
 
*
2004 June 'The Risks the Romans Ran', Provost's Dinner, UCL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2003 Mar 'Medicine and Magic in the Roman Empire: the Evidence of Galen', Classical Association, Warwick
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2002 Nov 'Whose Dream is it Anyway? (part II)', University of Reading Seminar
 
 
 
*
2002 Dec 'Whose Dream is it Anyway? (part III)', The Dream and the Sciences of the Human, Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL/Warburg Institute
 
 
 
*
2001 Mar 'Why One Should Not Read Livy', London Association of Classical Teachers (A level audience)
 
 
 
*
1999 May 'Suicide in Livy and Tacitus', UCL Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Suicide
 
 
 
*
1998 Nov 'Ammianus Marcellinus and the End of Expiation' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1998 Mar 'The Historian and the Incredible: Livy and Tacitus on Religious Crisis', European Social Science and History Conference, Amsterdam
 
 
 
*
1997 Nov 'multa alia ludibria nuntiata : did Livy believe in prodigies?' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1997 Jan 'Religious Codes in Roman Annalistic History' (Oxford Classics PG Series)
 
 
 
*
1997 Feb 'The Gods of War: or why the Romans were always right' (Oxford/London PG Colloquium, Institute of Classical Studies)
 
 
 
*
1996 Oct 'Talking about the Gods of the Past: the Case of Tacitus' (Institute of Classical Studies Ancient History Seminars)
 
 
 
*
1996 Nov 'The Religious Experience of (Some) Ancient Peoples' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
 
*
1996 Mar 'Reasons to be Cheerful: Tacitus on the gods', Loxbridge, London
 
 
 
*
1995 Oct 'Orthodox Miracles: the Appropriation of Religious Charisma in Tacitus' Histories ', (South of England & Wales Postgraduate Series): also presented later at Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar
 
 
 
*
1993 Nov 'Underground ''christians'' in Pagan Rome: Analysing the Underground Basilica of the Porta Maggiora' (Institute of Classical Studies PG Seminar)
 
 
Book Reviews
>
Classics, ancient history, ancient science
 
 
 
*
G. Forsythe (2010) Time in Roman religion: one thousand years of religious history, (Routledge studies in ancient history; 4.) Journal of Roman Studies forthcoming
 
 
 
*
M. Lipka (2009) Roman Gods: A Conceptual Approach (Religions in the Graeco-Roman World 167). Leiden/Boston: Brill, Journal of Roman Studies 101 (2011), 257-8
 
 
 
*
J. Scheid (2005) 'Quand faire, c'est croire. Les rites sacrificiels des romains', (Paris), Classical Review (2008), 58
 
 
 
*
Green C.M.C. Roman Religion and the cult of Diana at Aricia (2007) and C.E. Schultz, and Paul B. Harvey jr (2007) Religion in Republican Italy (CUP), Journal of Roman Studies 99, (2009), 245-7
 
 
 
*
M.-L. Haack Les Haruspices dans le monde romain (Pessac, 2003), Journal of Roman Studies 97 (2007), 283-4
 
 
 
*
B. Näf (2004) Traum und Traumdeutung im Altertum (Darmstadt), Classical Review
 
 
 
*
G. Hart (2000) Asclepius, the god of medicine, (London), Medical History 47 (3) (July 2003)
 
 
 
*
I. Gradel (2002) Emperor Worship and Roman Religion (Oxford), JACT Review 33 (Summer 2003)
 
 
 
*
R. Valantasis (ed.) (2000) Religions of Late Antiquity in Practice (Oxford), Journal of Roman Studies 93 (2003)
 
 
 
*
H.-F. Mueller (2002) Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (Routledge), Journal of Roman Studies 93 (2003)
 
 
 
*
H. W. Benario (ed. & tr.) (1999) Tacitus' 'Germany' (Warminster) & J. B. Rives (ed. & tr.) (1999) Tacitus' Germania (Oxford), Phoenix 2001.4
 
 
 
*
J. A. North (2000) Roman Religion (Oxford: Greece and Rome New Surveys in the Classics 30), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
E. Craik (2000) Hippocrates: Places in Man (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
T. E. H. Harrison (2000) Divinity and History: the Religion of Herodotus (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
J. Gould (2001) Myth, Ritual Memory, and Exchange: Essays in Greek Literature and Culture (Oxford), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
K. Dowden (2000) European Paganism: the Realities of Cult from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (London & NY), JACT Review 30 (Autumn 2001)
 
 
 
*
G. E. R. Lloyd (1999) Science, Folklore and Ideology: Studies in the Life Sciences in Ancient Greece (Bristol: reissue of 1983 edition by Cambridge University Press), JACT Review 29 (Summer 2001)
 
 
 
*
J. F. Healy (1999) Pliny The Elder on Science and Technology (Oxford), JACT Review 29 (Summer 2001)
 
 
 
*
M. Edwards, M. Goodman & S. Price (eds) (1999) Apologetics in the Roman Empire (Oxford), BMCR 00.07.07
 
 
 
*
R. Ash (1999) Ordering Anarchy: Armies and Leaders in Tacitus' Histories (London), BMCR 00.05.21
 
 
 
*
V. Rosenberger (1998) Gezähmte Götter: Das Prodigienwesen der römischen Republik (Stuttgart 1998), Journal of Roman Studies 90 (2000)
 
 
 
*
D. Felton (1999) Haunted Greece and Rome: Ghost Stories from Classical Antiquity (Austin, Texas), Journal of Roman Studies 90 (2000)
 
 
 
*
N. Morley (1999) Writing Ancient History (London), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
M. Grant (1999) The Collapse and Recovery of the Roman Empire (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
R. Miles (1999) Constructing Identities in Late Antiquity (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000);
 
 
 
*
B. Levick (1999) Vespasian (London & New York), JACT Review 27 (Summer 2000)
 
 
 
*
R. Mellor (1999) The Roman Historians (London & New York), BMCR 99.6.24
 
 
 
*
A. J. Woodman (1998) Tacitus Reviewed (Oxford), BMCR 99.7.22
 
 
 
*
T. P. Wiseman (1998) Roman Drama and Roman History (Exeter), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
A. Feldherr (1998) Spectacle and Society in Livy's History (Berkeley, Los Angeles, London), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
F. Graf (1997) Magic in the Ancient World (Cambridge Mass.), JACT Review 1999
 
 
 
*
E. Orlin (1997) Temples, Politics and Religion in Republican Rome (Leiden), BMCR 99.1.11
 
 
 
*
J. Rabinowitz (1998) The Rotting Witch (New York), BMCR 98.5.11
 
 
 
*
T. Habinek & A. Schiesaro (eds) (1997) The Roman Cultural Revolution (Cambridge), JACT Review 1998
 
 
 
*
W. Hansen (ed.) (1996) The Amazing Stories of Phlegon of Tralles (Exeter), BMCR 97.5.8
 
 
 
*
P. G. Walsh (1996) Livy XL (Warminster), BMCR 96.12.13
 
 
Digital Literacy (Apple only)
>
Outliners, plain text, (multi)markdown, LaTeX, emailers, everything's a project
 
 
 
*
This section is a bit more rambling but basically summarises a few workflows for managing all that stuff. It's taken twenty years to get the hang of it so it seemed worth mentioning.
 
 
 
>
Plain text and mark-up
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
2) Beautiful typeset output
 
 
 
*
3) Initially steep learning curve, briefly, then a level plane, unlike Word with shallow start followed by almost vertical learning curve that never seems to end.
 
 
 
*
1) internally consistent files (you waste so much time fighting Word and you don't even know it).
 
 
 
>
Why is plain text so important?
 
 
 
>
Plain text formats are much much easier to troubleshoot and share (if you can persuade your colleagues to make their lives better).
 
 
 
*
'Track Changes' I hear you cry but it's nothing compared to eg BBEdit 'compare front documents'. Honest.
 
 
 
*
Plain text can be edited on just about anything and creates tiny files in comparison to eg Word: easy to sync, hard to corrupt, quick to move around, transparent to those who can read them (ie everyone).
 
 
 
>
Everything that really matters and has real power is built on plain text. Plain text is where almost everything that is interesting actually happens. Nothing happens without it.
 
 
 
*
Videos and pictures are not included but what is included in that statement is making those things available, eg through html.
 
 
 
>
Plain text forces you to think things through.
 
 
 
*
In LaTeX or html, you have to tell it that "section 1" is a section, as opposed to the fairly typical practice with Word of randomly applying styles where by section 7 you can't remember if it was 16 Times New Roman or 15 Palatino.
 
 
 
*
Mac: one text-editor to rule them all – BBEdit
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Multimarkdown lets you go between plain-text, opml (outliner), formatted text (rtf, doc, LaTeX, html).
 
 
 
*
iOS: plenty to choose from, I choose Textastic (iPad and iPhone)
 
 
 
>
Outlining and projects
 
 
 
*
Multimarkdown Composer (for using opml as a bridge between outlines and markdown)
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Omnifocus for me largely comes into its own in salvation-workflows, like 'rescue from email'.
 
 
 
>
Omnioutliner for iPad and Mac, Outliner for iPhone
 
 
 
*
This was put together in Omnioutliner, exported to html (then tweaked with BBEdit) so you've basically had a tutorial in some of the things you can do with it just by getting this far. Anything you can't write down in one sitting should live in an outline (or mind-map).
Mind maps are great but I only do it on paper, not digitally. I don't like the mouse and outliners are easier on a screen, to my mind.
 
 
 
>
(Rescue from) Email: a workflow
 
 
 
>
For me, 'just answering them' is not an option. There are too many, always. My head spins. I've finally cracked it recently, pretty much.
 
 
 
>
1. Email comes in. It gets shipped out to Omnifocus and preferably a project and context as fast as possible thanks to emailganizeremailganizer (ios) and MailMate(Mac). If there's not a project or context, invent one.
Get.The.Email.Out.Of.Your.Inbox.
Then periodically merge these random projects. 'Tackling the inbox' means throwing them into projects, not answering them.
 
 
 
*
Sometimes the 'context' can be in the email as a distinct folder (eg 'for diary'
 
 
 
*
2. Tackle stuff via projects and contexts, never through approaching your inbox
 
 
 
>
Priorities and workflow
 
 
 
>
2. Plain text capability (preferably Markdown to produce rich text for those who like it).
 
 
 
 
 
 
*
Emailganizer suggests where to file stuff very cleverly and if it guesses wrong, you can choose where. Now I can file at odd moments, send to Omnifocus, put in a 'context' (eg 'diary') to work through properly in a project way instead of piecemeal.
 
 
 
>
 
 
 
*
MailMate is plain-text with rich text views. It uses markdown so you can compose easily and produce rich text if you want it.
 
 
 
*
More importantly for me, you can move messages via the keyboard: hit command-alt T, start typing the name of the mailbox til it hits the right one, hit return, done.
You can also send stuff to Omnifocus.
 
 
 
*
1. Filing. I've tried many ways but ultimately using a lot of folders is the way I work. That means sorting has to be easy (semi-automated, doable via the keyboard).