ARCLG141 Issues in Conservation: Contexts of Conservation

Coordinator: R. Peters

 

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UCL Institute of Archaeology
MA in Principles of Conservation
ARCLG141

ARCLG141 is one of the core courses of the MA in Principles of Conservation at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

This course examines the nature and history of conservation of cultural heritage objects, and discusses practical, professional and ethical issues. It focuses on the role of conservation in museums and in disciplines such as archaeology and anthropology, and on the effects of political, cultural and institutional contexts on conservation practice.

 

Communicating Conservation 2010

 

Project coordinated by R. Peters and I. Carroll

As part of their assessed work for this course, students are asked to design and produce a poster communicating aspects of conservation. The poster consists of two main parts: the poster itself and an accompanying paper.

The topic proposed this year is:


“The impact of conservation on the lives of people in the present”

 

You can see some of the posters below. Note that their contents are the sole responsibility of their authors and and may not correspond to the views of the UCL Institute of Archaeology or any of the institutions they may happen to discuss.
 

L BarterBY L. BARTER

OBJECTS ON THE GO. TRAVELING EXHIBITIONS: BRINGING THE WORLD TO YOUR DOORSTEP

Such exhibits can be used to high-light the critical role of conservators in a positive light. The benefits of utilizing more of the collection, expanding the viewership, and completing needed treatment to the objects outweigh the slight increase to standard known risks which can be mitigated.


TARGET AUDIENCE: Conservation students, conservation professionals, and museum staff. Changing possibly negative perceptions concerning travelling exhibitions.

N Bergmans BY N. BERGMANS

A TOUCHING EXPERIENCE

Poster advertising object handling sessions for people with visual impairments at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. The poster aims to encourage people to attend by giving practical information about the sessions and by highlighting two main benefits of touch in museums: learning and aesthetic enjoyment.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Blind or visually impaired people living in the catchment area of the Ashmolean museum, and their carers or parents.

 


R DanielsBY D.R.

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION! CONSERVTION VS FILMING

The aim of the poster is to introduce potential new staff and crew members to the hazards and impact that conservation and filming can bring on the historic house environment. It covers potential issues and impacts that can arise and gives interesting ‘top tips’ that can help make a production run smoother.

TARGET AUDIENCE: House Staff and production crew members.

 


D Davis BY D. DAVIS

THE DEAD AS OBJECT

The growing advocacy of indigenous peoples for the return of ancestral remains that are housed in museums and other institutions has brought the ethics of displaying and warehousing of human remains into the public eye. Curators and conservators must balance this issue against their role as educators of the past.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Primary: Curators and Conservators. Secondary: Museum Directors.

 


BY I. DEN BOER

METAL DETECTING

Even though metal detecting is a popular hobby in England, most people who don’t actively engage in it do not know how to practice it responsibly. This poster gives a brief introduction into responsible metal detecting with references to websites that contain more information about these topics.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Potential metal detectorists who have been thinking about doing metal detecting as a hobby, but who have not made up their minds yet.

 

M Gillispie BY M.GILLESPIE

CONSERVATION IN THE PICTURE

Photographs provide valuable information and memories. Collections of photographs are stored and displayed in many homes. Photographs are, however, susceptible to deterioration. This poster provides the public with information about deteriorating factors associated with photographs and conservation advice on how to care for photographs within the home environment.


TARGET AUDIENCE: The target audience is people who keep collections of photographs within their own homes.

 

 


R GreenbergBY R. GREENBERG

THINKING OF TAKING A PIECE OF HISTORY?

It is imperative for those visiting archaeological sites to understand the importance of conservation. This poster aims to educate visitors to Hadrian’s Wall about the challenges faced, and what they can do to minimize their impact and help preserve the Wall for future generations.


TARGET AUDIENCE: Visitors to Hadrian’s Wall.

 

 

 


F GuiducciBY F. GUIDUCCI

IS IT JUST CONSERVATION? UNPREDICTABLE ASPECTS OF CONSERVATION PROJECTS.

When a conservation project is strictly related to a complex context the implications may be many. Conservators have to try to understand all the significances of objects, in order to keep a balance between all the different parties involved. The conservation of the statues of Monte Prama, Sardinia, is an effective example.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Conservators on training.

 


R HarrisonBY N. HARRISON

INVISIBLE CONSERVATION. SEEING THE IMPACT OF CONSERVATION

A poster designed to inform museum visitors of the ways conservators look at objects and how this understanding affects the way objects are presented in museums. It is intended as a response to the secrecy surrounding the extent of conservation/restoration on objects.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Adult Museum Visitors.

R Lopez BravoBY R. LOPEZ BRAVO

SAVE YOUR LOCAL PUB

This poster aims to make its audience aware of the importance of preserving the culture of pubs. It lists the main aspects which characterize a pub and reasons why pubs must be preserved for future generations.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Adults who are regular patrons of the pub.

 


M MillerBY M. MILLER

EXPLODING THE MYTH: A MISCONCEPTION THAT SHOULD BE CHALLENGED

Certain myths surrounding collections care persist in small museums without access to specialist knowledge, particularly that dust provides a protecting layer on the surface of museum objects. The poster aims to challenge this myth and point out the true risks of allowing dust to build up in museum collections.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Non-specialist staff and volunteers in small museums.

 


S MinnetBY S. MINETT

HERITAGE BROUGHT TO LIFE

This poster deals with the issue of conserving intangible heritage in museums. It includes examples of intangible heritage practices and presents key ways that these can be incorporated into museums. Its aim is to present intangible heritage and conservation as exciting and inclusive.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Museum professionals.


E PayneBY E. PAYNE

CSI: SITTINGBOURNE


This poster is designed to illustrate the positive impact of community conservation projects through a case-study of one such initiative ‘CSI: Sittingbourne’, which directly involves local people with the conservation of Anglo-Saxon finds from a grave-site in Sittingbourne.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Professional conservators and local government authority workers from the Leisure and Culture Department

 

 


N Pearce BY N. PEARCE

CONSERVATION AT MACHU PICCHU IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TOO

The poster is to make tourists aware of the sometimes negative impact that they have on World Heritage Sites by informing them of the major concerns, causes of damage and conservation at Machu Picchu. However, by following basic steps, they can assist in the conservation and preservation of Machu Picchu.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Tourists who visit Machu Picchu

 


R Pont BY R. PONT

WHY BUY A LISTED BUILDING?

This poster is attempting to persuade people to purchase a listed building for commercial use. By doing this not only are they buying an important piece of their heritage but conserving it for the future and investing in a unique selling point.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Potential owners of listed buildings for commercial use.

 

 

F Ravaioli BY F. RAVAIOLI


The poster uses a contemporary case study to analyze how conservation affects the lives of people. I illustrate the issues that concern the reconstruction of the Italian town of l’Aquila. The poster also deals with the connection between heritage and local people’s identity.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Students or professionals who deal with cultural heritage.

 

 

S Roberts BY S. ROBERTS

CONSERVATION: HELPING HERITAGE LAST


This poster is designed to be used in the U.S., at high school and college level career fairs. It is meant to increase awareness of the field, attract people to the profession and tell them how they could become a conservator.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Main: High school and college students, approximately 16 to 20 years old.

Secondary: Parents, teachers, school counselors and academic advisors


. L Sapsford BY L. S.

WILDLIFE IN YOUR WARDROBE


‘Wildlife in Your Wardrobe’ enables the audience to identify the two most common clothes moths in the UK, whilst giving preventive and remedial advice negating the need for pesticides.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Primary: Women (18 – 35)
Secondary: Men (18 – 35)
Tertiary: Women and Men (35 +)

 

 

K Shulze BY K. S.

ENSURING A PAST FOR THE FUTURE: EXCAVATION WITHOUT CONSERVATION IS DESTRUCTION"

Conservation is an integral part of archaeology and excavations can only benefit from a conservator being on-site. Conservation is an ethical responsibility, but equally important are the technical skills of conservators that allow for artifact stabilization and also maximize the information that can be obtained from an object.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Archaeologists.

 

 

 

A South BY A. SOUTH

I AM GLAD I WASN'T LOOTED

Measures are being taken in Northern Peru to prevent the looting of archaeological sites. Local people are participating in the conservation of the undiscovered archaeological heritage through citizens’ patrols. This poster discusses a successful example and the results.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Tourists visiting the coastal area of Northern Peru

C Vida BY C. VIDA

CONSERVING THE INTANGIBLE

This poster reflects on the role of conservation in the safeguarding of intangible heritage. From theoretical issues affecting good conservation practice to specific areas of expertise involved in conserving the intangible.

TARGET AUDIENCE: Conservation students.


 

 

 

 


 

 

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For more information contact R. Peters