UK Parkinson's Disease Consortium - UKPDC
 
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Pedigrees and I-FP-CIT SPECT scan images of the four families with GCH1 mutations involved in this study.

GCH1 gene and Parkinson's risk

A study published in Brain, led by researchers at UCL Institute of Neurology, has shown that genetic mutations which cause a decrease in dopamine production in the brain and lead to a form of childhood-onset Dystonia, also play a role in the development of Parkinson’s disease.
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Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (LWENC)

The new Leonard Wolfson Experimental Neurology Centre (LWENC) has opened for clinical studies and trials

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Audioslide presentation on Claudia Manzoni's paper examining how fibroblasts with LRRK2 mutations react to starvation conditions and the possible deficits that they have in autophagy.

LRRK2 and autophagy in fibroblasts

In this paper Claudia Manzoni studies how fibroblast cells from people with Parkinson’s disease caused by mutations in LRRK2 react to starvation. Although the changes are quite subtle, there are differences between the way that fibroblasts that contain mutant LRRK2 respond to being starved – suggesting that there may be changes in the way that these cells regulate a key process called autophagy (a term which comes from the greek meaning to eat yourself, and is one of the ways that cells get rid of waste and recycle proteins and organellles).
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Drosophila fly model - University of Sheffield

Genetic mutations linked to Parkinson's disease

Research led by consortium researchers Dr Helene Plun-Favreau (UCL Institute of Neurology) and Dr Alex Whitworth (University of Sheffield), and collaborator Dr Heike Laman (University of Cambridge), has discovered how genetic mutations linked to Parkinson’s disease might play a key role in the death of brain cells, potentially paving the way for the development of more effective drug treatments. In the new study, published in Nature Neuroscience, the team of cross-institutional researchers showed how defects in the Parkinson’s gene Fbxo7 cause problems with mitophagy. More...

Autophagy

LRRK2 and autophagy

Mutations in LRRK2 are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson’s disease. Here, Claudia Manzoni talks about her research (funded by the Rosetrees Trust and the Michael J. Fox Foundation) into what LRRK2 might be doing within the cell: Parkinson’s disease is a brain illness that afflicts 1 in 500 people in the UK. High profile patients, such as the actor Michael J Fox, the boxer Muhammad Ali and the late Pope John Paul II, have raised public awareness of Parkinson’s and its devastating impact. More...

Department of Clinical Neuroscience, UCL

The primary area of research in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at the UCL Institute of Neurology is the investigation of the aetiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically the department, which is based at the Royal Free Campus in Hampstead, has an interest in the genetics and biochemistry of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and Friedreich’s ataxia. The department has established an international reputation in this area and in the area of diseases of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inborn errors of mitochondrial function. There are also extensive research programmes on the genetics and pathogenesis of dystonia, motor neurone disease and peripheral nerve disorders. A joint appointment with the Hammersmith Hospital has provided an additional research interest in neuropsychology.

Facilities for research are extensive. There are general laboratories for biochemistry, molecular biology, tissue preparation etc, in addition to specialist laboratory space for tissue culture (4 hoods), molecular biology, radioactive work, fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, lipid chemistry and histochemistry. There are advanced facilities for image analysis including an electron microscope.


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Page last modified on 17 mar 11 11:21