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Emily Collins

Location: Room 8.18
University College London
Malet Place Engineering Building (8th Floor)
Gower Street, London
WC1E 6BT, U.K

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7679 2175 (x32175)

Email: e.collins@ucl.ac.uk

Emily Collins

Research Interests

My previous research has focused predominantly on the effects of video games, both beneficial and detrimental. My PhD involved investigations into the existence of problematic video game use (or video game “addiction”), as well as exploration of the possible benefits of playing, including positive social and cognitive outcomes. More recently, my work has looked at the use of video games in occupational settings, investigating whether they can be used to promote better post-work recovery and reduce work-home interference.

Studying the work-home divide sparked my interest in the Digital Epiphanies project, which aims to explore how technology can both hinder and assist people in achieving a healthy work/life balance.

Background

2013 – present  Research Associate, UCLIC on the Digital Epiphanies Project      
2012 – 2013         Visiting Researcher, UCLIC
2009 – 2012         PhD in Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London
2008 – 2009         MSc in Research Methods in Psychology, University College London
2005 – 2008         BSc in Psychology, University of Exeter

Research Publications


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  • Collins, E. & Freeman, J. (2012). Problematic and non-problematic video game use, online and offline social capital and prosocial tendencies. Interactive Technologies and Games(ITAG) Conference, Nottingham Trent University.
  • Collins, E. & Freeman, J. (2012). Training the cognitive benefits of video games: Can massively multiplayer online role playing games improve performance? Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) Annual Conference, Northumbria University
  • Collins, E. & Freeman, J. (2012). Problematic video game use: Associations with online and offline social capital, extraversion and empathy. Cyberpsychology and Computer Psychology Conference (CyComp), Bolton University.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Are the cognitive benefits evident in video game players dependent on the absence of problematic video game use? British Psychological Society Cognitive Section Conference, Keele University.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). The influence of video game experience and addiction on facial expression recognition: Preliminary results. British Psychological Society Social Section Conference, Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Sensation seeking and risk taking behaviour in video game play and addiction. British Psychological Society Social Section Conference, Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Are cognitive benefits evident in video game players dependent on the absence of problematic video game use? Poster at the 7th Conference of the Media Psychology Division of the DCGP, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Can video games be a force for good? Barts and the London Science Festival. Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Are cognitive benefits evident in video game players dependent on the absence of problematic video game use? Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) Annual Conference, Bangor University.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). Are cognitive benefits evident in video game players dependent on the absence of problematic video game use? Under The Mask Conference, University of Bedfordshire.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). The cognitive benefits of video game play: The effect of video game play experience on flanker compatibility, mental rotation and enumeration tasks. British Psychological Society Postgraduate Research Symposium, London.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). The blame game: Why are video games always the scapegoat and is it ever justified? Café Scientifique, Queen Mary University of London
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2010). Personality traits associated with massively multiplayer online role playing game use and dependence. Psychology Postgraduate Affairs Group (PsyPAG) Annual Conference, Sheffield Hallam University
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2010). Personality traits associated with massively multiplayer online role playing game use and dependence. Cyberpsychology and Computer Psychology Conference, University of Bolton.
  • Collins, E., Freeman, J. & Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2010). Personality traits associated with massively multiplayer online role playing game use and dependence. British Psychological Society Postgraduate Research Symposium, London.

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