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Ana Tajadura-Jimenez

Location: Room 8.18
University College London
Malet Place Engineering Building (8th Floor)
Gower Street, London
WC1E 6BT, U.K

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7679 0697 (x30697)

Email: a.tajadura (at) ucl.ac.uk

a-t-jimenez

Research Interests

Self-perception, embodiment, human multisensory perception and emotion in everyday contexts and new media technologies. Audio-based applications that can improve body-image, self-esteem, movement patterns and social interactions to support wellbeing and rehabilitation for people with movement impairments. Embodied psychoacoustics. Auditory-induced emotion. Presence.

Background

I studied Telecommunication Engineering at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. I obtained an International MSc in Digital Communication Systems and Technology, and a PhD degree in Psychoacoustics in Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. In 2009 I moved to UK, to continue my postdoctoral research at Manos Tsakiris' Lab of Action and Body (LAB), Royal Holloway, University of London.

I was recently awarded an ESRC Future Research Leader fellowship to carry on research on the project “The Hearing Body: How auditory perception influences body representation”. From November 2012, I am based at UCLIC.

I am an ESRC Future Research Leader, carrying on research on the project “The Hearing Body: How auditory perception influences body representation”. 

In this project I am investigating how auditory information generated by our bodies updates body-representation. This mental representation we have of our bodies is essential for successful interaction with the environment. The representation is not fixed, but is continuously updated in response to the available sensory information. While previous studies have highlighted the role of vision, touch and proprioception in constructing the body-representation in the brain, the role of auditory information remains largely unknown. Interestingly, the sounds that accompany almost every bodily movement are highly rich in information about the body and the space immediately surrounding it. For instance, the sounds produced when tapping on a surface inform us about the length and strength of our arm.

I am carrying out a series of psychological experiments in order to explore how altering self-produced sounds in real-time changes different body-representations, including the representation of the space surrounding the body, the potential actions that we can perform and the emotional states linked to our body capabilities. This multidisciplinary and innovative research project will provide novel insights into the nature of body-representations and, ultimately, guide the design of audio-based applications that can improve body-image, self-esteem, movement patterns and social interactions to support wellbeing and rehabilitation for people with movement impairments.

For more information about the Hearing Body Project, please check the project website

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Page last modified on 11 mar 13 16:43 by Fleck