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  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 1 (1752-76)

    Jeremy Bentham, edited by Timothy L.S. Sprigge | May 2017

    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century.

    Monograph Law Philosophy
    The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 1 (1752-76)
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2 (1777-80)

    Jeremy Bentham, edited by Timothy L.S. Sprigge | May 2017

    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century.

    Monograph Law Philosophy
    The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 2 (1777-80)
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 3 (1781-88)

    Jeremy Bentham, edited by Ian R. Christie | May 2017

    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century.

    Monograph Law Philosophy
    The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 3 (1781-88)
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 4 (1788-93)

    Jeremy Bentham, edited by Alexander Taylor Milne | May 2017

    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. The early letters deal with Bentham’s education at Oxford University, where he was sent at the age of 12 and graduated at the age of 16, and his legal training before being admitted to the bar at the age of 21. He soon afterwards turned his back on the practice of the law and, allying himself with the more radical and sceptical figures of the continental Enlightenment, embarked on a career of law reform.

    Edited Collection Poetry Law Philosophy
    The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 4 (1788-93)
  • The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 5 (1794-97)

    Jeremy Bentham, edited by Alexander Taylor Milne | May 2017

    The first five volumes of the Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham contain over 1,300 letters written both to and from Bentham over a 50-year period, beginning in 1752 (aged three) with his earliest surviving letter to his grandmother, and ending in 1797 with correspondence concerning his attempts to set up a national scheme for the provision of poor relief. Against the background of the debates on the American Revolution of 1776 and the French Revolution of 1789, to which he made significant contributions, Bentham worked first on producing a complete penal code, which involved him in detailed explorations of fundamental legal ideas, and then on his panopticon prison scheme. Despite developing a host of original and ground-breaking ideas, contained in a mass of manuscripts, he published little during these years, and remained, at the close of this period, a relatively obscure individual. Nevertheless, these volumes reveal how the foundations were laid for the remarkable rise of Benthamite utilitarianism in the early nineteenth century.

    Monograph Law Philosophy
    The Correspondence of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 5 (1794-97)
  • A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education

    Dilly Fung | June 2017

    Is it possible to bring university research and student education into a more connected, more symbiotic relationship? If so, can we develop programmes of study that enable faculty, students and ‘real world’ communities to connect in new ways? In this accessible book, Dilly Fung argues that it is not only possible but also potentially transformational to develop new forms of research-based education. Presenting the Connected Curriculum framework already adopted by UCL, she opens windows onto new initiatives related to, for example, research-based education, internationalisation, the global classroom, interdisciplinarity and public engagement.

    Monograph Education
    A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education
  • Social Media in South India

    Shriram Venkatraman | June 2017

    One of the first ethnographic studies to explore use of social media in the everyday lives of people in Tamil Nadu, Social Media in South India provides an understanding of this subject in a region experiencing rapid transformation. The influx of IT companies over the past decade into what was once a space dominated by agriculture has resulted in a complex juxtaposition between an evolving knowledge economy and the traditions of rural life. While certain class tensions have emerged in response to this juxtaposition, a study of social media in the region suggests that similarities have also transpired, observed most clearly in the blurring of boundaries between work and life for both the old residents and the new.

    Monograph Anthropology Cultural Studies Internet Studies Popular Culture Sociology
    Social Media in South India
  • Sri Lanka at the Crossroads of History

    Edited by Zoltan Biedermann and Alan Strathern | June 2016

    The peoples of Sri Lanka have participated in far-flung trading networks, religious formations, and Asian and European empires for millennia. This interdisciplinary volume sets out to draw Sri Lanka into the field of Asian and Global History by showing how the latest wave of scholarship has explored the island as a ‘crossroads’, a place defined by its openness to movement across the Indian Ocean.

    Edited Collection Poetry History Modern Languages
    Sri Lanka at the Crossroads of History
  • Posthumanism and the Graphic Novel in Latin America

    Edward King and Joanna Page | June 2017

    Latin America is experiencing a boom in graphic novels that are highly innovative in their conceptual play and their reworking of the medium. Inventive artwork and sophisticated scripts have combined to satisfy the demand of a growing readership, both at home and abroad. Posthumanism and the Graphic Novel in Latin America, which is the first book-length study of the topic, argues that the graphic novel is emerging in Latin America as a uniquely powerful force to explore the nature of twenty-first century subjectivity. The authors place particular emphasis on the ways in which humans are bound to their non-human environment, and these ideas are productively drawn out in relation to posthuman thought and experience. The book draws together a range of recent graphic novels from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Uruguay, many of which experiment with questions of transmediality, the representation of urban space, modes of perception and cognition, and a new form of ethics for a posthuman world.

    Edited Collection Cultural Studies Languages Modern Languages Popular Culture
    Posthumanism and the Graphic Novel in Latin America
  • The First Hebrew Shakespeare Translations: A Bilingual Edition and Commentary

    Lily Kahn | June 2017

    This first bilingual edition and analysis of the earliest Shakespeare plays translated into Hebrew – Isaac Edward Salkinson’s Ithiel the Cushite of Venice (Othello) and Ram and Jael (Romeo and Juliet) – offers a fascinating and unique perspective on global Shakespeare. Differing significantly from the original English, the translations are replete with biblical, rabbinic, and medieval Hebrew textual references and reflect a profoundly Jewish religious and cultural setting.

    Monograph Jewish Studies Translation Studies
    The First Hebrew Shakespeare Translations: A Bilingual Edition and Commentary