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  • Textbook of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Edited by Deepak Kalaskar, Peter E M Butler and Shadi Ghali | June 2016

    Written by experts from London’s renowned Royal Free hospital, Textbook of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery offers a comprehensive overview of the vast topic of reconstructive plastic surgery and its various subspecialties  for introductory plastic surgery and surgical science courses.

    Textbook Health Medical Science Medicine
    Textbook of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
  • Discord and Consensus in the Low Countries, 1700-2000 (Global Dutch Series)

    Edited by Jane Fenoulhet, Gerdi Quist and Ulrich Tiedau | June 2016

    All countries, regions and institutions are ultimately built on a degree of consensus, on a collective commitment to a concept, belief or value system. This consensus is continuously rephrased and reinvented through a narrative of cohesion and challenged by expressions of discontent and discord. The history of the Low Countries is characterised by both a striving for consensus and eruptions of discord, both internally and from external challenges. This interdisciplinary volume explores consensus and discord in a Low Countries context along broad cultural, linguistic and historical lines. Disciplines represented include early-modern and contemporary history; art history; film; literature; and translation scholars from both the Low Countries and beyond.

    Edited Collection History Low Countries Studies
    Discord and Consensus in the Low Countries, 1700-2000 (Global Dutch Series)
  • Social Media in an English Village

    Daniel Miller | February 2016

    Daniel Miller spent 18 months undertaking an ethnographic study with the residents of an English village, tracking their use of the different social media platforms. Following his study, he argues that a focus on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram does little to explain what we post on social media. Instead, the key to understanding how people in an English village use social media is to appreciate just how ‘English’ their usage has become. He introduces the ‘Goldilocks Strategy’: how villagers use social media to calibrate precise levels of interaction ensuring that each relationship is neither too cold nor too hot, but ‘just right’.

    Monograph Anthropology Social Sciences Sociology
    Social Media in an English Village
  • How the World Changed Social Media

    Daniel Miller et al | February 2016

    How the World Changed Social Media is the first book in Why We Post, a book series that investigates the findings of anthropologists who each spent 15 months living in communities across the world. This book offers a comparative analysis summarising the results of the research and explores the impact of social media on politics and gender, education and commerce. What is the result of the increased emphasis on visual communication? Are we becoming more individual or more social? Why is public social media so conservative? Why does equality online fail to shift inequality offline? How did memes become the moral police of the internet?

    Monograph Anthropology Social Sciences Sociology
    How the World Changed Social Media
  • Temptation in the Archives: Essays in Golden Age Dutch Culture

    Lisa Jardine | June 2015

    Temptation in the Archives is a collection of essays by Lisa Jardine, that takes readers on a journey through the Dutch Golden Age. Through the study of such key figures as Sir Constantjin Huygens, a Dutch polymath and diplomat, we begin to see the Anglo-Dutch cultural connections that formed during this period against the backdrop of unfolding political events in England. Temptation in the Archives paints a picture of a unique relationship between the Netherlands and England in the 17th century forged through a shared experience – and reveals the lessons we can learn from it today.

    Monograph History Low Countries Studies
    Temptation in the Archives: Essays in Golden Age Dutch Culture
  • Biostratigraphic and Geological Significance of Planktonic Foraminifera 2e

    Marcelle K. Boudagher-Fadel | October 2015

    The role of fossil planktonic foraminifera as markers for biostratigraphical zonation and correlation underpins most drilling of marine sedimentary sequences and is key to hydrocarbon exploration. The first - and only - book to synthesize the whole biostratigraphic and geological usefulness of planktonic foraminifera, Biostratigraphic and Geological Significance of Planktonic Foraminifera unifies existing biostratigraphic schemes and provides an improved correlation reflecting regional biogeographies.

    Textbook Environment Geology Science
    Biostratigraphic and Geological Significance of Planktonic Foraminifera 2e
  • Treasures from UCL

    Edited by Gillian Furlong | June 2015

    UCL has one of the foremost university Special Collections in the UK. It is a treasure trove of national and international importance, comprising over a million items dating from the 4th century ad to the present day. Treasures from UCL draws together detailed descriptions and images of 70 of the most prized items. Between the magnificent illuminated Latin Bible of the 13th century and the personal items of one of the 20th century’s greatest writers, George Orwell, the many highlights of this remarkable collection will delight and intrigue anyone who picks up this book.

    Edited Collection History UCL Museums Collections
    Treasures from UCL
  • The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections

    Edited by Alice Stevenson | June 2015

    The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology first opened its doors in 1915, and since then has attracted visitors from all over the world as well as providing valuable teaching resources. Named after its founder, the pioneering archaeologist Flinders Petrie, the Museum holds more than 80,000 objects and is one of the largest and finest collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Richly illustrated and engagingly written, the book moves back and forth between recent history and the ancient past, between objects and people. Experts discuss the discovery, history and care of key objects in the collections such as the Koptos lions and Roman era panel portraits. The rich and varied history of the Petrie Museum is revealed by the secrets that sit on its shelves.

    Edited Collection Archaeology UCL Museums Collections
    The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections
  • Poems of 1890: A Selection

    Herman Gorter, translated by Paul Vincent | October 2015

    Commonly viewed as a revolutionary and propagandist Herman Gorter (1864–1927) is often overlooked despite his lasting contribution to Dutch poetry. This selection of thirty-one poems, translated by Paul Vincent, focuses on Gorter’s experimental love and nature lyrics in Poems of 1890, and the Introductionsets the poems in the context of his earlier seminal work 'Mei' (May) as well as his often neglected Socialist verse.

    Poetry History Languages Literature Low Countries Studies Translation Studies
    Poems of 1890: A Selection
  • Suburban Urbanities

    Edited by Laura Vaughan | November 2015

    Suburban space has traditionally been understood as a formless remnant of physical city expansion, without a dynamic or logic of its own. Suburban Urbanities challenges this view by defining the suburb as a temporally evolving feature of urban growth.

    Edited Collection Built Environment
    Suburban Urbanities