Teaching and Learning Portal

"Teaching is a key reason for being an academic - encounters with inquiring, intelligent students keep you fresh." 

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Learning, teaching and assessment short courses

The UCL Centre for the Advancement of Learning and Teaching (CALT) offers a number of short courses that allow staff to develop their learning, teaching and assessment skills.

You can explore some examples of the types of courses run by CALT below; to view the current programme of short courses visit the CALT website or email moira.wright@ucl.ac.uk.

Education on Stage

Level: Introductory

Workshop Leader(s): Gijs Meeusen

Course Outline: In these two half day workshops we will unravel the secrets of effectively communicating with an audience using theatre techniques. The common decay of audience attention is something that is not present in a good theatre performance. The reason for this is at one hand that actors adjust their communicative behaviour so the audience feels addressed throughout the play; they intensify their behaviour. On the other hand actors, enhance the impact of their content by applying styles matching the content at any given moment. You will learn how to use both features of intensification and application of style. You'll also get dedicated exercises to help you overcome pitfalls. The last thing you'll learn is how to make an audience curious, but we can't tell you more about that right now.

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS A TWO-PART COURSE. You will automatically be registered for both parts. Please ensure you can attend both sessions.

The Art of Teaching: Theatre Techniques for the Classroom

Category: Teaching Methods & Strategies

Workshop Leader(s): Jo Tomalin

Course Outline: Theatre training is not only for actors, but it is also of great value to everyone - especially to those who require confidence and effective communication skills in order to give presentations, lectures, or speeches. Practical and theoretical theatre experiences provide the tools to develop creative teaching strategies that enhance student participation and the learning experience.

This one-day workshop is designed for UCL Staff and will cover:

  1. Voice skills that will enhance your communication skills - such as how to warm up and project your voice effectively.
  2. Body language skills that will improve your presence.
  3. Storytelling and improvisation techniques for spontaneity.
  4. Discussing active learning strategies to motivate students and increase class participation.

The workshop includes a combination of mini lecture, active participation and discussion in a supportive environment.

The Art of Storytelling in Science Teaching

Category: Teaching Methods & Strategies

Workshop Leader(s): Gijs Meeusen

Course Outline: Even though the content we bring is without question exciting, interesting and worth all the attention in the world it would come in handy if we could make it even more exciting. Authors, storytellers, playwrights and moviemakers face the same challenge; how to cover subject content in such a way that it's exciting from the very first word to the very last scene. To succeed they use a bunch of not too difficult tools. Wouldn't it be a great idea if we just borrowed them to excite our stories on science?

In this two half day workshop we will address several tools used in story design in the context of scientific lectures. By using arcs of tension, riddles, making the audience want something, conflict and cliff-hangers you will learn to make your learners more involved, more curious and more attentive. The exercises’ given are applicable in your own context and you can use them right away. Along with writing, reading and debating we'll also do short presentation exercises during the session to help you present the fragments you have created in a more effective way.

Please note you will need to use a laptop for this session. If you do not have access to one please contact Moira Wright: moira.wright@ucl.ac.uk.

Activating Large Audiences

Category: Teaching Methods & Strategies

Workshop Leader(s):  Gijs Meeusen

Course Outline:  Activating audiences, small and large, is vital to enhance the effectiveness of any educational meeting. But activating audiences is easier said than done. In this one day workshop you'll learn to deal with various aspects of activation.

The first point to address is how to design short and challenging exercises to facilitate student learning. The use of game elements will help out in making these exercises even more activating. To help inspiration in the long run you'll get a list of 30 exercises you can do in a group along with a new way to analyse your learning objectives making it easier to turn them into exercises.

The second point to address is 'how to guide activation'.

Last point on the agenda is mentally activating an audience using riddles and prophecies.

Assessment and Feedback for Learning I - an Introduction

Category: Assessment

Level: Introductory

Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs

Course Outline: The workshop will focus on embedding assessment in the student learning process. Participants will discuss the purposes of assessment and consider how variety and innovation in assessment can enhance learning. A range of resources will be provided and participants will learn to support higher order student learning through their choice of forms of assessment.

On completion of the workshop, participants are expected to be able to:

  • Select appropriate ways of providing formative assessment (feedback) to foster higher order learning
  • Problematise the impact of different types of assessment on student learning 

Category: Assessment

Participants: Academic Staff

Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs

Course Outline: Students often feel that feedback on their work does not help them with areas they do not understand. The aim of this seminar is to enable academic staff to promote student engagement with feedback using a concept of feedback which ranges beyond the narrow definition of written comments on written work. Labour-saving strategies for providing feedback will be considered.

After the seminar, participants are expected to be able to:

  •     Formulate broad definitions of feedback to promote student learning
  •     Provide students with useful feedback in diverse ways
  •     Facilitate and encourage student use of feedback

Assessing Key Skills

Category: Assessment

Level: Introductory

Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs, Dr Jenny Marie

Course Outline: This 3 hour workshop will focus on how participants can integrate key skills into their teaching and assessment practices. Participants will discuss what key skills are, how they can be integrated into teaching provision and how they can best be assessed. Participants will plan teaching, learning and assessment activities which promote the acquisition of selected key skills on a course they teach.

On completion of the short course, participants are expected to be able to:

  • Describe how key skills can be integrated into teaching, learning and assessment on their courses
  • Design assessment tasks for key skills

Preparation: Please bring along the GPC and/or Handbook for a module that you teach.

Assessing student learning in diverse ways - portfolios

Category: Assessment
Participants: All staff who assess student learning
Level: All levels
Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs
Course Outline: Assessing student learning in diverse ways

The new Institutional Learning and Teaching Strategy states: ‘All teaching staff are strongly encouraged to use a range of methodologies for the assessment of students, in particular to reflect the extent to which students have been trained to face the challenges of the workplace, of interdisciplinary working and of skills development.’ (Paragraph 51, p.8) These taster sessions are designed as a first step in the process of introducing new assessment methods.

The focus of these sessions will be student assessment activities which engage students and promote learning. They have been selected because they all use techniques such as peer review which are integral to the working lives of academics. They have been shown to foster higher order learning amongst students and are not new to UCL.

Pre-course activity

Participants are invited to complete a short Opinio survey on what they want from each session. Please see the link below.

Post-course consultancy

Advice on the development of specific assessment processes adapted to the appropriate discipline and level of study will be available to follow up the ‘taster’ sessions. Targeted resources will be provided and meetings can be arranged as required. Please contact Rosalind Duhs.

Portfolios

Portfolios contain collections of work for assessment. Students include a table of contents. They explain how the work they have selected for inclusion in the portfolio shows that they have achieved course intended learning outcomes. This is an enormously beneficial process as it heightens students’ awareness of their learning.

During the taster session, we will be looking at how assessment portfolios can be used to build on a dialogic feedback system and how they can be managed in Moodle or through ‘My Portfolio’ to minimise staff workloads.

By the end of the session, participants should be able to:

  • Consider portfolios for use in their courses
  • Plan the use of portfolios in ways which promote student learning in their discipline.


Please complete the Opinio survey to influence the content of the session.

Assessing student learning in diverse ways – oral presentations of posters

Category: Assessment

Participants: All staff who assess student learning

Level: All levels

Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs

Course Outline: Assessing student learning in diverse ways

The focus of these sessions will be student assessment activities which engage students and promote learning. They have been selected because they all use techniques such as peer review which are integral to the working lives of academics. They have been shown to foster higher order learning amongst students and are not new to UCL.

Pre-course activity

Participants are invited to complete a short Opinio survey on what they want from each session. Please see the link below.

Post-course consultancy

Advice on the development of specific assessment processes adapted to the appropriate discipline and level of study will be available to follow up the ‘taster’ sessions. Targeted resources will be provided and meetings can be arranged as required. Please contact Rosalind Duhs.

Oral Presentation of Posters

Oral presentations of Posters are a rich way of assessing students’ learning. It is worthwhile to use this type of assessment task, which require profound engagement on the part of the student. Problem- or enquiry-based learning can be used as a basis for the creation of posters.

During the session, we will be looking at how posters can promote higher order learning on the part of students and consider diverse ways of approaching poster preparation and presentation.

By the end of the session, participants should be able to:
decide if oral presentations of posters could be integrated into their assessment diets
plan the use of oral presentations of posters to promote student learning in their discipline.

Please complete the Opinio survey to influence the content of the session.

Assessing student learning in diverse ways – self- and peer assessment

Category: Assessment

Participants: All staff who assess student learning

Level: All levels

Workshop Leader(s): Dr Rosalind Duhs

Course Outline: Assessing student learning in diverse ways

The new Institutional Learning and Teaching Strategy states: ‘All teaching staff are strongly encouraged to use a range of methodologies for the assessment of students, in particular to reflect the extent to which students have been trained to face the challenges of the workplace, of interdisciplinary working and of skills development.’ (Paragraph 51, p.8) These taster sessions are designed as a first step in the process of introducing new assessment methods.

The focus of these sessions will be student assessment activities which engage students and promote learning. They have been selected because they all use techniques such as peer review which are integral to the working lives of academics. They have been shown to foster higher order learning amongst students and are not new to UCL.

Pre-course activity

Participants are invited to complete a short Opinio survey on what they want from each session. Please see the link below.

Post-course consultancy

Advice on the development of specific assessment processes adapted to the appropriate discipline and level of study will be available to follow up the ‘taster’ sessions. Targeted resources will be provided and meetings can be arranged as required. Please contact Rosalind Duhs.

Self and peer assessment

Self- and peer assessment have the potential to raise students’ awareness of their learning. Students develop the ability to recognise and produce good work through studying and evaluating the work of their peers. Work which has already been peer assessed can be more quickly assessed by staff.

During the session, we will be looking at how to manage self- and peer assessment and considering the advantages of these processes for student learning.

By the end of the session, participants should be able to:

  • decide if self- and peer assessment could be integrated into their courses
  • plan ways of working with self- and peer assessment to promote student learning in their discipline.

Please complete the Opinio survey to influence the content of the session.

An Introduction to Research Student Supervision at UCL

Category: Advising and/or Supervising Research Students

Workshop Leader(s): Prof David Bogle

Course Outline: This session is mandatory for all members of academic staff wishing to be appointed as Supervisors at UCL as well as new members of academic staff with experience of research supervision at other institutions. It is run by the Graduate School and provides an introduction to:

  • UCL’s Regulations and Code of Practice;
  • Graduate School Support;
  • UCL Procedures;
  • Skills Development Requirements and Programme;
  • Research Student Log;
  • Factors for Successful Supervision;
  • Further Research Supervision Training.

Please note that this is a prerequisite to enrolment on all other courses about research supervision including the session Effective Research Supervision at UCL (1 day).

Date and Time:  

Effective Research Student Supervision at UCL (1 Day Workshop)

Category: Advising and/or Supervising Research Students

Workshop Leader(s): John Wakeford

Course Outline: This full-day workshop will be of equal importance to new and more experienced Supervisors and will provide participants with an overview of all the main issues faced by Supervisors today. It is particularly relevant to academics at the beginning of their career but feedback from participants shows that experienced Supervisors also find it a useful refresher course. Participants are asked in advance what particular aspects of supervision are of special concern, making the session interactive, with participants able to share their own experiences.

Please note that you must have attended the briefing session run by the Graduate School (lasting 1½ hour) as a prerequisite to attending this full-day workshop unless you have sufficient experience of supervising PhD students - this is defined as being a primary supervisor for at least one student successfully completing their PhD in the last five years. 

View the current programme of short courses

Page last modified on 23 jul 13 11:26


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