Tuberculosis (TB) at UCL

UCL-TB connects researchers in UCL and across their networks with the aim of improving research into TB, dissemination of research outcomes and new funding opportunities for research groups. 

TB News 

UCL-TB and London School of Tropical Hygiene and Medicine to Organise Conference for World TB Day

World TB Day is taking place on Tuesday the 24th March. UCL and our close partners the London School of Tropical Hygiene and Medicine will be organising an exciting day's events to share our research in TB. We will be announcing the agenda shortly, and look forward to opening bookings shortly. In the meantime please save the date, and if you would like to pre-register your interest then email Kim Morgan at kim.morgan@ucl.ac.uk

MAMS-TB trial stops recruiting patients to two arms

10 March 2014

The MAMS-TB trial is a TB clinical trial with an innovative study design.  The trial is  being conducted by the PanACEA consortium, of which UCL is a major partner; the MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL are responsible for data analysis and the UCL Centre for Clinical Microbiology provide the laboratory expertise.

The MAMS-TB trial aims to identify combinations of drugs that could shorten tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Standard TB treatment currently lasts around 6 months. The MAMS-TB trial is comparing 4 new combinations of drugs with the standard 6-month combination. It uses the innovating multi-arm, multi-stage approach, which allows several treatments to be assessed against a single control arm. Those that are not sufficiently promising can be dropped after interim analyses. This allows resources to be focused on those treatments that are most likely to be an improvement compared to the current standard treatment.

The trial is stopping recruiting patients to two of its arms. This follows a meeting of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC) which looked at interim analyses. The IDMC recommended that the arms testing the HRZQ and HR20ZQ combinations of drugs should be closed, as the interim results were not promising enough. These two arms include the drug SQ109 instead of ethambutol in the standard 6-month combination with rifampicin given at the higher dose of 20mg/kg in the HR20ZQ arm. Patients are still being recruited to the other three arms of the trial.

To read the full story in SLMS News:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/slms/slms-news/slms/MAMS-TB

UCL Donors help fund a forgotten treatment for TB

13 February 2014

UCL donors John and Ann –Margaret Walton have made possible research to progress the understanding of tuberculomucin, a potential alternative treatment for TB that was invented before the Second World War.

‘Tuberculomucin – a forgotten treatment – may give us a powerful new method of combatting this ancient but continually burdensome disease which has always claimed more lives amongst the young and economically active than any other age group’
Dr Carole Reeves, UCL


The research taking place at the UCL Divisions of Infection and Immunity, and Medicine along with the UCL Department of Science & Technology Studies aims to explore the mode of action of  tuberculomucin to assess its viability as an alternative treatment for TB. Dr Freidrich Weleminsky developed it as a possible cure for TB in the early 20th Century. Historians and scientists will work together to understand the history of tuberculomucin as a TB treatment in the pre-antibiotic period and its possible application today...  READ More in UCL Development & Alumni Relations Office (DARO)News

North London TB Journal Club

Organiser: Tom Yates t.yates@ucl.ac.uk
Link to North London TB Journal Club site: http://northlondontb.org/


4-5pm, 5 February 2015

Why does HIV so dramatically increase susceptibility to TB? 

Why do HIV positive people remain more susceptible once established on antiretrovirals? Join us to learn more about alveolar macrophages, T cells and the immune response to mycobacteria.Paper: Jambo et al. Asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy exhibit impaired lung CD4(+) T-cell responses to mycobacteria. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014; 190(8): 938-47 [available here]. Presenter: James Brown, University College London Chair: Marc Lipman, University College London Time: 4-5pm, 5 February 2015 Venue: Tutorial Room 1, lower ground floor, Royal Free Hospital.Tutorial Room 1 is on the Lower Ground Floor at the Royal Free Hospital. For a more detailed view, please click on the map northlondontb.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/royal-free-hospital-lg-map.jpg. For directions to the Royal Free Hospital, please go to www.royalfree.nhs.uk/contact-us/getting-to-our-hospitals/how-to-get-to-royal-free-hospital

4-5pm, 5 February 2015

Why does HIV so dramatically increase susceptibility to TB? Why do HIV positive people remain more susceptible once established on antiretrovirals? Join us to learn more about alveolar macrophages, T cells and the immune response to mycobacteria.

Paper: Jambo et al. Asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy exhibit impaired lung CD4(+) T-cell responses to mycobacteria. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2014; 190(8): 938-47 [available here].
Presenter: James Brown, University College London
Chair: Marc Lipman, University College London
Time: 4-5pm, 5 February 2015
Venue: Tutorial Room 1, lower ground floor, Royal Free Hospital.

Tutorial Room 1 is on the Lower Ground Floor at the Royal Free Hospital. For a more detailed view, please click on the map [https://northlondontb.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/royal-free-hospital-lg-map.jpg]. For directions to the Royal Free Hospital, please click here [https://www.royalfree.nhs.uk/contact-us/getting-to-our-hospitals/how-to-get-to-royal-free-hospital/].

Contact us

Tell us about your latest projects and events related to TB or ask us a question about TB.

Please contact UCL-TB administrator Kim Morgan kim.morgan@ucl.ac.uk

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Page last modified on 29 jan 15 16:32