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50 Things You Should Know about Space written by Prof Raman Prinja

50 Things You Should Know About Space

What exactly goes on at the International Space Station and why does the Earth spin? Just how big is our galaxy and how did the Moon form? From constellations to space shuttles, Space is as endlessly fascinating as the universe itself.
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Group photo

Cosmic Web

About 30 UCL and French astronomers gathered on 9 & 10 June 2016 at the Royal Astronomical Society in London to discuss the “Cosmic Web”, the complex large scale structure in the universe. The meeting was sponsored by the French Embassy, within UCL’s Grand Challenges programme. The meeting was organised by Aurelien Benoit-Levy (IAP), Ofer Lahav (UCL) and others.  More...

Twinkle illustration

UCL-led Twinkle exoplanet mission completes design milestone

Twinkle, a mission led by UCL scientists that will unravel the story of planets in our galaxy, has completed a key design milestone.  The results of the “payload study” demonstrate that Twinkle’s instruments will be able to achieve the mission’s science objectives. More...

LSST

World-first film of the Universe

The Science and Technology Facilities Council confirmed the UK's participation in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) this week, an international project that UCL astronomers have been involved in since 2013. 
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Astronomy in the Classroom

This is an ongoing outreach programme based at the University College London Observatory and funded by small awards from the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

School groups (daytime) tour the installations and get a short lecture followed by some discussion. Weather permitting, telescopes are used to observe the Sun in white light and in
H-alpha, a special filter to observe spectacular prominences and flares. Sometimes it is possible to observe the planet Venus.

Looking at the Sun
Observatory IT manager Theo Schlichter assists school children observing the Sun through a narrow band hydrogen filter.

We also visit schools to give lectures and demonstrations to large groups and offering the children an opportunity to observe the Sun with a portable H-alpha solar telescope (STFC funded).

Look at the Sun
Francisco Diego uses the portable H-alpha telescope during a school visit.


So far the programme has been attended by around 15,000 school children and teachers. Our current target is for 300 children visiting the observatory and 2500 children at visiting lectures every year.

Looking at the Sun
Large groups at the observatory using the portable H-alpha telescope.

Page last modified on 19 apr 16 10:42